Getting the worst students in your class to BEHAVE..

Discussion in 'General Education Archives' started by ThinkOutLoud, Jan 29, 2007.

  1. ThinkOutLoud

    ThinkOutLoud Rookie

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    Jan 29, 2007

    Hi all,

    With the helpful assistance of Clarnet73, please find attached several articles that were written by a colleague of mine who is an expert in Behavior Management. Thought they'd be a useful point of discussion, if not provide some really fantastic tips to use! They're free for whoever would like to have a read through them. I also recommend following the links included for a more detailed and extensive bank of resources on this area.

    Feedback welcome anytime! Enjoy!
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 29, 2007
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  3. TeacherShelly

    TeacherShelly Aficionado

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    Jan 30, 2007

    Wow, I've only read the first two pages of "How to Get Silence" and already have to comment. What is UP with needing to control kids? "...knowing that they will do as you ask – without question."

    I want students to be able to think for themselves. I want them to ask questions. Your expert friend sounds like a boot camp sargeant.
     
  4. TeacherShelly

    TeacherShelly Aficionado

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    OK, I have to re-reply. I see you're Aussie. That's why I've misinterpreted the tone of his article as being bossy and crazed-controllish. I can't explain it, but the Brits and Aussie's say things that sound really respectful live, but sarcastic and mean (to me) written. So, I see he's not really a nutter, but I misinterpreted him that way before.

    I looked over his other articles, and the rest of the "Silence" one. He makes some good points and good suggestions.
     
  5. MollyT

    MollyT Companion

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    Jan 30, 2007

    I have read some of the article and although it looks good, it seems like it was written for high school. I cant see doing some of those things with my Year 2/3s. ;)
     
  6. mrs. dub

    mrs. dub Companion

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    Jan 30, 2007

    Excellent article on "How to get silence". Perfect for middle school!
     
  7. ThinkOutLoud

    ThinkOutLoud Rookie

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    Jan 30, 2007

    Glad you've found these helpful. Changeofcareer, yes I'm an Aussie and my colleague is from the UK (interesting combination!) He's working as an expert in a Behavior Focussed school, hence the strict and structured strategies.

    I too truly believe that students need to have a voice in the classroom...the trick is FIRST establishing mutual respect and boundaries through a positive rapport, THEN freeing up the learning environment to allow for this appropriate and relevant sharing of ideas between teacher and student.

    I really encourage people to keep checking out and having a thorough look through these articles and links within them to further resources and ideas.

    Thanks and keep up the feedback!
    ThinkOutLoud.

    PS Thought to include a couple of bonus free sites my colleague and I would love to share with you all (includes free resources that support the methods discussed in the Articles, plus REVIEWS on these resources to show effectiveness.) Enjoy!

    www.classroom-management.org/free1NDC.html

    www.reviewed-information.com/classroom1ndc.html
     
  8. 4monthcountdown

    4monthcountdown Comrade

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    Jan 30, 2007

    I thought it was great information. I shared it with my principal and he really appreciated it. He is going to pass it on to teachers in the upper grades in my school.
     
  9. ThinkOutLoud

    ThinkOutLoud Rookie

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    Jan 30, 2007

    Hi MollyT,
    At first glance it can seem hard to relate these methods with younger grades, but I really believe that the ideas in these articles are really relevant for any age...the methods may need tailoring for your own class, then again, this will be the case for anyone because you know your students best. If you follow the basic principles Eg. how to get silence, and adapt this creatively to your own students' needs (which is what us teachers do best I have to say), I think you'll be pleasantly surprised :)
    I'm thrilled to share these articles with everyone and truly hope they can make a noticeable difference for you in your own class.
    Keep me posted how things are going :)
     
  10. ThinkOutLoud

    ThinkOutLoud Rookie

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    Jan 30, 2007

    4monthcountdown,

    I'm really happy to hear that! The ideas/strategies are so strong and effective, they really do work.
    Please don't hesitate to let me know how the rest of your staff go with their classes.
    Any subsequent questions and/or ordering can be done through me online. I can give you the correct link and it's that simple!
    Keep in touch ;)
     
  11. Mr. Windchill

    Mr. Windchill Rookie

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    Jan 30, 2007

    Thank you so much for pasting that articles. I read close to the end of "How to Get Silence From the Worst School in Class." I would like to print it off to keep handy (I've always preferred reading paper copies of anything opposed to on the monitor). As a first year teacher who has hit the highs as well as the lows in the midst of still establishing classroom harmony, I look forward to employing the techniques discussed ... and while I haven't clicked on the links yet, the author may have done a fantastic job of selling a few more books.

    I will have to tailor a few things as well. I teach high school students. Having students line up outside the hallway until they cooperate may not be well received by the administration who's more concerned with getting kids out of the hallways by the time the bell rings, but I like the idea of not allowing them to sit down right away until told.

    I think the biggest manipulation will be sanctions. There are not "breaks" I can take away from the students. I have my students for approximately 45 minutes from bell to bell. There is no recess or bathroom/water breaks, etc. to remove from them.

    Again, thanks for posting the material, it is by far the best material I have read thus far.
     
  12. ThinkOutLoud

    ThinkOutLoud Rookie

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    Jan 30, 2007

    That's great Mr Windchill!

    Happy to help ;) Don't hesitate to follow those added links when you're ready to because the skills are so incredible, yet very down-to-earth and practical (which is why it appeals to teachers like us.)

    Keep me posted ;)
     

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