Getting so discouraged

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by allaragallagher, May 23, 2014.

  1. allaragallagher

    allaragallagher Comrade

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2014
    Messages:
    254
    Likes Received:
    11

    May 23, 2014

    I have a list of all the schools that I have applied to. It had 33 places all across the state on it. I even applied for jobs in two neighboring states and the state my brother lives in. My job is job hunting. I've spent so much money on envelopes, printer paper, ink, stamps, etc. Yet I'm averaging ONE interview a year. I'm proactive and call to inquire whether the position has been filled. My list is dwindling down to nothing. New jobs have stopped popping up. I'm getting rejection emails and letters daily, sometimes as late as 8:00 pm on a Sunday. I'm just feeling so discouraged. My family can't understand it and neither can I.
     
  2.  
  3. miles2go4u

    miles2go4u Rookie

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2014
    Messages:
    46
    Likes Received:
    0

    May 23, 2014

    I'm sorry you are feeling so discouraged. It is a lot of work to put in and very devastating when you don' t get much back. Have you also sent person emails to the principals of the specific schools you applied to? Have you tried going in person to drop off resume/cover letter?
     
  4. heatherewf

    heatherewf Rookie

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2013
    Messages:
    59
    Likes Received:
    0

    May 23, 2014

    I sympathize! I graduated in Dec of 2010 and have gotten two endorsements since then. I've applied to probably 60 districts, possibly 100 positions. I've had over a dozen first interviews, only one second interview, and zero job offers. It's incredibly discouraging. I wish you luck!
     
  5. DressageLady

    DressageLady Comrade

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2009
    Messages:
    462
    Likes Received:
    38

    May 23, 2014

    It is discouraging. There is no way around that fact. As applicants, there is just so much we can do to stand out and at the end of the day a lot is decided on luck and timing.

    I don't have any words of wisdom. I think that most of us who have been left standing when the music stopped have really done everything possible to get hired. But I did want to say that you are not alone. Just keep trying. Have a back up plan if possible.

    Hang in there.
    Sheilah
     
  6. Flanny108

    Flanny108 Rookie

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2005
    Messages:
    71
    Likes Received:
    0

    May 23, 2014

    Can you try begin a substitute teacher? That way you can get to know some principals. If you really go above and beyond teachers will call you back to sub for them and that may lead to a long term sub position and eventually a permanent position. I know it can be so frustrating when you just want to get out there and teach.
    Good luck!
     
  7. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2006
    Messages:
    7,075
    Likes Received:
    15

    May 23, 2014

    Last year, my interview rate was about 1 out of every 10 postings I responded to. In previous years, it was closer to 1 out of every 25-30. I really, really worked hard on improving my resume. I volunteered and signed up for everything I could. I drastically revamped my resume and cover letter.
    Basically, even though it feels like you are doing a lot (and I'm sure you are!), you have to do more than just apply.

    Last year I responded to roughly 300 job postings. I interviewed with about 30 different school districts. With 2nd, 3rd, and 4th interviews, I went to more than 50 interviews. I had ONE job offer at a terrible inner-city start-up charter. But I didn't give up. I took a LTS and eventually landed a mid-year permanent job 90 miles away.
     
  8. allaragallagher

    allaragallagher Comrade

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2014
    Messages:
    254
    Likes Received:
    11

    May 23, 2014

    Yes, I've taken applications in when possible. I've called and emailed principals before (I never receive responses). I've spent the last year substitute teaching. Even though I was requested a lot and the staff really liked me, I was passed over for a position three times. I tutor and volunteer in the community. I've gone on interviews to get a job leading story time at the local library (it went to a retired teacher), for a long term sub position (it was elem. and I only have experience with 7-12), and for a Ed Tech I position (strong candidate but over qualified). I don't think my resume is lacking. I sent it to one of my old professors, my older brother, and his boss to have it looked over. I applied everywhere last year and got one interview. I've applied for every teaching job I'm qualified this year and received one interview so far.
     
  9. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2006
    Messages:
    7,075
    Likes Received:
    15

    May 23, 2014

    There is a difference between not 'lacking' and standing out.

    My old resume was nothing special. I had a few stand out moments (awards, grants, a special training), but other than that it looked like every single teacher resume out there. I made it a point to find things to add to my resume- I volunteered as a regional science fair judge, I presented at a science conference, I volunteered as a high school graduation project judge, took a training course, etc... I then completely changed the format of my resume so it really stands out. I often get compliments of the design AND it shows off another area that I excel in.
     
  10. Luv2TeachInTX

    Luv2TeachInTX Comrade

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2012
    Messages:
    332
    Likes Received:
    48

    May 24, 2014

    Have you thought about adding certifications to make yourself more competitive? I didn't really get many interviews until I added a special education cert. Granted they are all for special ed positions, but still. It's a way to get your foot in the door and prove yourself. Are you only applying to public schools? If you are try charters and private as well.
     
  11. TeachMathNJ

    TeachMathNJ Companion

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2007
    Messages:
    137
    Likes Received:
    0

    May 24, 2014

    Just came across this thread; I feel exactly the same way. From the first moment I wake up I am constantly filling out applications and sending resumes and emails. I do have interviews lined up, and have had 2 already...but those stories are for another thread!

    Anyway, I know it is tough, just try to hang in there. I keep telling myself it isn't June yet and there is still time!

    Good luck to all and let's hope for some good news soon :)
     
  12. allaragallagher

    allaragallagher Comrade

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2014
    Messages:
    254
    Likes Received:
    11

    May 24, 2014

    I've already completely reformatted my resume as well. I did so after being passed up for all those positions at the school I student taught & substituted at. I thought there had to be something wrong with it or a reason why I hadn't stood out. I found out the principal just didn't like me.

    My resume includes my experience as a judge at our local speech contest, my inquiry/service project to the school, and an academic contract I designed. It also contains highlights like being the first student at my university to submit my required portfolio digitally.

    I have thought of adding certifications. I found out I was 15 credits shy of a secondary social studies endorsement. However, I looked into it and even as continuing education it is unaffordable. I have too much student debt to justify returning to school. I would just leave with another certification and still no experience to show for it.

    I'm applying everywhere for everything that I am qualified for. I had one interview last year, fresh out of college, at a private school. I've even applied for alternative and online teaching positions.

    I decided to send out the application for a license in Utah. My brother lives there and I think it'll have better job turnaround and more substitute and paraprofessional job opportunities for me than Maine. The teaching jobs here are scarce.
     
  13. willow129

    willow129 Comrade

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2013
    Messages:
    284
    Likes Received:
    0

    May 24, 2014

    Oh man, yeah, Maine?? Yeah. That's where I started out too. No job. Could not BELIEVE the people who were hired instead of me. Moved to MA, subbed, got a job a year later.

    Moving might be a good ... er ... move? :) haha
     
  14. allaragallagher

    allaragallagher Comrade

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2014
    Messages:
    254
    Likes Received:
    11

    May 24, 2014

    Tell me about it. It's certainly looking more and more possible as the months go by. I'm not originally from here either, which seems to hurt me.
     
  15. willow129

    willow129 Comrade

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2013
    Messages:
    284
    Likes Received:
    0

    May 24, 2014

    Yeah I wasn't originally from Maine either but I did go to University there and there were a lot of professors who used to teach in the community so I did feel like I had a foot in the door, it just wasn't going anywhere.

    Do you like rural areas?
     
  16. allaragallagher

    allaragallagher Comrade

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2014
    Messages:
    254
    Likes Received:
    11

    May 24, 2014

    I do. It's one of the reasons I'm hesitant to make the move to Salt Lake City. However, I like the idea of mass transit as I haven't been able to afford a car for the past year. Pros and cons.
     
  17. tonysam

    tonysam Comrade

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2010
    Messages:
    270
    Likes Received:
    0

    May 24, 2014

    Teaching is a bad field to get into. Always has been, and it isn't any better now.

    Went and applied for a special ed job at a local school district, a supposedly "high needs" area, and I never even made the cut for an interview. I am an experienced teacher with clear credentials. There were 45 people bidding for 3 jobs.
     
  18. tonysam

    tonysam Comrade

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2010
    Messages:
    270
    Likes Received:
    0

    May 24, 2014

    In this part of the country (Oregon) it is virtually impossible to sub and earn any kind of money at it, let alone work into a long-term sub job. It will work in other states, but not in Oregon. It can take four or five YEARS to land a job here, not an option if you are like me pushing 60. Too many people are on the sub lists, and retirees in this part of the state are favored for sub jobs. Furthermore, many long-term sub jobs are open for bid like a regular job, so it's not something you can just happen to get when it opens. It's disgusting.
     
  19. willow129

    willow129 Comrade

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2013
    Messages:
    284
    Likes Received:
    0

    May 25, 2014

    Yeah I love living in rural areas as well. Right now I'm in the city and trying to leave...it's funny because I think jobs are more competitive in the city but I managed to get one! How I did it was through extra certification and subbing. I was a day-to-day sub in a district, was then hired to be....what turned into a long-term sub for an aid, and the music teacher in the building I was working retired. The principal already knew me so I had a fair shot at the job, and then also I had extra training in the music ed philosophy that the department head preferred so from that angle I was also a good fit for the job, and he was mainly the one deciding. There were 140 applicants and they interviewed 10 people. So I guess my advice is network and get your foot in the door.

    Actually what I was going to say originally was, you might think about moving to other parts of New England. Maine is not exactly job city but Massachusetts is doing well, Vermont has more openings than I've seen in a while and it would be easy for you to get certified in Vermont and NH because they have the same test requirements as Maine. (Mass is different.) One thing though, if you are not certified they will not consider you, so if you decide to try those states, get certified in them first. It really won't take you long honestly.
     
  20. jforegolf

    jforegolf Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2008
    Messages:
    79
    Likes Received:
    0

    May 27, 2014

    The best thing you could do is not take it personally. Schools sometimes have hundreds of people applying for jobs( at least where I teach we get stacks of resumes for each job.) It is not personal. The school is just looking for the right fit.

    Here's my advice, highlight things on a resume that are useful to the school. Schools don't need judges in a speech contest( I don't mean that insultingly as that sounds really nice and is important). Schools need people willing to run after school programs, coach their sports teams, chaperone activities, join organizations, re-vamp curriculum, etc... Have you ever done any of that? Would you be willing to do those things? If so, make sure your resume and cover letter highlights those things and then I'd venture to say the interviews will roll in.
     
  21. ktmiller222

    ktmiller222 Cohort

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2011
    Messages:
    518
    Likes Received:
    14

    May 27, 2014

    I know exactly how you feel. I feel like I've spent more money on sending out application packets (approximately $2.50/$3.00 times that by like 100 different ones) this past year, then previous years. The only positive side is that I've been actually called this year for screening interviews. I did not get any positions. Sadly, during these screening interviews, I could already tell that they had someone else in mind because they did not seem interested in what I had to say. I just accepted the fact that the only chance I have is to quit my current job (good pay and medical insurance) and work my butt off as a sub in the Fall. Not saying I will land a job right away but I know it will take time. It seems like you really have to work your butt off and make a name for yourself no matter how long it takes. It's a chance I'm willing to take to get a teaching job.
     
  22. heatherewf

    heatherewf Rookie

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2013
    Messages:
    59
    Likes Received:
    0

    May 27, 2014

    If you're willing to move, find out which states have reciprocal licenses to yours. (I think that's what it's called lol). For instance, I have an Ohio license and I can teach in states such as Florida and Arizona without having to get any additional credits or anything. Both of those states have far more teaching opportunities than my area. If I didn't have two kids, a house, and a husband with a job, if seriously considering moving myself! I'm just kind of stuck at the moment.
     
  23. willow129

    willow129 Comrade

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2013
    Messages:
    284
    Likes Received:
    0

    May 28, 2014

    reciprocal licenses usually only work if the applicant has a couple of years of teaching experience though...
     
  24. allaragallagher

    allaragallagher Comrade

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2014
    Messages:
    254
    Likes Received:
    11

    May 28, 2014

    I was surprised. I've looked into a couple of states (WA, ID, and UT) and all but one of them allowed me a provisional license without any additional testing/credits. WA was the only state where all new teachers entering the state, even those with credentials from another state, have to take their WEST content exam for $120. I basically looked anywhere I've already lived and/or have family. :D I sent out for my Utah license. I think it's the best fit for me.
     
  25. allaragallagher

    allaragallagher Comrade

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2014
    Messages:
    254
    Likes Received:
    11

    May 28, 2014

    Thanks for the advice. My only problem with this is that all the applications I fill out specifically ask what extracurricular activities/clubs I'm qualified for and/or have experience in, and not what I would be interested in doing.

    Also, I think it's pretty obvious that I'd be willing to chaperone events, stay after school, and take on any extra responsibilities and duties. Stating that in my letter won't make a big difference if I haven't already done all that.
     
  26. heatherewf

    heatherewf Rookie

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2013
    Messages:
    59
    Likes Received:
    0

    May 28, 2014

    I didn't know this - thank you for the info!
     
  27. eireannash

    eireannash Rookie

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2013
    Messages:
    25
    Likes Received:
    0

    May 28, 2014

    When I graduated a few years ago, I decided to volunteer teach English in Costa Rica for a year (i think this really has helped in my job search - everyone mentions it) and when I came back to the states, all my friends I graduated with had jobs and I could not find one for the life of me. It was horrible. I was a nanny for a year and saved up money. Couldn't even get a sub job. I then left Chicago and moved to Denver. The job market isn't great but better than Chicago for sure. I'm getting my masters online and it is a lot cheaper. I know the endorsement for ESL is even cheaper online where I am getting my MA from.

    Things are rough and it is hard. I know it is difficult not to take it personally. I had to learn how to do that. If you have the opportunity to do so and feel comfortable, you can always ask for advice or tips. I know people who have done that because they kept getting passed over and one principal gave some great advice. I second the emails and keep trying. I stopped mailing materials because of expenses. I email and got my jobs that way.

    Maybe you can have other teachers look at your resume and cover letter or do mock interviews.

    I know how you feel, I even started applying to middle of nowhere - need a plane to get there- Alaska. That is how upset and down I was. It will happen for you and it will be great. In the meantime stay confident and keep it up. When people told me something would come along I wanted to punch them, but it is true. Something will happen.
     
  28. jforegolf

    jforegolf Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2008
    Messages:
    79
    Likes Received:
    0

    May 28, 2014

    I think their is a point in stating the fact that you would eagerly participate in school events because it shows any perspective employer that you understand that teaching in a school makes you a member of that school community. A paragraph like:

    Working in a school certainty involves a lot more than teaching lessons. My job as a teacher makes me a part of the school community. I take that very seriously and would do whatever it takes to contribute to a positive school environment. I'd welcome the opportunity to lead an exteacurriclar activity and have experience in.......... I'd enthusiastically participate on committees when given the chance and willingly attend all school functions. ( something like this honestly as I've not put much thought into the words).

    The reason this is important is that too many people don't include these basic things in their applications and this will actually set you apart because it shows that you are aware that teaching is more than fancy lesson plans and great bulletin boards. The day to day tasks mean something. Again it's just my opinion. Others may disagree.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. vickilyn
Total: 163 (members: 1, guests: 132, robots: 30)
test