Getting Rid of Teaching Position

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by dunwool, Apr 6, 2010.

  1. dunwool

    dunwool Rookie

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    Apr 6, 2010

    My school is a k-8 school with one classroom for each grade. Next year we are brainstorming ways to cut one teaching position since the third grade teacher is resigning. I wanted to get your ideas of how to consolidate things with the same number of children but fewer teachers. Right now each grade has their individual teacher and the elementary music, pe, and library are taught by other teachers in the building to serve as a prep time for elementary. Any and all ideas are greatly appreciated! Help us get creative! :)
     
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  3. Proud2BATeacher

    Proud2BATeacher Phenom

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    Apr 6, 2010

    How large are your classes? Is your kg. class half day or full day?
     
  4. Toak

    Toak Cohort

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    Apr 6, 2010

    So you are the one retiring then? Without combining a grade (or 2), you are going to have 8 teachers for 9 grades, so one teacher will always be floating around between classrooms.

    If you really can't afford to hire another teacher, combining kindergarten and first grade, or 7th and 8th into one classroom would probably work best. Or combine 6,7, and 8th into two classrooms divided by ability
     
  5. Mrs. R.

    Mrs. R. Connoisseur

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    We've had great success with combined 1-2 in our district.
     
  6. JaimeMarie

    JaimeMarie Moderator

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    Apr 6, 2010

    I would look at ability grouping instead of grade level grouping.
    When I taught k-8th grade, I taught lessons based on ability. It wouldn't be unusual to find me teaching science to my 4th grade and my second grader and science to my 5th/6th and a 7th grader and another science to 7th/8th grade.

    You could have flexible classrooms. If a 3rd grader is strong in math and science they could go to 4th grade, and weaker in reading/writing/social studies go to the 2nd grade classroom.
     
  7. JaimeMarie

    JaimeMarie Moderator

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    Apr 6, 2010

    Another idea would be have a multi age rooms 2/3 and 3/4
     
  8. dunwool

    dunwool Rookie

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    Apr 7, 2010

    Yes, I am the one leaving the school. Right now we have classes of 13 at the most. My class is 13 and it is largest in the school. The administration doesn't want to combine classes because they are afraid we will lose student. I suggested splitting the third grade between the 2nd and 4th grade but they don't waant to upset parents with tthat decision. In this school the parents basically run the show. Everything is done out of fear that a parents may be upset withthe decision but itt is hurting the students at this point. Thank you for the help and any more ideas are appreciated.
     
  9. dr.gator

    dr.gator Comrade

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    Apr 7, 2010

    I agree with the person who said do away with "grade groups". I would look at the K-3 children and then the 4-8 chlidren and ability group knowing that you would have to divide the kids 8 ways because of the eight teachers. Use your student data you have collected over the course of the year to make your decision on where to place the child and then you have something to show the parents when they question your decision. I would also research multi age grouping on the internet. Use that as a resource when talking with parents. I would also seriously considering shuffling my teachers around. For instance, my K teacher might be teaching a group of students in the 4-8 group and vice versa. That way parents will not instantly associate "grades" with the groups you have formed. Let us know how it works out. It could be something new and revolutionary that you start in your state.
     
  10. wrice

    wrice Habitué

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    Apr 7, 2010

    If parents are the primary concern, I don't see how any consolidation would appeal to them. Is this a private school? They're paying tuition for small class size and close attention, and they're accustomed to one teacher per grade. I personally see value in ability grouping, but would not want to be there when the conversation to the parents of the lower-achieving students occurs, and they find out their beloved will be grouped with younger kids. There are certainly creative solutions out there, but 'selling it' seems to be the major obstacle. I think the school needs to hire a replacement.
     
  11. Miss JE

    Miss JE Companion

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    Apr 7, 2010

    Wow - I am surprised that parents have that much say on those type of decisions. Honestly in our district they would almost combine three of those classes and give them all to 1 teacher. Even if you split the 3rd grade between 2nd and 4th they would still have less than 20 students which is AMAZING!!! I guess the parents should either take that option or move to a different school whose numbers are probably higher anyways
     
  12. dr.gator

    dr.gator Comrade

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    Apr 8, 2010

    Look at what the op has listed for where she's at. It says she is in Montana. I would conclude that she is in an isolated area that is lucky to have a local school without being bused to other places. And yes, I can imagine parents having that much control. I have worked in a class per grade level school before. The parents are very much "in" to what happens at the school. It is one of their primary sources of socializing. In small communities and small areas, the school is a very much talked about place.
     

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