Getting Discouraged

Discussion in 'General Education' started by bmi568, Apr 16, 2014.

  1. bmi568

    bmi568 New Member

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    Apr 16, 2014

    I graduated from college in December with a B.S.E. in elementary education. I have sent out at least 20 resumes and I have only gotten called twice for an interview. I'm strarting to panic about what I am going to do next year. I currently work as a paraeducator but I don't know what to do from here on out. Should I look into teaching somewhere outside of my state?
     
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  3. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    Apr 16, 2014

    It has only been 3-4 months. On average, a new teacher spends at least 1 year subbing (or working in general) while looking for jobs. For some (few) it happens right away, but there are quite a few for whom it took 3 years or so to get a job. There are lot of teachers out there, many with experience, not that many jobs, so you have to be patient.
     
  4. ScienceEd

    ScienceEd Companion

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    Apr 16, 2014

    I heard it takes a while. You just have to keep making those connections and networking. Sometimes its not always about just the things you know but the people you have impressed along the way.
     
  5. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Apr 16, 2014

    For some people, they do get interviewed and hired right away. For the vast majority, they have to wait. Many districts aren't looking at hiring until after state testing. Give it time, keep pushing applications and resumes and good luck!
     
  6. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    Apr 16, 2014

    First of all, it is very early to be getting discouraged about next year.

    Second of all, last year I had 6 years of experience and a whole lot of unique trainings. I responded to over 300 (I stopped keeping track after a while) postings. I was interviewed by about 30 different districts. That is a 10% interview rate. You said you were interviewed twice with 20 resumes. For someone without experience, that is a pretty good percentage.
     
  7. Mrs.DLC

    Mrs.DLC Comrade

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    Apr 16, 2014

    It is early, however, you may want to consider another state/area if you are able to relocate. Especially if it gets to be June, etc. Good luck!!
     
  8. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    Apr 16, 2014

    20 resumes? I filled out applications for every single district in Virginia and Maryland last time I was on the job hunt, and about 15 districts in West Virginia (plus every Buffalo and Rochester, NY area district, but those districts have a nifty one-click application process where you can apply to many districts at once). Altogether, I'd estimate about 1000 principals had access to my resume. I got SIX interviews. Total. If you want a job, then you need to send resumes EVERYWHERE. Think about places you'd be willing to move. Think about how long a commute you'd be willing to commit to.
     
  9. Go Blue!

    Go Blue! Connoisseur

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    Apr 16, 2014

    Did you ever apply to Baltimore City PS? Did you get an interview or anything?
     
  10. Go Blue!

    Go Blue! Connoisseur

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    OP, are there any teacher job fairs at colleges in your area you can attend?

    Also, I had the best luck applying to large urban districts (although, I took the first job offered to me at my school's annual job fair).
     
  11. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    I did apply to Baltimore City (and County)... I think a lot of the state was under a hiring freeze though. I had an interview with some folks from PGC, and they basically said a lot of the state wouldn't be hiring. Once I got my first job offer, I pulled all the applications that were electronic, and available to be pulled though, so I may have gotten more calls had I waited.

    (And truthfully, the year I spent in Charles County had me so disillusioned with Maryland that I didn't actually do any follow-ups... I filled out applications, and I returned phone calls, but I didn't do anything proactive).
     
  12. Go Blue!

    Go Blue! Connoisseur

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    Really? I've always heard the kids in Charles County were pretty decent and not as bad as PG County or Balt. County which are both crapshoots (some schools are really great, others are a nightmare).
     
  13. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    The KIDS were fine...
     
  14. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    Apr 16, 2014

    It is only April. This is a month that Ps often do little hiring. May is a larger month of hiring and June often the largest of all. Keep "pounding the pavement" and keep at it with resumes, letters, polishing your interviewing skills etc. It is still early.
     
  15. allaragallagher

    allaragallagher Comrade

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    Apr 17, 2014

    I know how you feel, OP.

    I graduated May 2013. I keep in touch with my graduating class through Facebook. There were thirteen of us (English-certified secondary teachers) who graduated together and five received job offers that first hiring season -- May through June '13. Of those, only one had to move to a neighboring state for a position teaching math.

    At least three that I know of have not actively been looking for a teaching position (two are content to work in the "family business" now that they have college degrees and one already gave up on teaching for a different career.) I, on the other hand, have expanded my search to any state that offers reciprocity and another recently moved to Boston to try to land a teaching job.

    If I don't get a teaching position this hiring season I know I am stuck substituting again come August. Since I will have been passed over at every nearby school district for other candidates by then, I won't be sticking around. I don't want to sub. indefinitely; I want to teach. So I'll be moving across country if need be. I hope I pick a state with a lot of retiring educators...
     
  16. kpa1b2

    kpa1b2 Aficionado

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    Apr 17, 2014

    20 resumes isn't a lot. 2 interviews with only 20 resumes is good. It's still early. A lot of districts in my area are just beginning to start looking with most of the hiring completed in July/August.

    Keep applying and apply everywhere!

    Good luck!
     
  17. jen12

    jen12 Devotee

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    Apr 17, 2014

    Subbing IS teaching.
     
  18. Go Blue!

    Go Blue! Connoisseur

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    ^^^ I am not trying to be disrespectful to subs, but in my district subs are only paid $85 a day (if they have a BA/BS AND a Maryland teaching certificate).

    Starting teacher salary is $48K with pension and benefits. Not the same. At. All.
     
  19. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Apr 18, 2014

    No one is saying a contracted teacher and a sub have the same circumstances...but a good, reliable sub who earns respect from other teachers and students does have some leeway in terms of testing out his/her 'teaching chops'. It's a good way to get known among different districts, home skills and gain experience in a variety of settings.

    If you equate pay with who you consider a 'teacher', you'd be leaving a whole bunch of early childhood educators, private school teachers (I earned less than half as much money as a Catholic school teacher than a first year public school teacher) and others who are looking to gain experience in other settings....I understand your point, Go Blue, but there are plenty of new graduates who are gaining experience subbing and those who choose to work exclusively as subs who are teachers, making a difference for kids and for whom money might not be the definition of what they do and why they do it.
     
  20. Go Blue!

    Go Blue! Connoisseur

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    I am talking about subs strictly - not early childhood educators, not private school teachers, etc. - substitutes only.

    I get what you're saying about the experience you can gain as a sub. But, I still stand by my original statement that there is a difference between subbing and being a full-time teacher.
     
  21. John Lee

    John Lee Groupie

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    Apr 19, 2014

    But let's not sugar-coat it. $100/day is abysmal. And I would almost disagree with the notion that subbing is teaching, when you consider the lack of respect from the district level, not to mention "fellow teachers".
     
  22. allaragallagher

    allaragallagher Comrade

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    It's not the lack of respect, low pay, or tied hands when it comes to discipline. It's the fact that when someone looks at my resume with a year of substituting, it doesn't go toward "teaching experience." Therefore, substituting does not equal teaching.
     
  23. Go Blue!

    Go Blue! Connoisseur

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    Apr 19, 2014

    ^^^ Exactly. And, subbing won't give you the years earned credit when you finally get hired. You can sub for twenty years and when you are finally hired as a teacher, the district will put you back at year one on the pay scale.
     
  24. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

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    Apr 19, 2014

    In Texas if you sub for 90 days of the school year, you get a year of teaching credit for retirement.

    I've not looked that up myself but have heard it from five reliable sources.
     
  25. John Lee

    John Lee Groupie

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    If it doesn't go toward teaching experience, what would it go toward?
     

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