Getting an interview

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by mivana, Dec 2, 2017.

  1. mivana

    mivana New Member

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    Dec 2, 2017

    I am currently a student teacher and am hoping to land a full time position for the next school year. Based on all the research I have done, it seems as though the entire application process is online and most districts put on their HR page that they do not want any paper copies of resumes or cover letters sent to the schools, administrators, etc. However, since I will be a first year teacher I am afraid that since I have no experience, my online application will not stand out and that I will not even get an interview. I know that I am highly qualified and would be a great candidate, but without having a conversation with an employer I'm afraid that they would only see on paper that I have no teaching experience. What is proper protocol when it comes to contacting administrators in the district? Is it acceptable to send an email inquiring about open positions and stating my interest, or should I just apply online and leave it at that? What about stopping in to the schools in person? I am receiving conflicting information from my university supervisors, and am curious to know what is really acceptable out in the real job-seeking world!
     
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  3. Always__Learning

    Always__Learning Comrade

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    Dec 2, 2017

    It really depends on your context. Where I am speaking to administrators would have 0 impact because all hiring is done centrally and there are very specific rules guiding who gets an interview. I would suggest talking to teachers in your region, specifically teachers who have recently got jobs. The other thing to recognize that if getting a full time job immediately is possible depends on your context too. Where I am no one gets a job straight out of school - it takes years on the supply list to get a chance at an opening - but again that may be different in your region - talk to local teachers and people who have been hired recently.
     
  4. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Fanatic

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    Dec 3, 2017

    Not to generalize, not all applications are online, that depends on your area. In NJ most are, but some are still mail or email (not the same as online via applitrac).

    I would follow what the job postings say. If they say not to contact them, don’t. After you apply if you want to let the school leader know you applied, send an email. I found this to mostly be a waste of time.

    I always say start by trying for the easiest way in, Charter or Catholic school.
     
    Linguist92021 likes this.
  5. svassillion

    svassillion Companion

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    Dec 3, 2017

    In MA you would need to have a connection to someone to get a teaching position right out of school. I'd say it typically takes about four years after graduating to get a classroom that you actually want to teach. Could be different for your area though.
     
  6. mathematicalanomaly

    mathematicalanomaly Rookie

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    Dec 13, 2017

    I'm in NC and I was hired before spring break of my student teaching. I found a county I wanted and didn't hesitate to go after them. I emailed each principal a unique and thoughtfully crafted cover letter in addition to the online application and was given an interview with each school, and then immediately offered a position at each elementary school in the district. I had my pick of the district, basically. Write the emails, craft them thoughtfully, do your research. Anything generic will be glossed over. I spent hours pouring over their facebooks, their teacher's twitter accounts, I researched grants they had recently applied for and wove it seamlessly into my cover letters. I made them concise, but deep and personal, and each principal told me it was the cover letter that snagged their attention.

    In larger counties, I am sure principals do not read every email that is sent to them, nor do they read every cover letter. I was specifically looking for a small town/community school, so that worked out in my favor for sure.

    Of course, it's NC and it's absolutely miserable to teach here so...grain of salt. It's not hard to find a job here because they're so desperate to find teachers because everyone is fleeing the state. Though, to be fair, many of my peers that graduated the same year as me are STILL looking for a classroom of their own, and working as an aid or assistant in the mean time....you can't just be a warm body by any means. That said, I didn't want just ANY job and I was very specific about the grade level/region of NC/type of school I wanted to be at. Having the schools in the district fight over me in that sense gave me a bit of leverage to say "I will chose your school if I can teach X grade and teach X subject" which was very nice and probably extremely unique of someone 2 months into their student teaching experience.

    If you're trying to get hired in a more desirable state I'm certain this is not the case and it's more of a "take what you can get" situation for the first few years.
     

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