Getting a master's degree?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by kassrose, Nov 17, 2009.

  1. kassrose

    kassrose Companion

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    Nov 17, 2009

    Hey all,

    I'm graduating in Dec with a degree in El Ed and I am thinking about going straight into a master's program because of the bleak job situation.

    My question is this: I can't find a master's in education that I'm passionate about. I'd really like to get a master's in nonprofit management, and since schools are nonprofits, it seems applicable.

    However, on a pay scale (where you get more money for having a master's degree), do you think school would recognize that as a master's that is applicable to education?

    Or does it only count if you have an MEd?
     
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  3. jday129

    jday129 Comrade

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    Nov 17, 2009

    I don't think my school would count it, but if I were you I would call your local districts and ask the personnel department.
    My masters is in TESOL (teaching ESL)/intercultural studies and they counted that, though I usually have to justify the intercultural studies part.
     
  4. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Nov 17, 2009

    Just be careful about pricing yourself out of the job market.

    In many districts, the tendency is not to hire a brand new teacher with a Masters if they can find one with a Bachelors. The thinking is that both new teachers are going to need some support, and are unknown, untested quantities. It's a whole lot cheaper to take a chance on the candidate with the Bachelors.
     
  5. Mrs. K.

    Mrs. K. Enthusiast

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    Nov 17, 2009

    :yeahthat:
     
  6. SouthernBuckeye

    SouthernBuckeye Companion

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    Nov 17, 2009

    I'm currently teaching with a bachelors, but working on my masters part time. Is it hard to get a job if you have a masters AND experience or does this only apply to a masters and NO experience? I will probably have about 5 years experience by the time I'm done.
     
  7. wrice

    wrice Habitué

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    I believe my school would value your master's in anything beneficial to your teaching, but would have trouble with little experience. Can you work at a day care or tutoring service concurrent with your master's? Gina, it depends on your subject and specialty, but a M.Ed and 5 yrs are great! For instance, if you're a bilingual elementary science teacher, you can get hired in TX quick and get some tuition reimbursement from the school.
     
  8. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Nov 17, 2009

    I think it's the higher price tag with the lack of experience that districts are wary of.

    More education and more experience should, in theory, make you more valuable as an employee.
     
  9. Windy City

    Windy City Companion

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    Nov 17, 2009

    A Master's in nonprofit management wouldn't count in my area.

    Plus, you need to consider your competition. If it were down to two candidates (one with a M.Ed. and one with a M.A. not related to education), they would probably go with the M.Ed.

    You can still look for jobs while working on your Master's, so it's not like you would be priced out of the market by next fall. A Master's takes a good 2-3 years to complete, and I would assume that you would be actively looking for a teaching job during those times. You can always take a semester or two off if you get a job.
     
  10. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Virtuoso

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    Nov 17, 2009

    Call your central office and ask.

    I wasn't interested in any of the education masters programs, but my state requires a masters degree . . . so I had to pick something. I ended up getting a subject area masters. Since it was a "teachable area", it was fine.
     
  11. kassrose

    kassrose Companion

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    Nov 18, 2009

    Thanks for the insight, I really appreciate it. Another quick question: I don't want to teach special ed, but would consider a master's in special ed since I think alot of the classes (differentiating instruction, etc.) would be applicable to gen ed as well. If I had a master's in special ed, would that limit me to only teaching special ed?
     
  12. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Nov 18, 2009

    It would probably increase your chances of finding a job, but that job would most likely be in special ed.
     
  13. AliceBrown

    AliceBrown New Member

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    Nov 18, 2009

    More questions about Master's Degree

    I hope you don't mind my piggybacking on this question. I'm thinking about getting my Master's degree, but there are so many types of Master's degree in education.

    From what I understand, there's a general Master's in Education, but there are also Master's in Literacy, Master's in Administration, etc. Can someone give me a description of these various cencentrations and the relevance of each one? I tried looking online, but couldn't find any good sources. I was hoping someone with field experience could tell me which is which and which is better. I want to teach secondary English, with or without a focus on ESL, but I'm not sure on the latter.

    Thanks.
     

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