getting a job with a masters degree

Discussion in 'General Education' started by athenssoest, Dec 22, 2010.

  1. athenssoest

    athenssoest Rookie

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    Dec 22, 2010

    Is it difficult to get hired by a new school system when you have a masters and some experience because you are more expensive for them to hire?
     
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  3. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    Dec 22, 2010

    It really depends on the district. I know that some districts in my area only hire teachers with experience. Others only want newer teachers. So it really does depend on the district.

    There are so many stories of teachers being turned down because they don't have experience.
     
  4. donziejo

    donziejo Devotee

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    I think you have a better chance with the experience. In my district the pay for having a Master's isn't that much difference until after a few years of teaching.
     
  5. cruiserteacher

    cruiserteacher Comrade

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    I was forced to get a masters degree because at the university I attended, you were not a licensed teacher with a bachelors. They wanted you to go through their masters program (more $$). I did not, but got mine through another program. This university is the only one in my area (possibly my state) that does this. Unfortunately, this made me unmarketable. I subbed for two years while getting my masters, then another year after getting it before I finally got a position. I am glad I have it, as I see many other teachers struggling through their masters program while working full time, and I did start out at a higher pay scale than my non-masters colleagues. Also, my district offers tuition reimbursement and fee waivers for teachers taking college credit, so you might end up saving some money by waiting.
     
  6. DaveG

    DaveG Companion

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    The majority of districts look for teachers with master's degrees as the pay difference is negligible in the first years. Teachers with master's tend to have a wider skill set, too, and often have additional endorsements.
     
  7. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    We also have tuition reimbursement and fee waivers which is nice, but definitely doesn't cover everything. It does cover about 2 or 3 classes a year though!
     
  8. sunshine*inc

    sunshine*inc Cohort

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    This is something that has been on my mind since I will earn my credential this year. From what I can tell, I have more classroom experience than many of my classmates, but they are planning to get their Masters immediately after earning their credential. I just don't want my lack of a Masters degree to prohibit me from obtaining a position.
     
  9. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    I don't think your lack of a Masters will prohibit you from finding a job! The districts are really looking for experience and recommendations.
     
  10. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Virtuoso

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    Whether you have a masters or not does not matter here. We get an allotment for teachers, and it doesn't matter how much they cost.

    However, in Kentucky you have to start a masters program within 5 years of being hired and finish it within 10 to retain your certification.
     
  11. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    I think most states have some requirements on finishing a Masters. My district stops paying extra after 5 years if you don't make some attempt to get a Masters!
     
  12. MsMar

    MsMar Fanatic

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    Dec 23, 2010

    In the districts around here it seems they value some years of experience and a few prefer Masters while some don't want to pay extra for it. A friend of mine with a Masters was basically told by HR in a school she had done a LTS assignment that she was too expensive to be considered for a full time position. Many PA districts are going to be hit hard next year with the loss of stimulus money and paying in more to the pension system so they might be more interested in less expensive teachers.
     
  13. John Lee

    John Lee Groupie

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    I am holding off on mine.
    Here in CA, I think things are bound to get really shaken up in the next few years. My hope would be that (among the other things) requiring of a Masters would fall by the wayside or something, as unlikely as that probably is...

    From what I've seen, I just think a Masters has shown little/no bearing on teaching ability in the classroom. In other words, the overwhelming majority of teachers I encounter today have their Masters. And I still see teaching that I think is not up to par.

    Hence, I've just put it on the backburner.
     
  14. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Virtuoso

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    And one more thing . . .

    I'm really glad that I got mine early, too. It took me 2 years to get mine, and it cost $3250. I have gotten an extra $3000 per year since I earned it. That's added an extra $39,000 in my bank account since then. Well worth the money.

    Currently the price for a class has a gone from $325 a class to over $1000 per class.
     
  15. DaveG

    DaveG Companion

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    Masters in Education are notorious for being extremely easy, requiring very little academic content knowledge or application of it. Many teachers only do their master's for the pay rise, not for advancement academically, and so colleges begin to cater to this type of thinking.

    Having said that, if you are willing to invest in additional research on your own and keeping up to date on a field, you can really enhance your own teaching practices.
     
  16. paperheart

    paperheart Groupie

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    That wasnt my experience. I have a Masters and it was never a problem to find a job. I do know through insider info passed on to me about a school district near me that they are only hiring new hires with 3 or less years experience to help balance the budget.
     
  17. nasirahc83

    nasirahc83 Companion

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    Well in Baltimore city which is trying the merit pay system. It wont matter if you have a masters or bachelors since pay will be base on merit and student test scores not tenure. So a first year masters and a first year bachelors will be paid the same but in previous years there about a $3,000 difference.
     
  18. DrivingPigeon

    DrivingPigeon Phenom

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    In my area, you earn your bachelor's degree, get a job, get your master's while working, and then you're pretty much locked in that district for your career (unless the budget problems improve). For my position, my principal was only allowed to interview teachers who had just graduated college. My co-workers told me to make sure I want to stay in this district for a while before I get my master's, because no one else will want me. That's how it is here!
     
  19. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    I never worry about NOT getting hired because I'm more costly to employ. The way I look at it is, if something's meant for me, it will be. I'm not going to NOT get a Master's just because I fear not being employed after I get it.

    I got an MA BEFORE I had a teaching job. I was hired that same summer I graduated with it.
     
  20. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    I think that, in your circumstances, that might be the way to go.

    But for many people here, employability needs to be part of the equation. Lots of people here have kids to support and a mortgage or a rent payment to make every month. If an additional degree were to render them too expensive to hire, it would be a huge problem.
     
  21. FarFromHome

    FarFromHome Connoisseur

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    I have my Master's and was just hired over people straight out of college. I know my new school was really impressed that I already have my Master's and Principal Certification when I haven't taught all that long. I think it really helped me get the job. So I think it all depends on the area you're in! I know a district back home that only hires teachers with Master's degrees.
     
  22. bandnerdtx

    bandnerdtx Aficionado

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    Down here, the pay is difference is so minimal that it wouldn't make a difference at all. Years experience is what really bumps you out of the market for some jobs.
     
  23. Teachling

    Teachling Groupie

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    In my district it's the same also but I don't think you see a difference in a few years other than the cost of living increase that would amount to an additional $30 a year on average. So basically, I don't think it makes a difference if you have a Master's or not unless you are shooting for administration or some sort of education support position.

    It's a good thing that I was only responsible for paying books & some small fees when I got mine because I'm definitely not getting much compensation for having one.
     

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