Getting a job is impossible

Discussion in 'Debate & Marathon Threads Archive' started by chiilo, Aug 9, 2012.

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  1. chiilo

    chiilo Rookie

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    Aug 9, 2012

    I'm a 25 year old graduate with a teaching certificate.

    I'm becoming very depressed with my life because I spent so much money on school and becoming a teacher and I can't find a job. I've never so much as even gotten an interview.

    Everyone keeps telling me to sub to "get my foot in the door" but there is no way I can sub and support myself financially. (I'm 100% on my own and I need my full-time job at a daycare to cover my expenses.) If I did sub, I would have to somehow find a part-time job on the side and with the economy right now, quitting my full-time position to look for something else is a huge, unsafe gamble.

    I'm frustrated and a bit jaded. Seems like "unless you know someone", you don't get jobs or interviews in the teaching field.

    I guess I went into this a little naive, thinking the best person for the job is interviewed and chosen, but obviously this is NOT the case and its all a huge game I don't know how to play.

    I continue to apply for external positions in my district but obviously i've never heard back.

    Do I just give up on teaching at this point? :unsure:
     
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  3. Mathemagician

    Mathemagician Groupie

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    Aug 9, 2012

    You do not.

    Have you posted your cover letter or resume for feedback?

    What subject/grade level are you looking to teach?

    What area are you in, and are you willing to move?

    There are threads upon threads like this, and the advice is generally the same; however, if you are a science or math or special education teacher looking for a job, the problem is probably just tweaking the old resume. On the other hand if you are, say, elementary or secondary social studies, you may also have to consider moving or looking in less desirable places for work.

    I never subbed a day in my life nor did I know someone.
     
  4. Mrs.DLC

    Mrs.DLC Comrade

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    I wouldn't give up. Could you relocate? Some areas hire more teachers than others. Good luck. It may be worth waiting for a teaching job if that is what you really want to do. I agree, the best candidate is not always the one hired.Sad, but true.
     
  5. tootgravytrain

    tootgravytrain Comrade

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    That's really true - it's a big nepotisim/cronyism game and it is a game of "who you know." Now, if you are a young good looking woman you shouldn't be having any trouble. Sorry that sounds blunt and sexist - and those who do the hiring will deny that's a factor in hiring - but they are lying. It is a factor.

    As one who was RIFed three times, I learned some stuff and you are NOT as jaded as myself nor my brother who is working on his doctorate in education (His dissertation will be published as a book and he's taking no prisioners).

    Send out resumes everywhere. If you're feeling to stay in one area, you're pretty much screwed. I did regionally and ended up having to drive a year for about an hour one way - but it kept me alive until I got REAL lucky, which leads me to my second point............

    DIVERSIFY! I don't know what your certification is but hey, I never thought about teaching in a prison, but here I am and wished I would have thought of this 25 years ago! It's the best kept secret in teaching. Look at alternative schools.

    Look at other fields. It's a bunker mentality right now and everyone is looking out for themselves and their buds because of the economy and cutbacks. I did and had no qualms about going into other stuff but always at the 11th hour I found "something," and those "somethings" kept me going.

    Had I to do it again at your age - I was also 25 when I finished college - I'd say to hell with it knowing what I know now. In today's world where education is no longer valued in America, with schools struggling financially, I feel I owe it to you to be honest - I'd look into other fields. I made sure ALL FOUR of my kids did NOT go into this field. Thank God they didn't.

    Sorry if this sounds more jaded than you, but someone needs to be truthful. I simply got REAL lucky by the time I was ready to leave it, which I should have done, like I said, years ago.

    Where are you located, and a lot of other factors, can debunk my words fast because there ARE pockets of honesty and people about the right things out there. From what I know - it's getting more rare.
     
  6. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    I understand you're frustrated. I wouldn't suggest you give up trying at all. You never know what might come down the road and I wouldn't throw away all that money I spent on college without giving it my all.

    Two things you posted stuck out to me though.

    You do need to get your name out there somehow. If you absolutely cannot sub (and I haven't seen that work too well for the new graduates I've met anyways) you need to find a way for someone at the schools to know who you are. You teach daycare - that sounds like a pretty good in for an elementary teacher. The kids you teach now are going to be in higher grades soon. Let the parents know what your education is in. If they're involved in their older kids' school, they might just have some info for you. Are any of the daycare parents teachers themselves? Can you volunteer at the school you're interested in? Be upfront - call the school, say you're looking for a job and are interested in that school. Is there any upcoming weekend events where you can help out and learn a bit more about the school climate? Ask some of those daycare moms if they're involved as well.

    The second thing I wanted to comment on was your attitude about who gets the job. Yes, it may be a case of someone's daughter getting the job. But you can never assume that whomever got it WASN'T the "best person." Maybe, just maybe, the reason why you haven't had an interview yet is because the best people are getting those slots. Maybe they shine in a way that you don't. Have you had your resume reviewed by the career center at your college? Maybe it is a matter of someone speaking up for another applicant. If I had a desk full of applications and a couple of my employees said "hey, I know a guy that just applied. He'd be awesome. Let me tell you why he'd work well on our team..." I definitely would take their opinion on the matter.
     
  7. chiilo

    chiilo Rookie

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    Aug 9, 2012

    A few more facts about me:

    -I've been working in childcare to make money, and at this point i'm open to other things as well. It was just always my dream to have my own classroom.

    -I'm in Seattle. I'm living with my fiancee who has a very successful job here and moving is not an option right now. (Might be in a few years.) I have a car so i'm looking into surrounding districts as well but still no luck.

    -I'm certified K-8 but prefer early elementary.

    I appreciate the feedback and honesty. At this point i'm really torn as to what to do so I thought i'd turn to a forum for some perspective.
     
  8. chiilo

    chiilo Rookie

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    That's the problem, not only do I not know anyone, I just don't have the time to volunteer or get myself into a school. I work full-time. I've spoken to daycare parents before about this type of thing but nothing has ever materialized.

    I've had my resume looked at before at my school career center. I student taught in a very challenging urban school and I have many great letters of recommendation. I guess there is just something about me that "doesn't shine" as you said. I really don't know what else I can be doing differently. I understand the need to be aggressive but I guess I just don't have the mentality to figure out how to "play the game," let alone the time and physical energy to get involved somehow in school after caring for a room of toddlers all day.
     
  9. chiilo

    chiilo Rookie

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    Aug 9, 2012

    Additionally, i'm young but not particularly good looking.
     
  10. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    Aug 9, 2012

    You are probably going to need to find something other than your daycare job. Since the hours run right along side a teacher's hours, you are never going to be more than a name on a paper.

    I lived on my own (no roommate) and supported myself between subbing and working full time retail. I worked 3:30-12:00 on weekdays and 7-3:30 on weekends at my retail job. That allowed me to sub and volunteer during the day. Was it easy? Heck no! Was it fun? Absolutely not! But I did what I had to do!
     
  11. tootgravytrain

    tootgravytrain Comrade

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    Aug 9, 2012

    I know nothing about the education situation in the Pacific Northwest, so it's hard to say. I hear it's a lot better in the Atlantic basin in terms of available jobs - your Carolinas and such.

    I'm as jaded as they come, obviously, but really, it's a regional thing in terms of all aspects of education - up to and including hiring.

    Feel it out good before making a decision.
     
  12. Learner4Life

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    Aug 9, 2012

    Are there any Paraprofessional jobs? Subbing isn't the ONLY way to get your foot in the door. All the open jobs in my school have gone to Paras in the district.
    Be OPEN to possibilities. We are going to have an opening this year that will be a combination of Jr. High L.A., P.E. (for the whole school), and possibly some Math classes. Does it sound like fun? NO. Does it get you in the building and possibly open to transfer later? YES
     
  13. Rabbitt

    Rabbitt Connoisseur

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    Aug 9, 2012

    Hey Hey now...you have not had an interview so you know your looks are not the issue!

    I agree with having others see your resume. Even though you have done this at day care already, they are not the school setting you are seeking. Try us? Do you know anyone who got a teaching job recently that will show you theirs? I know when I see a resume I like, I copy it! Sometimes even the format or color/design is attractive.

    Also, hand deliver your resume or letter.
    "Hi, I'm Ms. Chiilo. I am here with my application for the 2nd grade position."
    I can almost guarentee this will get your resume into the 'consider' pile.
     
  14. Myrisophilist

    Myrisophilist Habitué

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    Aug 9, 2012

    Another possibility for getting your foot in the door is to volunteer (or perhaps even be paid?) for a school sport or club as an advisor. That would get you known around the school and wouldn't require a commitment during the school day.
     
  15. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

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    Aug 9, 2012

    Unless your fiancé needs your help paying for the rent/mortgage, then it is possible that you could relocate for a year. Long distance relationships are harder, but that doesn't mean it can't be done. A member of this board got a job quite a distance away for that first year experience. If you got a job in state, you could still spend a lot of time together.

    When is your wedding?
     
  16. Shanoo

    Shanoo Habitué

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    Aug 9, 2012

    I agree that you have to get your name out there somehow. I think that because there are soooo many applicants right now, that if an administrator gets a "hey, I know someone looking for a job. You should talk to them" they more than likely ARE going to talk to them. They already have someone willing to vouch for them. That goes a long way, compared to a piece of paper which, in all reality, doesn't show teaching ability.

    Go into the schools. Meet the administration. My SO and I moved across the country last year. I had a job and he didn't. We knew NOBODY. For the first little bit, he was getting NO sub calls. None. Then, he decided to go into one of the high schools and introduce himself to the administration. The next day they called him in to sub. Then, again. And again. Finally, they liked him so much that they created a position for him. It was a support position and was only for 2 days a week, but it showed that they were invested in him. He was usually able to sub at least 2 out of the other 3 days per week.

    Fast forward a few months and I got an email from my VP. She knew of a 3 month position coming available at yet a different school. She asked me if she could give them SO contact information. She did and SO was called in later that week. He was offered the job on the spot.

    I agree that you may have to find a way to be available to sub. There are very few principals who are going to hire without some kind of experience. My sister just graduated from her program and they told her not to expect a contract for AT LEAST 5 years. That means she's going to have to sub.
     
  17. chiilo

    chiilo Rookie

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    Aug 9, 2012

    Thanks for all the replies. Looks like if i'm serious about this, i'll need to start subbing. I have a lot to think about and consider, especially with finances. Once again, thank you!
     
  18. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Aug 9, 2012

    I'm sorry, but both these quotes are an incredible insult to every one of the 103 people on this forum who have found a job this year. Each and every on of them believes that they got the job because THEY are the best people for those particular positions, and not because of who they know.

    I'm very sorry that you're having such difficulty finding a job. You're in good company-- the job market for teachers has been brutal since 2008 just about everywhere, and forever in areas like metro NYC.

    On behalf of the 103 people on this forum who have found jobs this year, I'll say that I firmly believe that it's NOT about who you know, it's about having a cover letter and resume that make you stand out.

    If you honestly believe that it's all about networking in your area, then of course I have to ask: exactly what ar you doing to get your name out there?? Networking is common in so many professional fields-- how are you planning to become someone who is known??
     
  19. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    Aug 9, 2012

    Completely agree with Alice. I'm 23, just applied for my credential, and know NO-ONE from the district I am working at, but got a job on my own merits. It's all about sticking out.

    It depends on what you teach as well as where you teach.

    My advice would be to keep your full-time job, but keep an active scope out of the field. Chances are, sometime during the year, a teacher will have had enough and call it quits. Then you jump in. That's what I did for my internship.

    Schools are extremely desperate when that happens, that they give interviews to everyone who applies.

    It's odd that you're not even getting interviews though. Have a friend look over your applications and resume and see if there's anything he or she would recommend you change.

    Consider adding certifications onto your credential. I don't know how it is in Washington, but in California, all you have to do is take a test, (costs 70 bucks) and if you pass, you're certified to teach that subject if you already have a credential. (Sounds sketch I know, but it's a god-send for people who decide they need to get into another subject.) Definitely go for math, and science if you can. (middle schools generally like teachers who can teach both.)

    Don't give up, and don't feel defeated. It's a tough economy out there, but if you stand out from the rest of the pack, you will get hired.
     
  20. tootgravytrain

    tootgravytrain Comrade

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    I could cite more examples than I might remember where that's simply not the case. Sure it happens. However, I went to so many "dummy" interviews I still kick myself for going to them because I found out there was already a decision made before the fact, AFTER the fact.

    It's too late in the game for me personally to worry about it anymore and let's face it; anything can happen. But I tried to make it obvious and maybe failed. But to say it doesn't and if you REALLY want to make it, you'd better be aware.
     
  21. chiilo

    chiilo Rookie

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    A close friend of mine attended a "dummy" interview at the school he was long-term subbing at. The panel already knew who they were going to choose, which my friend found out later through word of mouth. Why do schools do this? It's such a game.

    FYI-I did not mean to offend anyone or say that people on this forum aren't good teachers with strong merits. I do know that my classmate who has a Dad in human resources at the district, well she has a job all lined up for the fall and she is the flakiest person I've ever met. :huh:
     
  22. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Do you and your fiancee share household expenses? You said that you're 100% on your own, but you also said that you live with your fiancee. You also said that your fiancee has a very successful job. Maybe it's time to ask your fiancee to take over some of the household expenses so that you can sub, gain experience, and make connections.

    There are jobs out there. It's time to stop making excuses about why you don't have a job and start finding ways to get one. It's not going to be easy, and it might take some time, but it is not "impossible".
     
  23. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Fanatic

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    I don't think Alice is saying that it never happens, she is saying that generalizing is disrespectful to those who have done everything in their power to land a job, and finally did. I know personally I had to have applied to well over 500 jobs (probably way more). I blanketed every school within an hour's drive (public, private, charter) with my cover letter, resume, ect. I hand delivered some to. I had around 30 interviews in NJ in one year, close to 20 for elementary (which many in this area will say is unusual) and I only finally got hired after getting an LTS position in the school last year. Looking for the job is just as hard as the job itself.

    Additionally, you work in a daycare with children so it's not like your out of the field working at McDonald's. By now I would say if you haven't had even an interview it's not because they don't know you, it's because your resume and or cover letter need work. I would suggest your 1st step should be posting them for feedback.

    Not trying to be harsh, just want you to land your dream job and you need to understand what it takes to do so.
     
  24. Rebecca1122

    Rebecca1122 Comrade

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    I agree with AlwaysAttend- looking for a job is a job in itself.

    It's competitive out there. But I got my job at an out of state school where they definitely did not know me. I landed it with my two interviews, recommendations, and cover letter/resume. It was probably about the 100th school I applied to, at least.

    Are you looking at all jobs you are certified? I am also certified K-8 and student taught in elementary ed. Now I teacher middle school science. Is it my dream job? No. But I am putting in my time getting experience in the classroom so I can make the move back down to the little ones where I want to be. And as a bonus, I really love my middle school kids : )

    Check all private schools too- e-mail your resume and cover letter to principals even if there are no job postings. I teach in a private school that did post its job opening, but got an interview call after I accepted that position from a principal I had e-mail that suddenly had an opening come up. You never know when the need will arise.

    I would second the suggestion of looking at para jobs too. I am not the type of person that likes to sub. I can be shy and new situations are hard for me, so going to a new school every day just wasn't my cup of tea. But being a classroom aide or special education para could also get you in the door within a district. I'm not sure how competitive those jobs are honestly, but doesn't hurt to look.

    PS- I also worked full time while I was job hunting at a summer program. I checked the websites every day and sent e-mails/online apps before and after work. Maybe see if you can work your daycare schedule next school year so you could work at an after school program, tutor (even volunteer), or sub part time.
     
  25. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

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    I agree with this. I have encountered so many "sour grapes" conversations with people who have applied in my district and were not interviewed or hired. I even heard one person say that I was a "natural" to be hired because I was a graduate of the district and my dad had an "uppity" position in the community. :rolleyes: (My dad was a foreman at a coal company, by the way.)

    I'm very offended when people insinuate that I'm somehow not qualified for my job. I've been in my district since 1993, and I've never had anything but good evaluations from everyone I've ever worked with . . . and not all of them knew me personally either.

    I supported myself when I subbed. I was single, which helped. I let them know that I was available for whatever, whenever. I subbed 170 of 175 days that school year. Because I didn't have the extra responsibilities of a regular classroom teacher, I could have easily worked a part-time job while I subbed.

    Finding a job is difficult for everyone I know, no matter what field. Don't give up, and don't play the blame game. Keep trying.
     
  26. chiilo

    chiilo Rookie

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    I don't think its fair for you guys to judge my financial situation. By on my own, I mean I do not have parental or outside help. Yes, my other half has what would be considered a successful job but in no way does that mean we can cover our current expenses (rent, school loans, etc) with just one income at this very second. I made some bad choices in my past and took more school loans than I could realistically handle. I'm paying the price for that now.

    We live in Seattle which is a very expensive city to live in but also makes us happy and my fiancee is close to his work.

    The district here is primarily based, as another poster said, on networking. I am exhausted, frustrated, and very, very jaded with the process. It doesn't help that the online application is tedious. (I love kids and teaching, it has nothing to do with that.)

    I'm between a rock and a hard place right now because I cannot afford to quit my job and float around as a sub for an x number of years, getting a once a month paycheck hoping things will happen for me. Also considering things like winter break, were i'd be out of work for 2-3 weeks.

    I'm not attacking ANYONE on this forum for who they are, their merits, or how they got their position. I was just posting to see if anyone had extra insight and i'm sorry if my generalizations came off as offensive. All of the tips I have written down and am taking seriously (i.e. taking another look at my resume, etc.)

    I'm speaking for my district only in that it is very networking based and I just don't have that kind of personality. Starting to look like i'm out of luck right now :mellow: Maybe I *am* making excuses, but i'm just so, so tired of this. I'm mentally exhausted and defeated.
     
  27. MissJill

    MissJill Cohort

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    You need to get in a better mindset, until you do that nothing good will happen. I am one who is against having to substitute to get your name known. I subbed for 2 school districts for two years and it didn't make a difference. Just like you, they knew who they were choosing and it always was someone who knew someone in the district in some way. There are definitely districts like the one you're describing all over the country. However, there are countless more around the country that are the complete opposite. It wasn't until I realized this that I found a job. I finally figured it was time to leave those districts in the past and move on to better things. I put my resume out to over 100 school districts in my state, received a ton of interviews. Some which were fluff because they already had their candidate, some which I was told that I was their second choice, and then one finally that wanted me. You have to remember that every step of the way you are gaining experience. Every interview you go on is a way to improve yourself. If you start thinking, I'm 25 and this is taking too long, then you are going into things with a negative attitude and that's not going to get you anywhere. I graduated college when I was 23 and didn't get my full time job until I was 25. It takes time and a lot of energy, but if you keep up with it, it will eventually go your way.

    You have to be sure that you are constantly looking for ways to make you stand out and be the best candidate possible. Sometimes that involves asking the person on the other end of the phone that just rejected, what more you could have done to have been their top candidate.

    I think I'm babbling now, but don't give up. If you are meant to be a teacher, then put up with the BS now, so you can have a long and happy career.

    And don't ever think that because you feel you aren't the best looking person, that you don't deserve a job.
     
  28. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

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    Here's the thing about hiring someone you know. Because test scores are so important to schools nowadays, they actually want to make sure they are getting someone good in the classroom. I KNOW that districts passed up on candidates who was well known and had connections only because they didn't have the best reputation. And, with so many applicants for one job, the districts get to pick the best of the best.

    YES! It is about connections and networks to get that interview. But, from then on, you need to sell yourself. A friend of mine student taught and worked as a teacher on special assignment for this one district. She knows Spanish fluently too, which is a plus in California. She has been able to get interviews, but can't land a job. Why? She has pretty poor classroom management skills. She's a great teacher, but isn't firm enough.

    But, right now, even I, who has 6 years of classroom experience, who was nominated teacher of the year, who has excellent teaching skills, classroom management, tons of letters of recommendations, etc etc etc, can't even land a full time teaching job in CA (due to moving to a new area). Over 300 people are applying to one opening. It's tough.
     
  29. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

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    Aug 10, 2012

    "Optimism is the faith that leads to achievement. Nothing can be done without hope and confidence."
    ~Helen Keller
     
  30. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    I certainly wasn't trying to "judge" your financial situation. I was asking questions and offering a potential solution. You don't seem to be interested in that solution, and that's fine. It doesn't mean that I'm somehow being judgmental of you or your situation. It just means that you don't like my advice and don't want to do what I think you should do.

    You yourself have said that networking matters in Seattle. You've also pretty much said that you don't want to network. I guess that settles the issue, then. If networking is what it takes and you don't want to do what it takes, then I think you should start looking in another field.

    Dream jobs don't just come to people. You have to work for it. That means different things for different people in different situations, but it almost always means that you need to get your foot in the door, meet people, and put yourself out there. It also often means that you need to sub. Many people find ways to make subbing work, sometimes with an afternoon/evening/weekend job. I am quite familiar with the job market for teachers in Seattle. I guess I feel like there are many options out there for you, but you have to be willing to do some work, even if you don't want to.
     
  31. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

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    If you really want something, you'll find a way; if you don't, you'll find an excuse.

    I have that quote on a poster in my classroom.
     
  32. BioAngel

    BioAngel Science Teacher - Grades 3-6

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    Aug 10, 2012

    Have you looked at private schools? I work at one and I love it- and I can afford to live off of my salary. I used a company to help me land both of my positions, so if you're interested in learning about the company just let me know (via pm). :)
     
  33. tootgravytrain

    tootgravytrain Comrade

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    Aug 10, 2012

    And to say THAT doesn't go on is to avoid reality. Like I said, it's a bunker mentality in many areas of cuts and cutbacks and you can rese assured that "me, myself, I and mine" come before ability. No one need tell me any different - been there and done that. I wasn't hired for a job OVER a principal's secretary. Nuff said.
     
  34. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Aug 10, 2012

    Then I guess the discussion is pretty much over.
     
  35. tootgravytrain

    tootgravytrain Comrade

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    Aug 10, 2012

    Discuss until Rapture if you want and I'll roll with it. Look, when I worked in juvenile lock up for 10 years and suspension schools for 8, you know who I worked with mostly as peers? Principals, assistant principals and superintendents on a daily basis. Without boring anyone as to the details, it was them on a regional basis whom my facilities served, thus I had to work with them.

    Not only that, my brother was a principal for 12 years until he couldn't take it anymore and went into college professorship. I know for a fact my brother was given the Scarlet Letter because he once hired the BEST person for a job when everyone else had someone else chosen. He was doomed and left because no one ever let him forget it.

    I know a lot of principals who didn't get the people they wanted because of "inside" pressure, or, basically because they were outnumbered by "the panel." I can also tell you a story about two teachers hired over me who since gotten into legal trouble (internet porn on the job) and another who was "institutionalized" because of mental trouble.

    Hell, don't take my word for it. I'm just telling you what I've seen being in a unique position of being a teacher so many years but basically having administrators as my peers and family. There's much I wish I didn't know.

    And I'm in no way stupid enought to think that's the case with EVERY hire. But I'd bet the farm it goes on enough that it should be distrubing to us.
     
  36. Shanoo

    Shanoo Habitué

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    Aug 10, 2012

    I don't know how the online application in your district works, but I do know that the one in mine is based on a points system. What that means is that a computer program will go through the application and assign points to each answer you give. Then, the top 3-5 candidates get interviews.

    If your program is similar, that MAY be a reason why you're getting not calls for interviews. If your name doesn't happen to be in that top group, a principal may not have even gotten your information.

    I'm not the type of person who would network, either so I get that. But, I think it may be necessary. Get a bunch of business cards printed, take one day and hit every school in your area. Talk to the principal or VP. Tell them you're ready and able to work. Leave them a stack of your business cards.

    I know this is probably not what you want to hear, but in every district I've worked in, it's nearly impossible to get a job without doing some sub work first. Especially in the district I'm in now, with the online application. Someone with no experience wouldn't make it past the first round.
     
  37. tootgravytrain

    tootgravytrain Comrade

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    Aug 10, 2012

    In Ohio, we have through the Ohio Department of Ed website the ability to send out application and resume to their data base, and anyone looking for a teacher can get on it to look at candidates. It worked for me well - I got tons of interviews. Some I didn't even attend because I knew the fix was already in after talking to the person on the phone, and most told me when I asked them if they already had their person to not waste either of our time.

    BUT - it did save my a&& for a year because I got a crummy job that way that kept me "alive" while I was going through this 9 month process of getting to teach in the prison.

    You'd be amazed - I got a lot of interviews with stuff outside education as well as many in correctional settings I didn't even respond to because even Rambo wouldn't teach in some of those places (juvenile prisons).

    But what I'm saying is that the internet is a GREAT mass-job search tool. It's somewhat time-consuming but it sends you out there.
     
  38. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Aug 10, 2012

    OP, have you personally dropped off your resume at every single public, private, religious and charter school within an hour's drive? It's one easy way to be "that nice young teacher who was just here."

    How's your cover letter??? Does it scream "YOU" or could it just as easily belong to a dozen other people on this forum?? (hint: if you can count 4 buzzwords, it needs to be revamped.)

    If it turns out that you don't get something this year, you have a whole year ahead of you to network. Go to the plays, volunteer to work homecoming, work on the penny auction-- become that person who DOES know people. Start with the dad of that friend: ask if he would walk in your resume.

    My point is that all these little things may get your resume looked at. From that point, it's all up to you.
     
  39. Mathemagician

    Mathemagician Groupie

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    Aug 10, 2012

    I'd imagine saying this to an interviewer, whether or not they already had someone in mind, would easily sway them in another direction.
     
  40. tootgravytrain

    tootgravytrain Comrade

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    Aug 10, 2012

    Fine by me. If they were serious about calling someone that REALLY had a shot, it shouldn't make a difference. It's surprising how honest some are. What's wrong with asking if someone else already has an "inside track?" What's wrong with a little honesty in this world? I had many say "Well yea, we have a person in mind, but we would like to talk to others." I know it sounds cynical and defeatist, but hell, it happens.
     
  41. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    Aug 10, 2012

    Alright. To quote my favorite Olympic commercial, "Luck doesn't get you to the Olympic Games. You can't wish your way on to the podium. You can't buy it or hope for it. It's not enough to dream about it. Luck didn't get me to London. I swam here."- Ryan Lochte

    As people have said, searching for a job IS a job. I was trying to relocate back to my home state, which I would say is definitely in the top-5 hardest markets (I would bet it is 2 or 3). I looked at every single school (public, private, charter) within a 90 minute drive. I have over 150 websites bookmarked (which consists of over 200 school districts), and I checked them DAILY. For every position I applied to (I didn't count, but I'm guessing 300-400 [applicants are in the thousands per position]), I emailed the principal a individualized email. I went online and read newsletters, school improvement plans, technology plans, teacher websites, etc... In my email, I made connections with a program (or programs) that I have specifically used. I also tried to compliment them on something cool I saw.
    When I was looking out of state 5 years ago, I went through three ROLLS of stamps (300), and that doesn't include emails and online applications!! (I decided to relocate after subbing for a year and a half with no luck)
    Searching for a job is exhausting and frustrating. But you have to persevere. Good luck.
     
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