"Get out now"

Discussion in 'Behavior Management' started by Christine3, Sep 28, 2007.

  1. Christine3

    Christine3 Cohort

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    Some of the teachers on this forum may too use that phrase. I do NOT. Many teachers use "Get out now" to a child that is disrupting a class. I find this very ineffective to send a child out in the hallway for disrupting the class. The teacher next to my classroom does this all the time. How is the child going to learn from this?
     
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  3. Poisontipped

    Poisontipped Rookie

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    Hmm, interesting question. I personally am not a big fan of the word "get" used in that context, sometimes it can sound rude, and i'd rather say something else.

    In terms of children playing up in the classroom, if I want them to go outside and cool down. I will simply look at them (teacher look) and say "outside" and they know what I mean. Or I will say "You can go outside for 5 minutes for disrupting my class" if they don't know. It really depends on the what the children have done, or whether they are generally disruptive or if it's a one off.

    Hope I helped!
     
  4. Kat53

    Kat53 Devotee

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    I personally don't think you should ever send a kid unsupervised outside of your classroom. Who's to say they won't get mad, and leave campus, or even roam around. If that student is in my classroom, he or she is my responsibility- and I don't want to pay the consequences if something happens when they are out of my eyesight. I think there are better alternatives, such as implementing your discipline plan or sending them to a neighboring teachers room.
     
  5. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    I think the only time I would ever use that phrase would be in a fire drill.

    I've never sent a student from my class. In our school (and the only other school where I've ever taught) it simply isn't done, or at least for the types of circumstances I've ever come across.
     
  6. Mrs LC

    Mrs LC Comrade

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    I wouldn't send a child "out" - it's the naughty ones you have to keep close and completely supervised! Although I do remember once shoving a poor, green child out the door with a brisk, "Out" and putting a bin under their mouth - caught the vomit and the carpet stayed clean!

    We have a "green card" at our school - if a child needs to be removed (ie for serious stuff, not just for general disruption) then we send the green card to the office with a responsible child and the principal/deputy/someone will come and remove the child to the office. Depending on the problem or offence they will either calm the child for return to the classroom or call parents to collect the child.
     
  7. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Sep 29, 2007

     
  8. merigold78

    merigold78 Cohort

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    i have put kids out in the hallway before, but never really used the phrase "get out." i think all teachers have a breaking point, and let's get real...some kids know just what to do/say/act like to get you there. i think as long as the child has work to do and you keep an eye on him/her it's no big deal.

    i have a "buddy system" w/the two other teachers in my grade. we pretty much have an open door, if a child is driving you nuts send him/her to me, policy. it makes you feel supported AND also keeps the onry ones out of the principal's office (where usually nothing is done, anyways).

    just my two cents!!

    -meri
     
  9. ddb23

    ddb23 Companion

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    To a student, "Get out now" translates as "You win. I can't control you and you have found my breaking point."

    I imagine that the teacher who is doing that is doing it pretty frequently.

    db
     
  10. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    I've used that phrase once--when a student stood up in class and yelled at me, "Are you being racist again?" when I told him he needed to stop making threats against other students ("So, you wanna go?"--his words). I was insulted and hurt and lost my cool, admittedly, and I'm not proud of it. This was the straw that broke the camel's back with this student, who used racism as an excuse for not working or following classroom expectations. "Get out now" in my case did not mean, "You win", it meant, "You have crossed the line and do not deserve to be in this room right now and need to go to talk to administration".
     
  11. MissFrizzle

    MissFrizzle Virtuoso

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    Not necessarily. As Mrs. C illustrated, everyone has a breaking point. A colleauge of mine, a very good teacher, told me a story about a former student where no matter how much she tried nothing worked.... and she lost her cool. Not proud of it, but it happened.
     
  12. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Mrs. C, I think any teacher that was put in your situation would have done the same thing. If the student is calling you racist and is using it as an excuse, then he/she does not need the privilege of being in the classroom.
     
  13. Yank7

    Yank7 Habitué

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    Perhaps setting up a time out area might work when a child is so disruptive they need a break from the present setting You might also try sending the child with a note and a responsible monitor to a fellow teacher asking if the child could stay with them for a little while until you both have had a chance to cool down.
    Everyone of us have lost their cool at a child whose rude behavior has totally disrupted the class.Wouldn't it be nice if a school cared as much about a child's disruptive behavior as it does about their phony test scores.Maybe then we wouldn't have children who have been huge behavior problems throughout their entire school career.
     
  14. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Bravo, Yank! :clap:
     
  15. MissFrizzle

    MissFrizzle Virtuoso

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    YES!:2up:
     
  16. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    High-stakes testing isn't an issue here, so, while we are concerned with data showing student improvement, behaviour doesn't need to take a back seat. A change in location, either within the classroom or in another room is the usual practice in my school, but, in extreme cases, a student's presence in the room is a "toxic" situation and we must call upon a higher authority. (The student I spoke about was suspended for his behaviour and was, unfortunately, ultimately withdrawn from my program because he--and his mother--would not accept that my behaviour standards are the same for everyone.
     
  17. Steph-ernie

    Steph-ernie Groupie

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    I sent a child outside last week, and I think the phrase I used was "step outside". I have windows right beside my doors so I could still see him, and I was so frustrated with him at that moment, that if he had stayed in the room, I would have exploded all over everything. Seriously - I think the class would have been scraping little pieces of their teacher off the walls! :mad: By sending him outside for a few minutes (He was out for maybe 3 minutes), I was able to calm down and deal with him in a more appropriate way when I asked for him to come back in. I'm certain that if I had dealt with him right away, instead of allowing myself to breathe first, I would have probably resorted to yelling at him - something I never want to do.
     
  18. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    I have said "You need to leave now" to a student.

    One of my students entered the classroom tardy, screamed (SCREAMED!) at me when I asked her to sign the tardy form [school policy]. After she was done screaming at me, she walked over to her desk at the back of the room, kicked and pushed desks and backpacks out of the way, and told every single person what a "f-ing b" and "m-n-effer" I was.

    By telling that student to leave the room, I was ensuring the safety of my students and, frankly, myself. I didn't lose my cool, I wasn't giving up control.... I was removing an already-volatile student whose behaviors were escalating. Let's not forget that I teach in a school where we regularly remove weapons from students.

    Sometimes sending a student out of the classroom is the only safe option. Obviously, the child needs to have a destination. When I told the student to leave now, I was really telling her to go to the deans' office (which she did).
     
  19. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Cassie, can I just give you big :hugs:? You deserve a lot more of them I'm sure. I know there are schools like that around. I have never been in a situation like that. You truly are a mentor!
     
  20. Malcolm

    Malcolm Enthusiast

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    Just have to say something about being called a racist...

    I teach in a school in a low-income area that is about 1/3 African-American, 1/3 Hispanic, 1/3 Asian and about 1 white kid in a class. I am white, male. I have been called a racist for giving consequences to non-white kids. My response is something along the line of "You think I am racist? Then why am I teaching here, instead of teaching at a white, middle class school in my own neighborhood that I could walk to? Why am I teaching here making a 1/3 of what I could be making in the computer business?" That shuts them up. Only need to do it once for each class. No need to throw anybody out.

    Interestingly, in one of the classes, the one, usually well behaved, white girl had started to act up so she would be included in the consequences. Go figure!
     
  21. Yank7

    Yank7 Habitué

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    I am not surprised the one white girl has started to act up. She probably feels pressured to do so to fit in with her classmates.She has been placed in a very difficult position.
    Peer Pressure in Junior High and High School can be very difficult to avoid.
     
  22. merigold78

    merigold78 Cohort

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    as i stated earlier, every teacher has a breaking point....and some children are EXCELLENT button pushers! i am looked upon as one of the best teachers in my school (or so i've been told :)), and even i occcasionally get kids that i have no idea what to do with (see 'out of control child' post!!). i honestly think we're just gettting a lot of kids nowadays that have MAJOR issues. i believe that some of these stem from a lack of parenting, but there are obviously other factors involved too.

    nevertheless, you can awesome at teaching (which most of us are!) and still have an obnoxious child that puts you over the edge sometimes. it happens!

    -meri
     
  23. ddb23

    ddb23 Companion

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    I guess I misspoke (mis-wrote) earlier....Obviously there are some certain situations where a student should be sent out immediately and have the administration deal with it. In our school, there are two types of teachers - those who write referrals and those who don't. Quite quickly referrals can be rendered useless - a kid pushes a teacher's buttons and gets sent out for something small. Not much the administration can do in that situation. On the other hand, if it's part of your policy that a student gets an office referral after xx disruptions, then that should be the case. But if "get out now" is something that the kids hear frequently and the kid comes back to class without a major punishment, then the referral is useless. The classroom should be managed in such a way that disruptions are not tolerated, but also so that getting sent out has serious consequences. We've all got our buttons that can be pushed, and so do the kids, but we're supposed to be the cool, calm professionals.

    good luck - teaching is tough...

    db
     
  24. Cthdenver

    Cthdenver Rookie

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    I think just the opposite holds true - It is a privilege to be in the classroom. I send a kid out many times without his work. Then they tell me that they dont know how to do it so I tell them you have earn the right to sit in the classroom. If you do not earn that right your out. I tell the kids to find a friend or parent who can help them with the work or else they get a zero. Of course I make sure to tell the parent so hopefully the parent helps him get caught up on his assignment. However in my classroom going out is not by any means winning. Also I just want to add what I would send a kid out for :

    Here are some things that I had over the past few weeks:

    1. We are in the middle of a test or an important assignment and I let the class know if you can not behave you may not have the right to be here.

    2. Constantly being out of the seat (sometimes going out for a small walk is better in this case anyways)

    3. As I say in Yiddish very CHUTZPAH behavior. For example I had a time in the first week were I said to the class WHY DO I HEAR TALKING HERE? and one kid decided to speak up and say BECAUSE YOU HAVE EARS. - I will never let a child get away with an remark that completely undermines the whole class. And I have a saying which my class knows - If you can not be the example I will make you one.

    Thats pretty much what I send out for.
     
  25. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

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    I sent a child into the hallway on Monday of last week. He was crawling under his desk while I was reading a book that we were using for a lesson on setting. He had to go sit outside the classroom until I had time to deal with his behavior. After the students were working on an independent assignment, I went to talk with him. The rest of the week, he was a model student.
     
  26. merigold78

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    cthdenver-i can so relate to kids making smart aleck comments like that! i too agree that you simply cannot put up w/it...what kind of message are you sending to the other children if you do?? most of the teachers in my building are pretty strict w/discipline. our school is pretty poor, and many of the children come from broken/chaotic/highly disfunctional homes. basically you're either a witch and they listen to you....or you're nice and they walk ALL OVER YOU! which would you pick??!!

    -meri
     
  27. Cthdenver

    Cthdenver Rookie

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    Well reading through alot of books on child physiology - one thing I relizied is that when dealing with a group as a whole you have to be tough however when your dealing with the kid privately try to be as nice as possible. Tell the kid how you fell and explain to the kid why what he did was not right etc. etc. . When you do it like this the class learns ... the kid learns.. and the kid is not upset with you.
     
  28. TeacherShelly

    TeacherShelly Aficionado

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    Several people have said it is a privilege to be in the classroom. School attendance is mandatory. It's not really a privilege, in the sense of being something one must earn.
     
  29. cmw

    cmw Groupie

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    Personally I do not feel comfortable sending kids into the hall, but it is done at my school. I do behavior tickets where the students answer questions about what they were doing and why it was a problem etc... I have another set that involves reviewing classroom rules. I also hold students after class to discuss their actions during class. If thr problem persists I have detention in my room (during recess) and call home. Conferencing has worked for 98% of the students. I definitely agree with the above postings about talking nicely and adult like when you are 1 on 1 with a kid. Many of my students just don't realize how distracting they are or how annoying tappy hands and feet are! I have also found that some students just want more attention and this results in bad attitudes every time they are not picked. These conferences have really diffused this. :2cents:
     
  30. Cthdenver

    Cthdenver Rookie

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    I will have to disagree on that. Children do have to go to school. Children do not have to have Success in school. If a child wants a means in which to archive and succeed then he knows that he has to be in the classroom. In order to be in the classroom then he must follow whats is required of him in order to do so. Thus being in the classroom is a privilege that is granted to students who can follow as they are supposed to.
     
  31. dreaming_luke

    dreaming_luke Rookie

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    Years ago when I was teaching middle school Grades 7-9 I had a boy in my class who was constantly disrupting my teaching and other student's trying to do their work. One day I said "go", and the smart behind that he was, thought I was meant to go downtown wander around for the afternoon and get caught stealing at a local store. And ...... you guessed it..... the parent blamed it on me as well. Quack! Quack!:lol::lol: At a meeting that I had with this woman about her kid not doing anything in my class, she told me he didn't know that he was behind, OK you'd have to be blind to see my huge assignment charts in my class that are updated hourly, and she said that I had called her son a "stupid idiot". I probably felt like it but I would never say it. I said things she was saying never happened, and she asked if I was calling her son a liar. Well she asked the question and I answered it... yes I am. She lost it and I excused myself from the meeting which should have been stopped long before. How many quacking ducks do you have in your school???
     
  32. ValinFW

    ValinFW Comrade

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    I don't put kids in the hall on a regular basis, but I do send them out on occasion. The way I see it, if they are allowed to continue to be disruptive, they win. How is it fair to the other 28 kids in the room, who have 50 minutes to get the lesson, for me to keep stopping and correcting one child's behavior? If I send a kid out, I usually give him my best "teacher" look, and say, "Hall." After I've finished the lesson...which may be 2 minutes or 20 minutes later...I'll go to the hall and have a conference with him. I have told students to "Get out," but only if they were being completely disrespectful. For instance, the kid last year who told me, "You're so immature," when I wouldn't let him keep the 20 rubberbands that he had on his wrist. I'm not stupid. I knew he was going to use them to shoot paper "hornets" at other kids, because I had already caught him at it the day before. He ended up with an office referral. It would have stopped there, but when I gave him his referral and he yanked it out of my hand and called me a racist, I marched him down to the office myself and told the AP that he would not be allowed back in my room (there were only 2 weeks of school left). He spent the rest of the year in ISS.
     
  33. dust bunny

    dust bunny Rookie

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    Oct 13, 2007

    Sending child out of room

    Just this past week, for the first time, I sent a student out of my room to the office with a note explaining that he had interrupted my instruction 4 times during a science lesson and was prohibiting the rest of the students in my room from learning. He stayed at the office for the remainder of the afternoon.

    This leads to the comments about school being mandatory and not a privilege. School is for learning and to prepare children to be productive adults. I think that one problem we have in today's society is that the rights of children who come to school and disrupt the learning environment come before the rights of the students who come to school to learn.
     
  34. GrandHighWitch

    GrandHighWitch Companion

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    I have two boys in my class who get so disruptive that they are not just annoying ME, they are actually keeping the rest of the class from being able to focus and learn. It's not fair to the rest of the kids to allow them to stay in the room and keep disrupting if nothing else I have tried works. So I give them a choice. "You can either stop this behavior now, or you can leave the classroom and come back when you can handle being here."

    The sixth grade teacher down the hall has a desk at the back of her room, facing the wall, where there is a pile of incident reports for students who get in trouble to fill out. If I have a student who is too disruptive to be in my room, I take him or her there. The student has to fill out the behavior report and show it to the sixth grade teacher before he can return to my class. I always tell the teacher that if my kids are disruptive in HER class, to send them back, because I don't want them distracting her kids, but she says they never are. I think the intimidation factor of being a fourth grader in a room full of sixth graders who know you are in trouble is too much for them to act up. I have a similar place in my room where that teacher can send her kids if they can't handle being in sixth grade and need to come back to fourth for awhile. This system works out really well - I know my kids hate going there, so if that is one of the options, they always choose the other option - to knock off the behavior.

    I sometimes send kids to the hallway, but only if I know I can trust them to actually sit there, and only if I'm at a point where I know I can walk by my door and peek out fairly often to check on them. The other teacher's room works out a lot better because they are being supervised and cannot goof off.
     
  35. Yank7

    Yank7 Habitué

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    Dust Bunny I couldn't agree with you more. It is time we started doing something to make sure every child has the right to learn in a productive and peaceful environment. Then we can begin to think about no child left behind!
     
  36. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    After having your students watch the Oprah show of her academy opening in Africa they just might realize that school, required or not, is in deed a privilege.

    Okay, so technically perhaps it isn't a privilege, but...you get the point.
     
  37. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    When I send a student out in the hall I put a positive spin on it. Very calmly I say, "John, I'm going to allow you to step out in the hallway so you can chill out for a couple of minutes. No big deal - just take a little break so you can come back in and be productive." Amazingly, it works every time.
     
  38. teachercat

    teachercat Rookie

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    I do send students out, but it happens very rarely. They have to run through my entire discipline plan:
    • Warning
    • Lunch Detention
    • Parent Call
    • Office Referral (and out the door)
    At that point, I have 29 other students who really need to learn some math.
     
  39. Ms.Jasztal

    Ms.Jasztal Maven

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    We are not permitted to sit students out in the hallway, period, though I send students who are being highly disruptive to the office with an administrator or guidance counselor. It has happened once this year and maybe twice last year. However, some kids just do this to avoid work.
     
  40. TeachersPet

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    Stay Put!!

    I used to be one of those teachers that would chase a child out if they were misbehaving, but I soon found out that this was exactly what they wanted. Why sit in class if you can walk around the halls doing nothing at all? I have found that putting the disruptive learners at the back of the class, instead of sending them out, or even putting them in front, has decreased the disruption in my class tremendously. When they are misbehaving at the back, the learners in front can still concentrate on what you are saying.

    By sending the 'naughty' ones out, you are only allowing them to disrupt every teacher in the same corridor as you. you are not solving the problem but making it worse for you colleagues.

    It is also best to try alternative forms to combat disruptive behaviour.
     
  41. monsieurteacher

    monsieurteacher Aficionado

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    Oct 21, 2007

    I only use the halls for kids that need a chance to calm down, while I am in the middle of teaching the rest of the class something. Then once I have the students working, I go out in the hall and we have a little chat, and then we start fresh. This works quite well. I would never send a "flight risk" out in the hall, and I wouldn't use the phrase "get out now" either.
     

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