General ?s

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by hm52347, Apr 29, 2009.

  1. hm52347

    hm52347 New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2009
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0

    Apr 29, 2009

    As a possible future special ed teacher, I am wondering:
    a. how do you compare a special education classroom to a regular classroom. What size classes do you typically teach?
    b. do you typically teach students with mild to moderate disorders or severe? Which disorders are the most common in your classrooms?

    Thanks so much
     
  2.  
  3. WaterfallLady

    WaterfallLady Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2006
    Messages:
    2,061
    Likes Received:
    2

    Apr 29, 2009

    I have 12 mild-moderate students. In most general ed. classes, 24 kids would be considered a small class.

    Most common disorders in my classroom are SLD, ADD and Aspergers. I have other students with low cognitive abilities and physical disabilities. Also, a few of my students have secondary mental health diagnoses.
     
  4. SpecSub

    SpecSub Comrade

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2007
    Messages:
    322
    Likes Received:
    0

    Apr 29, 2009

    In my current school, all of our children are in general ed classrooms all day and we plug in to support them. This is the case with MR, autism, speech disorders, emotional disabilites and unspecified learning disabilities. Most of the children are mild-moderate, but I've seen two that would be considered severe.

    In my previous school, we had moderate-severe/profound disabilities. There were 6-7 children and two adults in my room. The children had Downs Syndrome, autism, cerebral palsy and/or genetic birth defects, hydrocephalus, and unexplained mental retardation.
     
  5. excitedteacher

    excitedteacher Rookie

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2007
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    0

    May 21, 2009

    I'm new to teaching and have a lot of questions I'm not clear about. I did my observation with a self contained autism group and absolutely loved it. But I have to realize the odds of me getting into a setting like that is slim. For my internship and when I apply for a special education position to a specify what area I want to teach. I found life skills very interesting as well and I found that I have a lot of creative ideas to bring to the table. There are so many different categories of special education. Can someone help me break them all down. I would greatly appreciate it.
     
  6. lucylucy

    lucylucy Rookie

    Joined:
    May 20, 2009
    Messages:
    94
    Likes Received:
    0

    May 21, 2009

    The past four years I have been working as a resource teacher. I had students in my room anywhere from a 10 minute check in at the beginning of the day to 41/2 hours. Most of my kids had a learning disability, several an emotional disability, some physical disability (ADHD mostly), I have one cognitively delayed student. My caseload is currently 20.

    Next year, however, I am switching to a self contained first grade classroom with 14 kids and two teacher aides. On my class list I have cognitive disability, physical disability (blind, two are partly deaf), speech/language (severe kids, not very verbal) Those kids will gradually increase the time they are in the general education classroom - starting with lunch and specials and working from there. The goal for most of them in inclusion will not be academic but more for building social and communication skills; although some will be more academic.

    I am in Colorado and the categories for special ed services are:
    SIED (emotional disabilities)
    PCD (Perceptual/Communicative or the old term was LD)
    Speech/Language
    SLIC (cognitive disability)
    PD (physical disability)
    Multiple Disabilities
    Preschool (until age 6 and you can figure out what is going on more)
    Vision
    Hearing

    Hope that helps!
     
  7. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2007
    Messages:
    1,872
    Likes Received:
    1

    May 21, 2009

    In TX we had:
    Special needs (medically fragile)
    Life skills (severe to profound)
    BAC unit (behavior adjustment class ED/BD)
    PPCD (ages 3-6 preschool program for children with disabilities)
    Self contained (moderate to severe)
    STAR class (autism)
    Resource (mild moderate - pull out for extra help with subjects)
    CMC (content mastery center-- kids go as needed to get help)
    Inclusion classes (sped teacher along side reg ed teacher in typical class)

    In NJ we have:
    Multiple disabilities (typically more severe kids)
    LLD (language and learning disabilities class, can be mild/mod or mod/sev)
    Autism class (autism only )
    Emotional support (ED/BD)
    Resource
    Inclusion/ in class support
     
  8. excitedteacher

    excitedteacher Rookie

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2007
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    0

    May 22, 2009

    Wow, thank you both very much. =) this is very helpful information to me. I appreciate your time.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

Total: 381 (members: 1, guests: 354, robots: 26)
test