General questions about subbing

Discussion in 'Substitute Teachers' started by kilikena0310, Jun 19, 2009.

  1. kilikena0310

    kilikena0310 Companion

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    Jun 19, 2009

    I have some questions about subbing, and I'm hoping those of you who have subbed before can help me. I've just about given up all hope of finding a teaching job for the coming school year. Absolutely nothing is open where I live. An area I've always wanted to move to seems to always have sub jobs advertised online and in the papers. I'm not sure how much of that is actual demand, since it seems like I've read on here where people are having a hard time getting sub jobs.

    Part of me is seriously considering moving there in hopes of getting sub jobs and more experience. However, I'm very reserved about it because I would have to get my own apartment. If they are as desperate for subs as they make it seem, it might be OK because I could most likely get a job every day. I'm also not opposed to tutoring in the evenings to make some extra money.

    The ad says the pay is $65 to $85 depending on the district. Does this seem normal? I have no idea what the average district pays. Have you been able to get jobs whenever you want them? Or has it been very difficult to get sub jobs this year? Also, what do you do now that summer is here and school is out?

    Any information anyone can give me about subbing will be greatly appreciated!
     
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  3. MrsS2009

    MrsS2009 Rookie

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    Jun 19, 2009

    I subbed this past year while in Grad. School and I got paid $70 a day at both school districts I subbed in. I live in Arkansas. Which that sounds about the same you'd get paid. I didn't sub every day of the week b/c of my classes, but I did get called a lot to sub (especially getting to know the secretary pretty well). During the first part of the school year, I didn't get called very much. It started to pick up around the middle of October, beginning of November. I did stay busy until after Spring Break though. Then it died down a lot. However, I know it is different every year and in every school. It would be great if you could find a long term sub position for a teacher on maternity leave or something. That way you'd be guaranteed something permanent for a while. Good luck in whatever you decide to do and good luck finding that teaching job! Also, subbing was not my favorite thing to do b/c every day was new and some classes were more difficult then others. However, it gave me great experience and I would take a notebook with me to write down really good ideas that I saw in the classroom that I wanted to do. I just got my first teaching job and I have my notebook out looking at all of the neat ideas that I saw and want to do in my room as well!
     
  4. Kangaroo22

    Kangaroo22 Virtuoso

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    Jun 20, 2009

    I get paid $104 a day and it goes up after working 20 days (doesn't have to be in a row), 50 days, 5 days in a row for the same teacher and at 20 days in a row for the same teacher you get teacher pay retroactive to your first day in that assignment. Subbing can be steady work, but you never know how much you're going to work. I don't know if I would move for subbing, but if it's some place you want to move anyway, then go for it if you can afford it, although I would probably get a night and weekend job so that you know you're going to have money coming in. And subbing isn't something that I particularly enjoyed, mainly because of the complete unpredictability of it, but it isn't too bad and it's a good way to make connections. Good luck with your decision and I wouldn't give up on getting a teaching position yet, but having a back-up plan is always a good idea!
     
  5. HeatherY

    HeatherY Habitué

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    Jun 20, 2009

    I think pay really depends on where you are. I have been in places from $88 a day and here it is $159 a day. You really have to just figure out if you could live on working x number of days a month. From my experience, it takes awhile to "break into" subbing. (I have always been in districts without automated calls.) It might be awhile before the staff and teachers get to know you and request you and actually pick up the phone and call you. If you can swing it, and are willing to tutor or get a night job if you aren't getting enough work, then go for it.
     
  6. azure

    azure Companion

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    Jul 8, 2009

    I've been subbing for 7 years, so I work every day. Our pay is $80/day for a B.S. degree, $90 for a masters.

    We use the automated system AESOP. Once you get teachers who like your work, they'll put you on their "favorites" list and then AESOP contacts those favorites first.

    If the school district doesn't use an automated system and they are still advertising for subs, I would think you'd be all right after a couple of months.

    Our system did get quite a few people after the holidays who applied to sub due to losing their jobs. But it seemed to me that some of those quickly dropped out. Maybe they found employment or they realized that subbing is a lot harder than they thought and decided it wasn't for them.

    Good luck.
     

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