Gaining a princpial job

Discussion in 'General Education' started by David DiCaprio, Apr 19, 2018.

  1. David DiCaprio

    David DiCaprio Rookie

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2017
    Messages:
    21
    Likes Received:
    3

    Apr 19, 2018

    Growing up most people dream of being a rock star, athlete, or even the President. For me it was always principal, well I have to admit a major league baseball star would have been fine too, but you get my point. Principals have the tremendous job of actually making the difference in students lives and directly influencing their teachers to meet the needs of all students. Dreams can come true, but it is quite a journey to get there. You have completed two principal internship's, pushed through 45 or so credits, and continued to grow as an educational leader (while working 40 hours a week). Now is the time to strike and do what you are meant to do, be an educational leader. The road to get here was long and hard but truly beneficial. You spent hours looking at Act 82-1 forms, reviewing school laws, understanding school investigations, reading data and interpreting it, and so much more. Now is the time you are ready to "spread your wings and fly." There is one problem, you are a little fish in a big pond. There are many principal candidates applying to the same jobs as you. You question yourself: "Is my resume okay?", "Do I need to know someone?", "How can I stick out better?" I personally find myself asking these and many other questions. So the real question here is, what can you do and what should you do to land your first principal job? For educational leaders, administrators, and principals what are your suggestions? The journey can be long and hard, but I would love to hear your story to make it to your ultimate goal?

    Please post advice

    Thank you, David DiCaprio
     
  2.  
  3. David DiCaprio

    David DiCaprio Rookie

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2017
    Messages:
    21
    Likes Received:
    3

    Apr 19, 2018

    The 82-1's are for Pennsylvania principals when doing teacher evaluations on formal observations.
     
  4. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Phenom

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2014
    Messages:
    4,398
    Likes Received:
    1,304

    Apr 19, 2018

    Yay, you passed that admin test!

    Did you do an internship and shadow a principal? Have you tried applying for vice principal positions first? The reason I’m saying this is because I was reading online from other principals that they weren’t considered for positions until they worked a few years as a vice principal first.
     
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2018
  5. Been There

    Been There Habitué

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2017
    Messages:
    849
    Likes Received:
    518

    Apr 19, 2018

    In the spirit of offering constructive advice, I would first like to suggest that you take the time to proofread everything that leaves your computer. So many educators don't seem to realize the importance of projecting a positive impression to the general public not only in what they say, but in what they write. For example, you can start with the title of your post that includes a typo right off the bat! You might also want to brush up on the proper use of punctuation such as commas and possessive 's.

    As far as preparing to land your first administrative job, I would encourage you to consider taking on some challenging tasks that would demonstrate your leadership abilities, if you have not already done so. For example, I happened to be teaching at a huge school (60 teachers) that was in an uproar over the way the principal was handling things - the superintendent had to convene a heated meeting with the entire faculty to help quell the fire. So, for my admin. internship, I offered to facilitate a staff retreat to implement a school-wide process to resolve several long-standing issues. Since the 140-school district was in the process of developing its first Student Discipline Handbook, I also volunteered to chair a 20-member interdisciplinary committee (administrators, teachers, parents, lawyers, police, psychologists, community agencies) charged with writing the handbook. Another new program that I spearheaded involved sending over a hundred inner-city students to the Yosemite Institute for a week of environmental studies in the great outdoors; it included having to raise all the funds needed. Then, for good measure, I took on a high-profile summer school principalship at a large middle school in which competing gangs attempted to wreak havoc - this opportunity showcased my ability to work collaboratively with 50 teachers, 2 APs, 5 security guards, local police and district office personnel to ensure that students benefitted from a well-orchestrated summer school experience. I can testify that such experiences can definitely help you to outshine the competition - it worked for me in 5 out of 5 interviews!

    Finally, I would like to underscore the importance of going in with your eyes wide open as you proceed on your administrative journey. Unfortunately, there's no way I know of that will thicken your skin ahead of time. Once you cross the threshold into school administration, you'll quickly learn that things are not always what they seem - be prepared for the high probability that your "dream job" may well lose much of its luster along the way. Good luck!
     
    Last edited: Apr 20, 2018
    ms.irene and futuremathsprof like this.
  6. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Phenom

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2014
    Messages:
    4,398
    Likes Received:
    1,304

    Apr 19, 2018

    This is a wonderful post. Very insightful!
     
    Been There likes this.
  7. Been There

    Been There Habitué

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2017
    Messages:
    849
    Likes Received:
    518

    Apr 19, 2018

    I just noticed that you didn't mention having any advanced degrees. Expecting stiff competition, I admittedly got carried away (I enjoyed college) and earned three graduate degrees, including a doctorate in management. I highly recommend that you have at least one of these sheepskins under your belt. In addition, I had been an elementary and middle school classroom teacher (social studies, math, language arts, science) and held teaching positions in both special education (K-12) and bilingual education programs. Diversify your teaching experience as much as possible.

    You asked in your post if you need to know someone. Being an administrator or a wannabe is all about knowing the right people or at least those that may be in positions of influence. Don't leave any stone unturned. For example, I once attended a conference at Stanford and made it a point to personally meet the person who organized the entire event. I apparently left a favorable impression because when I was later offered a principalship in that prestigious area, I learned that my "contact" sat on the selection committee that hired me! The same thing happened when I applied for another principalship in another district - a local realtor that I happened to meet while researching the housing market turned out to be a close friend of the superintendent!

    One area that will also help you to beat the competition is a strong foundation in clinical supervision of instruction. This had been a special interest of mine so any interview questions related to this subject were a slam dunk for me! Not boasting, but I actually enjoyed critiquing a video of an actual lesson which was part of an interview - luckily, the video showed a novice teacher presenting a language arts lesson to a class of English-language-learners. As you may have read in another post in this forum, some educators tend to get hung up on minutiae when it comes to critiquing a lesson for evaluation purposes. It's important that you be able to astutely assess/recognize examples of good and bad teaching and explain what you would do to effectively assist marginal teachers to improve their practice.

    Lastly, don't be too quick to take advice from those who have not "been there". While most people advised me to limit my resume to one page or two at the most, mine consisted of three full pages! You can check out my advice re: interview questions on another thread under General Ed. Since Common Core forms the backbone of our system, you should know the standards like the back of your hand!

    Keep in mind that I went overboard in many ways in order to go after highly-sought-after positions; others many not be as demanding. I hope you find some of this inside information to be helpful.
     
    Last edited: Apr 20, 2018
    futuremathsprof likes this.
  8. FourSquare

    FourSquare Fanatic

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2009
    Messages:
    2,842
    Likes Received:
    321

    Apr 20, 2018

    Make sure you're ready to leave the classroom. We interviewed the most amazing AP candidate with wonderful accolades and great interview skills. Unfortunately, we could tell by the end he just wasn't ready to leave the kids. The job is NOT the same, and you will have a different role and relationship with children that frankly I don't care for. But I think it's also fine that we have great teachers just STAY teachers!
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. miss-m,
  2. barmati.ir,
  3. modernashop,
  4. stargirl,
  5. REW
Total: 194 (members: 5, guests: 159, robots: 30)
test