Full Class Novels?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by iteachbx, Aug 30, 2012.

  1. iteachbx

    iteachbx Enthusiast

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    Aug 30, 2012

    For those of you who teach upper elementary or middle/high school ELA, do you read full class novels in your class? Not where you're reading a novel aloud to the class, where everyone has a copy of the book and you're reading it together- with round robin reading- or reading for HW?

    I see so many projects on Donors Choose requesting 25 copies of the same book. I guess it's different in high school, but in upper elementary and middle school the kids reading levels tend to be very varied. I mean, do you really have 25 kids in your class that are all reading on grade level or that close to the grade level that they can all read the same book?

    Round robin reading was really looked down upon in my college and it definitely would be in my school. I could never do it because with my population of students, ESL, special ed, and below grade level I'll never have 25 kids that are all able to read the same book. Is it different elsewhere? Is there a benefit to it?

    I'm just curious because I see SO many of these projects and I wonder if everyone in the 7th grade can really understand Mockingjay...
     
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  3. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Aug 31, 2012

    I don't. I've never had a class where everyone could access the same novel.
     
  4. silverspoon65

    silverspoon65 Enthusiast

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    Yes, we do.

    I guess the other side of it in high school is that there is no way I could efficiently facilitate a reading lesson if the kids were reading 175 different books. But there are ways to make one book accessible to all kids. In a few cases (reading Shakespeare, for example), what we read is dictated by curriculum and standards.
     
  5. nstructor

    nstructor Cohort

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    Aug 31, 2012

    We read novels in a variety of ways-

    I give out parts like in a play, students read w/ partners, answer question chips, and do a variety of other activities after each chapter. We always do vocabulary too.
     
  6. DizneeTeachR

    DizneeTeachR Virtuoso

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    Aug 31, 2012

    I remember doing those kind of books in class when I was in jr and sr high!!!
     
  7. platypusok

    platypusok Companion

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    Aug 31, 2012

    We will this year. And I started last year with my freshmen and sophomores. The high school AP teacher is worried about the test because they need to draw from books with "literary value" and a lot of these kids don't read. For those not on reading level (especially IEP) I bought the book on "tape" for them to listen to as they read along.
     
  8. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    Aug 31, 2012

    Right now, students have their choice of four novels (1984, The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde, Tale of Two Cities or Watership Down) to read in second marking period. Because we know we have students of different reading abilities, we've given them the option of starting to read early so they aren't rushing like mad later.

    Next year, all English IV students at my school will read The Great Gatsby as their novel. It will tie in to a number of lessons in accordance with Common Core. I'm looking forward to seeing how this will work.
     
  9. McParadigm

    McParadigm Companion

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    Aug 31, 2012

    We were given 6 novels to choose from each quarter. In order to give the students choice and maintain adequate support and engagement, I would give them three choices and then create supplementary interactive Powerpoints for each. It required staking a long-term claim to the mobile lab, but it allowed students to work at their pace, get direct instruction and multimedia support for their novel, work in groups on tasks specific to their reading material, and get audio support (where needed).

    One hundred percent the most effective, powerful thing I ever did.
     
  10. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    Aug 31, 2012

    I do about 1 per quarter. Students never read aloud. (Well, if I was sick I have had a few of my very fluent readers read for me.)
    Anyway, we stop and discuss so often that my lower kids always get it.

    I've tried lit circles, but I can never get my kids to do the reading :rolleyes:
     
  11. Rockguykev

    Rockguykev Connoisseur

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    Sep 1, 2012

    I do with my middle schoolers. I don't see how reading a novel is any more difficult then reading highly complex textbooks. You just break it down the same. Frequent summarizing and explanation as needed.

    My 8th graders just finished Ayn Rand's Anthem on Friday. I guarantee they didn't get all of it and it was well above many of their reading levels but they enjoyed it and they'll get more and more as we break it down.
     

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