FTCE Math & Science at Pearson Test Ctr

Discussion in 'Single Subject Tests' started by RisyFLA, May 6, 2014.

  1. RisyFLA

    RisyFLA Rookie

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    May 6, 2014

    Has anyone taken a FTCE math or science subject exam in the past year or so?

    I want to know what kind of scientific calculator they give you and/or is there one on the computer?

    Anything else to be aware of?

    I figure, with only 90 seconds per question, there is no time for getting acquainted with the test environment. I can usually answer every practice question, but I usually derive the formulas (I have no head for memorization). Unfortunately, that takes 3-4 minutes per question and I am getting panicky!

    Thanks for ANY info
     
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  3. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    May 7, 2014

    Computer-based teacher tests nearly always include time in the test appointment (in addition to testing time itself) for a tutorial in using the testing software. This is true for both Praxis tests and Pearson tests, and the page at http://www.fl.nesinc.com/FL_DayOfTest.asp indicates that it is true of Florida's tests (which are administered by Pearson). Very often the tutorial, or at least a visual tour that covers the highlights of the tutorial, is also available for viewing on a test's Web site.

    The page at http://www.fldoe.org/asp/ftce/ftceguid.asp says that the free Test Information Guides specify whether, for a given test, a reference sheet (that is, a sheet of formulas) is offered. For all Pearson tests that information is also available by going to the home page for the state's testing program (in this case, www.fl.nesinc.com), clicking on the Tests link, and then clicking on the link for the test.
     
  4. RisyFLA

    RisyFLA Rookie

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    May 8, 2014

    Thanks, but . . .

    I am looking for some *specific information* especially as concerns the calculator(s). The NESINC hotline told me what the calculator might be "similar" to....kind of important to know what functions will be available and how to access them!

    I have read the published materials so many times I could probably recreate them from my poor memory. Practiced many times with Pearson's Test Software simulation, too.

    Does anyone with Florida experience have information about calculators, noise levels, desktop space, writing implements, etc?

    Thanks again!
     
  5. mickapoo

    mickapoo Rookie

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    Oct 7, 2015

    I know this post is old, but I found it through a google search so I figure others might as well and I wanted to post some helpful info.

    In regards to your question, on this page, it states that "a Texas Instruments TI-30X IIS scientific calculator is provided":

    http://www.fl.nesinc.com/testPage.asp?test=025

    You receive a calculator for both math 5-9 and 6-12. It does not mention a reference sheet on the test guide, so I am under the impress you do not get one.

    The noise level is basically nil. At my testing center at least, you are sectioned off room with all glass windows. They do not allow talking and if you have a question you have to raise your hand and the proctor comes in. There is a tiny bit of desktop space to the left and right of the keyboard. They provide you with a dry erase sheet and a dry erase pen. Hope this helps :)
     
  6. PoliticalFutbol

    PoliticalFutbol Rookie

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    Oct 24, 2015

    I am the same - do not like to trust the memory - like to build everything from the foundation - same way it is taught. But I think states that give such a test might be of the mind to certify teachers from other states who have taught the subject for years. When you teach the same thing year after to year, I think it gets memorized.
    I haven't taught Chemistry for many years. Back then I had a lot of balanced chemical equations memorized, knew the atomic weights for H to Ca, Fe, Pb, Au, etc. to 4 sig.figs. and up to 6 sig.figs and what they rounded to when needed, etc., etc. I have forgotten stuff and atomic weights have been updated. So now if I wanted to take a Chemistry Exam, and it was only 90 seconds per question, I think I would have to study a lot.
     
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2015
  7. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Oct 24, 2015

    You might well have to study, PoliticalFutbol - but experience suggests that, when people once knew the content well, it tends to start coming back to them.
     

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