FTCE ELEM K-6 how many points?

Discussion in 'Multiple Subject Tests' started by creativeman, Mar 25, 2015.

  1. creativeman

    creativeman Rookie

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    Mar 25, 2015

    I retook the science portion of the Elementary education FTCE test again and I needed a 200 and I got 193. I am doing the score validation. What I would like to know is how many points are each questions? How many questions I need to answer correctly on the score validation test?
     
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  3. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Mar 25, 2015

    Good luck with your score validation, though it's generally a waste of money (I think I've heard of two successful score validations, one of which involved documentable irregularities at the test site).

    193 is pretty close to passing. At this point, you're probably best served by learning to think in science terms. Try getting hold of a good kids' science book - my favorite, which may or may not still be in print, is Usborne's biggest Science Encyclopedia, but DK (=Dorling Kindersley) also has some fine science books - and reading it as though it were interesting. (It is, by the way: on the level that you need, science simply names stuff we actually kind of knew something about but didn't know we know. Newton's Laws of Motion are simply ways of organizing and labeling what you and your body know about why it's hard to get moving (inertia), what it takes to get going or stop (F = ma, a.k.a. The Bigger/Faster They Are, The Harder They Hit), and the fact that actions have consequences (including reflection and rebound). And chemistry is cooking, codified.)
     
  4. creativeman

    creativeman Rookie

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    I studied from top to bottom about science and each subject there is in science and I took about 6 months. Knowing about science isn't the issue. It is the fact that there is about 15 questions more or less that is actual science question. The reminder of the questions were, questions that asked you what would be a good activity for First grade students and etc. I am asking about, how many points is each question worth? I do not understand the scoring system and I would like to know so I can be more at ease and to how many questions I need to pass. Also why do you think that score validations are a waste of money?
     
  5. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Anyone outside Pearson who claims to be able to tell you EXACTLY how many scaled points a question is worth, or EXACTLY how many questions you can get wrong and still pass, is actually guessing. Scaling of scores exists because it's pretty well impossible to write even two questions that are exactly equivalent in difficulty, let alone a whole test of 'em, or two or three or ten tests' worth. Both Pearson and ETS deal with this by assigning something like a fudge factor to each question that bumps its value slightly up or slightly down. The goal is to ensure that each score of 200 on an elementary ed subtest, no matter which edition of that subtest is being used, will represent the same level of understanding and achievement.

    It's also the case that most multiple-choice teacher tests/subtests, and multiple-choice sections of teacher tests/subtests, contain what Pearson used to call "non-scoring" questions and what Praxis now calls "pre-test" questions. These are questions that don't count either for or against the test taker, because they're being field-tested for inclusion in future versions of the test.

    Any number you see that purports to represent the number of questions you can get wrong, if the source is responsible, will be a worst-case scenario: it will assume that the test taker gets the low-valued questions and the non-scoring questions right.

    As for the classroom-scenario questions: I don't recall offhand whether Florida's teacher tests are all now aligned to Common Core content standards or not. If they are, then look for Web sites with Common Core standards broken down by grade; if not, Florida should still have its own science standards, also broken down by grade. Either should give you some grasp on what it is that Florida expects students to be able to do and learn when.

    Experience suggests, in any case, that questions on subject-matter tests that seem to ask about classroom practice can often be reasoned out given a strong grasp of the content. Such a question poses four possible interventions/strategies, yes? Two will probably be stupid. Of the remaining two, the chances are that one would be a fine strategy, IF the content were a little different. (If the question is about chemical reactions, an answer that involves modeling with sand and salt is probably worse than an answer that involves vinegar and baking soda.)
     
  6. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Mar 25, 2015

    And why do I think score verification is a waste of money? Because, as noted, I've heard of at most two instances in which score verification resulted in a change, and I've been keeping an eye on teacher tests for most of two decades.

    Multiple-choice questions are machine-scored: your answer sheet is just going to be run through the Scantron-like machine one more time. And both Pearson and ETS have more than one person scoring constructed responses to begin with; if the two scorers' results for a constructed response differ by more than a point, in the INITIAL scoring, a third scorer is brought in. So both organizations used to explain, and probably still do, that constructed-response scoring is self-verifying.
     
  7. teach4USA

    teach4USA Rookie

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    Mar 26, 2015

    I think if you got the money to spare, it could surely help in retesting and what concepts/skills to study. Not so much for attempting to get extra points, for sure that is a waste of funds. B
     
  8. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Mar 26, 2015

    If score validation includes more information about the test, sure: then it might be worth it. If it's just rechecking the numbers without additional feedback (and that's often the case), it's really not worth it.
     

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