Frustrated!

Discussion in 'General Education' started by KRaeLamb, Aug 26, 2007.

  1. KRaeLamb

    KRaeLamb Rookie

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    Aug 26, 2007

    I know this is a silly question...but I have to ask it. Plus, this situation really frustrates me.

    If we are supposed to raise test scores in math and science, why does the BOE hire people who are not certified?


    (PS-this kind of applies to me too...I am not certified to teach SpEd, although I am currently working on the additional endorsements)
     
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  3. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Aug 26, 2007

    Are the not certified teachers alternate route? Under NCLB there shouldn't really be too many cases of non-certified teachers in classrooms. My district does not hire non-certified (or even alternate route this year as the NJ code for compliance has changed...)
     
  4. KRaeLamb

    KRaeLamb Rookie

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    Well, we have three long term subs and they are not certified or working on certification.
     
  5. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Aug 26, 2007

    Which is allowed in most districts for subs. Hopefully they are being supported by administration and by their grade elvel colleagues in lesson planning, test prep, materials and management.
     
  6. socaldisneygal

    socaldisneygal Rookie

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    Same stuff in California, we can't find 2 teachers so the kids have subs and we also need to improve test scores.
     
  7. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Wait, you have subs because you can't find teachers or because the teachers will be coming back off leave some time during the school year? Seems strange with all the certified, highly qualified teachers unable to find jobs that there would be openings filled with subs?
     
  8. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    We have a number of long term subs in place for the entire school year because we couldn't find any licensed teachers.

    :2cents:
     
  9. chicagoturtle

    chicagoturtle Fanatic

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    Subs are cheaper. (The board doesn't have to pay benefits and pays 1/2 the salary). We often have classes filled by subs here...
     
  10. Miss_snugs

    Miss_snugs Rookie

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    In districts in my area you have to be certified to teach and to sub.
     
  11. silverspoon65

    silverspoon65 Enthusiast

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    Its really difficult to find math and science teachers. Sometimes you have to hire someone without certification, or no one at all.
     
  12. socaldisneygal

    socaldisneygal Rookie

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    There were no applicants applying for the job. Single Subject English in Fontana California. However they did hire someone this week, it is a friend of another intern at our school.

    I think that one reason we have a hard time finding teachers is that most of our teachers are single subject, (7th and 8th) and our 6th grade is multiple. Most single subject credentialed teachers want high school. Also, there are misconceptions about our district, like that it is unpleasent. I love working at my school, and my district is ok. I have talked to people that are qualified, but they don't want to teach in "that area" or with "those kids" but they will sub and make less money and not get the same expierence. Also, there is one district in our area that pays really well, so some people hold out to get hired there.
     
  13. socaldisneygal

    socaldisneygal Rookie

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    Also, I don't know what the credentialing process is for other states, but in California it is annoyingly stupid at times. My hubby is working on becoming a teacher and is starting to jump through the hoops so that next school year he can teach.
     
  14. mikeshake

    mikeshake New Member

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    In Florida, schools get around the NCLB by hiring long term subs or teachers with a general middle school certification for middle schools. Also, science teachers do not have to have a science degree. Only a few science classes in college or a previous certification. If they have a previous cert. they can then test for a science cert. If they pass the test they are magically transformed into competent science teachers. Then they can look forward to years of teaching without chemicals, open flame, dissection, scales, Van de Graaf generators, or really any science apparatus. If they are in a portable classroom, which many are, they don't even have a sink! Of course, many of these science teachers are not aware that these things are necessary for a relevant science class or even know what they are.
     
  15. mikeshake

    mikeshake New Member

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    Oh, and I forgot. No animals are allowed in the classroom! Isn't science fun boys and girls? After earning a life science degree and teaching middle school for almost 10 years, I'm about ready to call it quits. Every year they take something useful away, like chemicals because they are so dangerous (yeah, if you aren't trained to use them), and add new standards and requirements.

    Funny thought about the chemicals. Since most of the teachers don't have science degrees they really aren't trained to use them. Ahhh, the policies become clearer!
     
  16. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    They are just trying to make it more difficult for children to get the experiences needed to be successful in life. And then they begin to wonder why there is such a high turnover rate of teachers and why many are taking a different career path.
     
  17. Andibee

    Andibee Rookie

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    Aug 28, 2007

    A local district

    still needs 96 teachers, mostly math, science, and sped. School started Monday. They "hope to have the positions filled in the next three months!" Subs (only have to have a HS diploma, I think) are in the classroom.
     

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