Frustrated

Discussion in 'Behavior Management Archives' started by katerina03, Nov 13, 2006.

  1. katerina03

    katerina03 Devotee

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2004
    Messages:
    1,120
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 13, 2006

    I am a first year teacher and because "The First Days of School" is my bible, I have been consistent with my discipline plan from day 1. As far as first years go, I think it has been a good one because my behavior problems are not too much to handle.
    My problem is with my last pd of the day. Half the class is loud-mouth trouble makers. I know other teachers have problems with these kids too, but it seems that I am the only one who consistently gives them detentions or referrals. I've had several kids tell me that I am the only one who always gives them a detention. I tell them it's because they keep breaking the rules. I did call some parents today so hopeful that will help. I am trouble by the fact that if my detentions were really effective wouldn't the bad behviors stop? I have seen many of the worst behaved become great students. There are still a few that give me a headache almost everyday!
    I feel angry that I am the only teacher who is being consistent with the consequences because then I am seen as TOO STRICT!
     
  2.  
  3. Tigers

    Tigers Habitué

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2006
    Messages:
    848
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 13, 2006

    you are trying to hold the children accountable, and that is admirable. But, did you really think that the detentions would work? Unless, in detention at your school the children do something of value...It is a million times more work than you already have undertaken, but some of your more challenging students could, most likely, be reached through curriculum. Though, now that you have drawn the line stick to your line, unless you find an improved route. And before you change, remember to ask yourself what are the implications of changing. If you give them after-school detentions or Saturday detentions, then you could always consider going into detention with them and working on the classwork with them. This might change the too strict into she cares, she knows we are better, and she is going to hold us to it. Or they will think you have no life, and are obsessed with whatever subject you teach, but even if they think that you are still sending a positive message about dedication :)
     
  4. grade1teacher

    grade1teacher Companion

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2006
    Messages:
    249
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 13, 2006

    I wonder about that too - my students are younger, so of course the behaviors are different and the consequences are differernt. but I it bothers me when I need to consistently give out consequences to the same kids. I just started a new management system with my kids - more streamelined and eassier to keep track of what is going on. It has helped a LOT, and I know it is better than the one that I had before, but I also know that kids will really test it in the beginnnig, and it just means that I need to be REALLYconsistent, especially now, at this stage. But I hate that /i need to keep doing this - and it makes me wonder if I am being too strict. the fact is, though, that if I let these behaviors go, then I'm asking for the kind of classroom that I had in the beginning of the year, and I'm not willing to go back to that! So as long as I still think that the punishm,ent fits the crime, I'm gonna keep at it. I hope I'm doing the right thing!
     
  5. ctopher

    ctopher Comrade

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2005
    Messages:
    386
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 13, 2006

    Detentions don't address the cause of the behavior problem and so they don't work. My school got rid of detentions because the students didn't care if they got one or not and were no big deal. Behavior and school climate have actually improved with getting rid of detention and going to natural consequences.
     
  6. synapse

    synapse Comrade

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2006
    Messages:
    319
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 14, 2006

    What takes place in your classroom during the last period of the day? Is it interesting, engaging and developmentally appropriate? Are you going into the last period expecting problems and frustrated? I would suggest focusing on the things you can control...that is your own behavior (which includes instruction, communication, expectations...etc.). Also, consider calling parents with more good news than bad. This will help develop a relationship that can help. Finally, take some time to reflect on your developing perceptions of your students...you call them "loud mouth trouble makers." Realize that students will create all types of emotion within you...but also realize that you have control over that emotion. You have to accept and own in without feeding into or escalating the behavior. This is difficult, but absolutely necessary.
     
  7. collteach

    collteach Comrade

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2005
    Messages:
    295
    Likes Received:
    0

    Dec 10, 2006

    It is so interesting to read about detentions being stopped at schools. Our school just implemented detention as basically the only form of discipline for our students. We used to have loss of recess, but our new "wellness" plan took that away. Then we decided to have students who broke rules walk alone during recess...that way they would get the exercise, but not the socialization that most 4th graders want. They took that away as well. We have only had a few students go to detention, and so far, those children's teachers say it has worked.

    I think that the root of the problem is that too many children are not held accountable for their actions. I contact parents about misbehavior, and nothing ever changes with the students. I have asked students if their parents discussed things with them, and usually the answer is "Yeah, they said don't do it again." Of course, they do it again, I call again, etc. etc. etc.
     
  8. MistyMooola

    MistyMooola Rookie

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2006
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0

    Dec 11, 2006

    That all sounds great - but I'm with the teachers who have continuous problems with the same students. I need some real answers.
     
  9. Tigers

    Tigers Habitué

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2006
    Messages:
    848
    Likes Received:
    0

    Dec 11, 2006

    I agree that many children are not held accountable for their actions, but I think a larger problem is that when children are held accountable for the actions the consequences are so far removed from the actions that the children don't necessarily equate the two.
     
  10. Teaching Grace

    Teaching Grace Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2005
    Messages:
    1,731
    Likes Received:
    3

    Dec 12, 2006

    i agree that the children are to be held accountable for their actions. are you able to have the students come to you for detention? that way you can make them do work specific to their punishment. or extra academic work? just make sure to stick to continuing to give out the detentions and referrals b/c i'm pretty sure you aren't the only teacher giving them.
     
  11. katerina03

    katerina03 Devotee

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2004
    Messages:
    1,120
    Likes Received:
    0

    Dec 12, 2006

    I am sure that I am the only one giving them consistently. I know this because we are a team and we each have a day that we hold the detentions in our own rooms. I have noticed that my students are behaving much much better now and I am giving out detentions and referrals less often.
     
  12. Major

    Major Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2005
    Messages:
    1,620
    Likes Received:
    5

    Dec 12, 2006

    Hang in there katerina03...... Stick to your guns. I had a very successful career in the corporate world. I believe much of my success was due to teachers who "held my feet to the fire." They have long since passed away, but I still love and respect each and every one of them.

    Major Hunt :)
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

Total: 272 (members: 1, guests: 249, robots: 22)
test