frustrated child who cries

Discussion in 'Behavior Management Archives' started by jaimed, Sep 24, 2005.

  1. jaimed

    jaimed Rookie

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    Sep 24, 2005

    I have a students who get frustrated very easily and cries. It is an issue that is has had since he was little his mom told me. The other students get annoyed b/c it is disrupting. I go over to him right away and calm him down. I have been working with him a lot on the issue.. Any ideas?
     
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  3. Rosieo

    Rosieo Enthusiast

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    Sep 24, 2005

    I had a child like that a few years ago. The other kids in the room were so annoyed at him. So what I did is I gave him a chair on the side of the classroom. It was kind of blocked by a bookcase so the other kids really couldn't see him. Whenever he became frustrated and cried he went over to the "thinking" chair as it became called. He would stay there until he felt he had his emotions under control. I came up with this idea with the help of our school counselor. As time went on and he had his outbursts all i had to do was give him the look and he knew it was OK to go to the thinking chair. This really worked out great. He was away from the other children so they did not have to see him crying and it gave him time to think about his actions. I liked the plan, his parents liked the plan and this child seemed to benefit from it. Even though the other kids knew why he was there I don't feel this child felt singled out. I think he felt it was his safe place where the other kids wouldn't be staring at him.
     
  4. rwmurphy

    rwmurphy Rookie

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    Sep 24, 2005

    I like Roseio's remedy. I am only a student, but in one of my field placements last Spring, I was placed at a school which used "Responsive Classroom" positive discipline approach. It REALLY worked. This solution sounds exactly the same as the positive discipline. A child learns to self-regulate by excusing himself from the group. The key to it all was that when he decided to return, he was not questioned, reprimanded, etc. It REALLY worked! If I hadn't seen it for six weeks, I would not have believed it. You can check out Responsive Classroom's website at http://responsiveclassroom.org You can sign up for a free quarterly publication. Has some really great ideas.
     
  5. Rosieo

    Rosieo Enthusiast

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    Sep 24, 2005

    Thanks for the link to Responsive Classroom. I signed up for their issues.
     
  6. rwmurphy

    rwmurphy Rookie

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    Sep 25, 2005

    I'm glad you checked out the website. I am certain you will enjoy the publication.

    The school where I observed this method of discipline was East Tennessee State University Lab School. Supposed to be up-to-date with Best Practices. I truly enjoyed my time there and I was impressed to see all of the stuff I've been learning actually applied in a classroom.

    I was very happy to hear a real teacher (you) give such good advice using such a positive approach (non-punitive). I am 40 years old, mother of three, a non-traditional student, and I like to hear of teachers treating children with respect. Thank you.
     
  7. Rosieo

    Rosieo Enthusiast

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    Sep 25, 2005

    rwmurphy - why do you consider yourself a non-traditinal student? Just curious.
     
  8. rwmurphy

    rwmurphy Rookie

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    Sep 25, 2005

    My school recognizes me as non-traditional because of my age (I am 40 years old) I am undergraduate student. I commute 70 miles to attend the University (that's 140 round trip).

    Sometimes, I just don't feel qualified to offer advice because of my lack of teaching experience. I think my world knowledge makes up for a lot of things, though.
     
  9. kinderkids

    kinderkids Virtuoso

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    Sep 25, 2005

    world knowledge or "life knowledge" is sometimes the best and most common sense there is! :)
     
  10. Rosieo

    Rosieo Enthusiast

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    Sep 25, 2005

    rwmurphy-I was like you in a way. I went back to college to become a teacher when my kids were older. (Although I didn't do the 140 mile drive!) I graduated with my teaching degree when I was 40 and landed a job right away. I do feel that my life experience with my own kids really does help me in my classroom. Good luck.
     
  11. AuntieM

    AuntieM Rookie

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    Sep 27, 2005

    I am also a "non-traditional" @ 43, I am student teaching in the 4th grade this semester. I BELIEVE my mom-sense and life skills are making me a better teacher. I choose my battles more carefully, I laugh with my students because I don't care if they think I am"mean"! I don't let them manipulate me, because I have been on that street before with my own kids and recognize the street signs! I love my students and I will miss them so much at the end of this semester. I encourage you not to let your age even be a second thought. You will be an amazing teacher!
     
  12. jcg

    jcg Cohort

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    Sep 27, 2005

    I had a child that cried a lot. whenever she made a mistake and I corrected her. When she did I would just go over and tell her in her ear, everybody makes mistakes, please go to the bathroom and dry your tears.It seemed to work for her.
     

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