Frustrated because kids are not listening

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Batman15, Nov 30, 2012.

  1. Batman15

    Batman15 Rookie

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    Nov 30, 2012

    Today was very frustrating kids were just straight up not listening after being told 5 to 10 times. I had to keep telling the same girl "stay in your seat" stay in your seat." The girl keeps getting up like I am not even there. The same thing happens with a boy in the classroom. Then kids just get up start walking around and chaos ensues. I tried to clap for attention....did not work.....put up a silent hand....only to feel silly because kids just straight up ignored except a few.....then I starting yelling and that just made things worse because the kids started yelling....It was ridiculous.....I just don't understand they literally started parading the room....I know you guys are gonna tell me I need rules and procedures....rules and procedures...how about just getting some respect in this world????
     
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  3. MissScrimmage

    MissScrimmage Aficionado

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    Nov 30, 2012

    What are the consequences for these behaviors? Being told 5-10 times is not a consequence, it's nagging.

    And yup, sounds like it's time to re-explain expectations and have students practice procedures until they can do them correctly. It doesn't sound like much teaching is happening anyway, so spend some time really laying out those expectations.

    Also, don't forget the power of praise - praise and reward the ones who are doing what you've told them to.
     
  4. Tyler B.

    Tyler B. Groupie

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    Nov 30, 2012

    I've had that same thing happen. Here's what I learned: if one or two kids are acting up, those kids have a problem. If a bunch of kids are acting up, it's due to my mistakes. I've also noticed that generally teachers who complain about their class are doing something wrong.

    MissScrimmage has nailed it. You need help with your management techniques.

    Don't dispair, my first principal told me he was going to have to fire me because I didn't manage my students well. Two years later he hired me to teach management seminars to classified employees. I had learned how to love my job, my students and my management techniques.
     
  5. Loomistrout

    Loomistrout Devotee

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    Nov 30, 2012

    Why do you think these things are happening? Remember you have a room full of other people's kids. You don't have the luxury of years of bonding. You will want their cooperation even though they have no vested interest in cooperating. And you will want their cooperation immediately, without fussing and without nagging. Ask a parent how difficult this is with one child, two or three? You have 30.

    Lots of teachers have rules and procedures. In some classrooms they actually mean something and others, well ... . As soon as a teacher makes a rule or teaches a procedure what do students (not all) do? They test it, of course. It's part of establishing boundaries or "You said it was so, but is it really?"

    Consider: Next time students come into room watch to see who is on task quickly (bell work). Write these students' names on the board (3-5) (cheat of you have to). Some may think they are in trouble - usual reason for names up - and ask about name. Tell them not to worry. You will explain later. During the period write a couple names of those staying in seat. About five minutes before recess stop class and tell those with names on board they may stop working, take out materials for next subject and go to recess. Tell the rest of the class to keep working. At recess explain to rest of class the reason names got to go early is because they were on task and stayed in their seat. Tell them after recess you will, again, watch to see who is on task and stays in seat and those names will go on board for early next recess.
     
  6. Poodle15

    Poodle15 Companion

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    Nov 30, 2012

    I just wanted to pipe up to say that I am totally saving this in my ever growing classroom management file! Love this!
     
  7. MissScrimmage

    MissScrimmage Aficionado

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    Nov 30, 2012

    I was getting frusterated this week because I felt like our end of day packing up/dimissal was not going well. I was nagging, and it just seemed like chaos. I had to take a step back and figure out what wasn't working. Then today as a class, we brainstormed what the students' jobs were at the end of the day and what MY job was. We wrote these on an I-chart. During dismissal I would periodically stop the students and we would do a quick run through of the chart - "Are you getting dressed? Are you quiet? Are you in your own space?" etc. This afternoon went significantly better!!!
     
  8. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

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    Nov 30, 2012

    Anyone else curious about what age/grade he's dealing with?
     
  9. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    Nov 30, 2012

    I'm thinking middle school.
    The best thing to do is to stop the first offender. As soon as a student gets out of his seat, you must address it. As soon as someone says something out of turn, you must address it. There can be different ways / styles, but you must address. Sometimes I tell the person he must raise his hand to speak. Sometime I just look and mark him down. Other times I say something like 'if you raised your hand and said that, you would have made my day'. Sometimes I say 'raise your hand' he does it, call on him and let him repeat what he already said. This all depends on the class and what you think would work best.
    But if you don't address it with the first person, then before you know it, you'll have 5-6 kids talking at the same time, or out of their seat, etc.
     
  10. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    Dec 1, 2012

    This exactly.

    When one or two is acting up, you are able to administer consequences to those students, they learn their lesson, the lesson goes on.

    When the entire class is up and about, it's tough to administer consequences, you get stressed, and you need to do some reflection.

    If you feel students aren't respecting you, you need to do a number of things.

    Like you said, if you don't have rules, you need to come up with rules. I like the number 5, so I never have more than five rules. These are posted in the room.

    Secondly, drill deeper and think about the activity you were doing. What were your expectations behaviorally for the students? Did you expect them to be in their seats and working quietly? If so, did you adequately communicate those expectations to them MULTIPLE times (they need it)?

    Rules mean nothing though if kids don't respect you and kids won't respect you if you don't mean business. If you're nagging (i.e. telling a girl to sit down five times in a row without doing anything when she doesn't do what you say) you don't mean business.

    You mean business with your body language. Move deliberately, not in a rushed manner. Stand with presence. Breathe calmly. And ALWAYS follow up with a consequence if students are not meeting your expectations if you've communicated them clearly. Do this without looking irritated or angry. It needs to be done matter-of-factly and automatically like an everyday thing like brushing your teeth or picking your nose. This is called being consistent. And by always I mean always. I have trouble with this too, so don't worry if you don't get it perfect, but strive to be consistent.
     
  11. Batman15

    Batman15 Rookie

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    Dec 1, 2012

    I got 4th and 6th grade....the problem has been at dismissal for 6th when the kids have to get up to get their stuff but they totally take advantage of this opportunity....thanks for all the great advice...I like the names on the board idea for positive praise and calm but strong presence..no more nagging...strict consequences
     
  12. Tyler B.

    Tyler B. Groupie

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    Dec 1, 2012

    If you are going to try and change their behavior at dismissal, you need to rename the activity. For example, tell the class "We are going to do dismissal southern style. That means we get our things quietly and respectfully. Raise your hand if you think you could show the class how to do this? [Have one student show how it's done and ask the class questions so they watch that kid as he goes about nicely getting his things and lining up quietly.]
     
  13. SCTeachInTX

    SCTeachInTX Fanatic

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    Dec 2, 2012

    . Who is on duty when you send the kids out? That could be a problem....
     

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