FORCED to resign. Now what?

Discussion in 'New Teachers' started by g.r.i.t.s.teach, Mar 4, 2010.

  1. tonysam

    tonysam Comrade

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    Dec 16, 2011

    The former superintendent supported my dismissal and wasted thousands of dollars in taxpayer money in order to cover up for the last principal and the former head of human resources. Too many people have since left for me to get any kind of decent evaluation. I can't even get a part-time aide job in another state because the economy is so bad.

    Teaching is such a dangerous field to go into because one person can basically destroy your career. I am glad some people were able to get hired again, but I have had no such luck.
     
  2. tonysam

    tonysam Comrade

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    Dec 16, 2011

    In some states they can ding your license if you resign without sufficient notice. It's a big no-no to resign before the end of your contract term without giving the district advance notice (like sixty days).
     
  3. webmistress

    webmistress Devotee

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    Dec 17, 2011

    Tony that is true, and 60 days is a long time when you become suddenly ill (physically or mentally). That was my issue (mental and physical illness) and I'm sure the case of many who have been blackballed or banned from ever teaching again. It's a form of discrimination because you can't help when you will get sick. If you present the medical documents and proof, why would they continue to harass you, well, that's what they did to me. It was dead wrong.

    I'm thankfully in the private sector at this moment where I only need to give 2 weeks notice.

    But I'm sorry about your experiences. I will never step foot as a classroom teacher again but I do plan to try Home bound teaching. Some HR person accepted my resignation and told me the other district people who were out to ruin my career could not do it even though I resigned immediately. I had a good case and thank God things worked out for me. I still have my license and need to use it.

    There should be some HR person, board, school or someone out there willing to give you a chance. Good luck! Also try to meet with the state superintendent or talk to a lawyer. I was ready to meet with my state's super and had talked to an educational lawyer. It's all so political so it's a hard battle for one person.
     
  4. Special-t

    Special-t Enthusiast

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    Dec 17, 2011

    Did you have a special education coordinator at your school? Perhaps one that sat in on your IEPs? That person could also be considered your immediate supervisor. Or did you have a department head you worked under? In my mind, these supervisors are more "immediate" than your principal since they've actually worked with you.
     
  5. savyteacher

    savyteacher New Member

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    Aug 2, 2015


    Not true. I have had to take a few various teaching positions in schools where I didn't know the staff, principal, or dynamics of the school or position, and they were not a good fit for me at all. I resigned in lieu of non re-election and didn't put a couple of those "take a chance" nightmare positions on my resume because they were not a good representation of my skills, experience, or abilities.

    I put the district/school where I was successful for many years, not the new one that I didn't fit in with for whatever reason. I have a strong personality and don't fit in everywhere, and that is ok because it should be about teaching ability. But termination decisions aren't usually about the students. :confused:

    What is insane is that districts will just let you go if you don't click with one principal no questions asked! You should be able to apply for other positions in that same district and the hiring principals should be able to ask questions and make decisions, not just lazy HR staff.:mad:

    In addition, I received unemployment here in California every time, by explaining why I resigned. If the unemployment office calls the district they will have to state that the principal told you (or you might have a letter) stating that you were told that you would be non re-elected, so were forced to resign. The unemployment offices are up on this now.

    I don't feel badly anymore that I only fit in certain types of schools, with certain types of staffs, and know that I am a good teacher. School districts don't give you time to learn how to teach anymore, so don't feel badly either. The fact that districts throw away new teachers on the word of one principal is ridiculous. I think that it is their way of "pay back" that they can't get rid of tenured teachers without actually doing their due diligence, so they take it out on new teachers who haven't had the time to become excellent, which can take several years.

    When I entered teaching, you were appreciated. In California, you are a dime a dozen, so don't go in unless you can "fly under the radar," and not conflict with anyone. Especially important in elementary schools that have staffs of too many passive-aggressive women. Try to get a job in a school that has a balance of men, if you have a strong personality. Good luck!
     
  6. savyteacher

    savyteacher New Member

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    Aug 3, 2015

    This is an old post, but in case anyone else has this issue, I have replied. No, you don't have to put that district down. No, you don't have to check that you resigned in lieu because from what I understand the district can only state that you resigned. However the hiring district can request your file, so they can get the information from that, so I wouldn't bother referencing them.

    I have plenty of jobs in my past, from restaurant server to daycare, that I leave out on my teaching applications and resumes. Just because one teaching job didn't work out, does not mean that another won't, so think about your career, and leave it off. I have had several short-term teaching jobs that I HAD to take that didn't work out that aren't a reflection of my abilities. The long-term position that does reflect my abilities is the one that I use for a reference.

    Two other points:

    -You can collect unemployment insurance at least in California if you resign in lieu of non re-election. You explain that you had to or your would be terminated. If the unemployment office calls the district or principal, they will have to verify that.

    -A district won't find out if you worked in another district from your retirement plan as that is not the purpose of the plan. If you are worried, put that you weren't previously in the retirement plan and the retirement plan will add your benefits from your social security number anyway.

    Good luck out there-teaching is a tough career right now!
     
  7. savyteacher

    savyteacher New Member

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    Aug 3, 2015


    Legally, principals can say anything as long as it is true. They can also ask if that principal would hire you again. The hiring district can also ask for your file and find out what they want to know. Leave the district off.

    The districts are not doing their due diligence by throwing away new hires to their districts on one principal's word, without allowing time to be proficient (at least two years), which is essential in teaching. Think about your career that you have prepared so hard for first. The districts need to do a better job at encouraging and training their new hires and taking the time and effort to really evaluate whether someone needs to be given another chance at another school, rather than expelling them from the whole district. Personality conflicts are common in teaching between teachers and administrators and the district needs to understand this and not throw away new hires without real evaluation.

    Unions need to do more to protect new teachers without tenure as well.
     
  8. MissPapa

    MissPapa Comrade

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    Aug 16, 2015

    I was in a similar situation, but I was a substitute teacher. I had a job interview at a school and the principal ended up not being interested in me. Then, I was called in for a long-term assignment. When she realized who I was, she was a bit iffy about me working at her school for some odd reason. After the long-term assignment was over, I never heard from that school again (even though I expressed interest in subbing in that school in the future). I didn't put her in my references; I put the AP down being that she worked with me more.

    And I would've said "resigned by choice." It makes yourself look more professional and trustworthy.
     

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