for those of you who have to submit lesson plans to your principals...

Discussion in 'General Education' started by lou reed, Nov 11, 2008.

  1. lou reed

    lou reed Companion

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    Nov 11, 2008

    ... do you think it has a positive/negative/neutral effect on your teaching?

    I'm just curious, I've worked for two principals and neither has required lesson plans. I don't write my plans down, but I have a really casual weekly schedule (ie: "math-carrying," etc.) and my curriculum map for the year. It strikes me as being a lot of extra work on both ends, but I'm just assuming. So, for those of you who do it, what do you think of it?
     
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  3. fuzed_fizzion

    fuzed_fizzion Comrade

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    Nov 11, 2008

    I have had to have them on my desk before I left every Friday. It was a pain at first, but eventually I realized it made the week go by more smoothly. We also began to plan together to make to share the load of writing out plans. I have had principals who don't require them. I actually think it is pretty important for the first few years of teaching to plan with another teacher and write lesson down.
     
  4. kcjo13

    kcjo13 Phenom

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    I personally think it is a waste of time. I never follow them past Monday anyway. Something always comes up, and I end up changing everything anyway. But I have to do it, so I do, just to keep everyone happy. I am pretty vague because of it-I set an objective for the week, and a rough plan for each day. I have it set up in a document with a table so I can print it out and see the week at a glance.
     
  5. Jem

    Jem Aficionado

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    I hate it. I have a pacing guide for the year, and I follow that. The lesson plans I turn in are pretty complete, but they have caused some friction. The principal wanted to see page numbers from the text book written down, and it came to light that I wasn't using the textbook (copyright 1990). Now I'm always worried she's going to come after me for something else in there. It's such a stressor. I like to be trusted as a professional, and will gladly show her what we're doing in the classroom, but I do not appreciate micro-managing.
     
  6. Mrs. R.

    Mrs. R. Connoisseur

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    Nov 11, 2008

    I am not required to turn my plans in, but I am expected to have them. I find that making my weekly plans makes me a more organized teacher. I post my plans on my website so the kids and the parents know what's probably going to happen in class in a given week.
    I always explain what the word "tentative" means to my classes at the beginning of the year. I often deviate from my plans, but I do not feel that making them is a waste of time.
     
  7. Shanoo

    Shanoo Habitué

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    Nov 11, 2008

    Now, by lesson plans are we talking full, written out lesson plans with step by step instructions or an overall guide as to what you're going to do?

    When I write lesson plans (which I'm not required to do, but a lot of the time do after the fact....so that next year I can see what I did), I go full out...they're usually 2-3 pages long. Therefore it isn't something I do every day.

    What I do do every day is, in my planner, I write out point form what I plan to do that day. For example, for tomorrow's science class I have:

    - finish vocabulary
    - steps of meiosis

    So which are we talking....cause a full out lesson plan for every class, every day seems like a rediculous amount of work.
     
  8. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Nov 12, 2008

    I have never had to do it. Yet I still have an opinion-- what else is new???

    I don't think it will effect a "good" teacher a whole lot. A good teacher will have a concrete idea of what needs to be taught, of how it will be approached, of vocabulary the kids need to know, of appropriate examples, and of everything else that needs to be done. Will everything be written down if it doesn't have to be? No, but it's all put together.

    But I don't think the policy is aimed at those teachers.

    I think its purpose is to prevent other teachers from trying to wing it. From thinking "It's only adding fractions, or meiosis/meitosis or whatever... how hard can it be??" It's for teachers who might otherwise fall far behind in the material. It's for teachers who don't HAVE a plan whether or not they're writing it down.

    Like you, I've been teaching a long time. Today's plan book says "Start factoring: GCF" And that's all I need. But the young teacher I'm working with, who is teaching Seniors (don't ask) will walk in today having done every single example she plans to do with her classes.
     
  9. daizie75

    daizie75 Rookie

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    I have to have mine but they are rarely checked. I don't mind it at all - I need to have plans. Mine take up 2 pages for the week. They are not in depth 6-pt. plans. I did work for a principal who made us turn them in the Wed. before we started teaching them. That was very stressful. They weren't even correct the day we started them unless Thursday and Friday went perfectly. They were supposed to be checked and returned to us by Friday so we could make changes. We always lived in fear that our plans would be rejected. Much of the time it was about semantics not what we were teaching.
    I think writing lesson plans is good preparation for most teachers but obviously a new teacher should have different requirements than someone who has been teaching 20 years. But even more importantly performance should have a lot to do with it. If you and your students are doing well with the type of plans you do, the administration should have other things to worry about - unless they are micro-managers.
     
  10. lemonhead

    lemonhead Aficionado

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    Nov 12, 2008

    I have to have mine typed in a 5E model in the computer program for anyone in the district to see. They must be entered by Monday morning for the week.

    I do think this helps. I think it would especially help teachers who's accountability is questioned.
     
  11. kcjo13

    kcjo13 Phenom

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    I agree that the main purpose is to help/force teachers who don't tow the line to do so. But my main beef is why punish those of us who do? It's not that big of a deal to me now, I will always have something written out (tomorrow: Dividing fractions, transition sentences, structure of DNA, Chinese pictographs, veterans program) My school is big on issuing blanket policies instead of addressing the one or two who aren't doing what they are supposed to...sigh...
     
  12. mmswm

    mmswm Moderator

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    We have to turn them in, but my P is pretty laid back about them. She makes us do it because the county says we have to, but she says they're more of a guide than a set of instructions. If she ever had a problem with any of us, she'd probably get more strict about it with the particular teacher, but she wouldn't go after the whole group. She also made her own form, which is incredibly abreviated. It's one page with room on a second page for step by step planning if we need it, but we only HAVE to turn in the first page.
     
  13. Doug_HSTeach_07

    Doug_HSTeach_07 Comrade

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    Nov 13, 2008

    We have to turn ours in every Friday. I used to dread it at first- filling out these plans (which I will have to start doing today!) seemed to be that last mammoth obstacle standing in my way of the weekend and always seemed to take forever.

    However, I've found that it's very useful. I'm a second year teacher, and it helps to have a printed, hard copy of my outline for the entire year. As I look into next week, it gives a basic framework for what I want to do and it's easy for me to mentally visualize the week. Over the weekend, I usually come up with supplements to my already-made plans.

    For me, they're a help even though I hate doing them sometimes.
     
  14. Miss W

    Miss W Phenom

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    Nov 13, 2008

    We have to have them in the office each week because it is required by state. Our P requires them in by 8:00 Monday morning. Honestly, I don't mind doing lesson plans. Ours are not step by step lesson plans. They're guidelines for us. If we get off a little from the plans it's not a big deal. Our P does check them some time during the week to make sure we've turned them in. I'm not too sure how much she really goes over them. Our grade level created our pacing guide according to the TIA. We are pretty much at the same point most of the year, with the every day exceptions.
    The hardest part of my lesson plans each year is creating the blank template in Excel. After I've done that, it's really easy just to plug in the information to the right spot.
     
  15. Jem

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    Nov 13, 2008

    I've been thinking a lot about this post, and I want to clarify my posting. I hate DOING them, but I do agree they are helpful. I suppose it's the attitude my principal has about them. They MUST be in her box by Monday morning, and then she just glances through them for text book pages. I gave her a complete pacing guide in July that she never looked at, and then she got upset when I started following it on my first set of lesson plans because she didn't like my order in math. So it's the micro-managing and nit-picking that I hate. She also gets upset if I don't do things in the time order I have on the plans, as she'll randomly stop in to check my reading. After I turn the plans in, I just write everything down in a list on a giant weekly calendar I have on my front table. I just cross everything off as we get to it, regardless of the order. I like flexibility, and if my kids need to do art before math, we'll do it. I don't like to be held to something I wrote the weekend before. So that's what I have a beef with. Not the lesson plans themselves.
     

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