Food Inc. Movie

Discussion in 'Teacher Time Out' started by Jem, Feb 21, 2010.

  1. Jem

    Jem Aficionado

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    Feb 21, 2010

    I just finished watching this with dh-good grief!!

    Anyone else have this reaction? Like, honestly? Our factory processed meat is being soaked in ammonia and given chlorine baths to kill E Coli?!? When the organic meat is being processed in open air 'shacks' and has less than 5% of the E Coli that is STILL present in the factory meat, even after all those chemicals???

    Oh, gross. Dh and I just made a pact to shop at the farmer's market every week, and I will never, ever eat another hamburger from a fast food restaurant again. I vow here and now. Although I also vowed two years ago never to drink diet pop again because it turns into formaldehyde in your stomach, and yet I seem to keep ordering that Diet Coke when we go out....

    NO! No more! Gross, gross, gross.
     
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  3. MsMar

    MsMar Fanatic

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    Yup, scary stuff in there. Gross, gross, gross indeed. Loved that guy with the small chicken farm.
     
  4. KinderCowgirl

    KinderCowgirl Phenom

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    I haven't seen the movie, but I have seen footage from the factories-I haven't eaten meat since then. The antibiotics they have to give the chickens because there are so many in one cage and end up fighting with each other all the time. I buy eggs from cage-free farms as well.
     
  5. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    I haven't seen the movie, but my health nut mom could have told you similar info yrs ago. The last time she ate a hamburger was before I was born. She eats no pork or any type of beef. She does eat fish & turkey though.

    Also, don't forget about all the insects that are allowed into every so many pounds of food, such as earthworms, roaches, rat hair, etc.

    Yummy! :)
     
  6. Jem

    Jem Aficionado

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    Yes-they said that each hamburger you eat contains meat from hundreds of cows, and that manure/hide/bones gets all mixed in, which is why it's so hard to control bacteria outbreaks.

    And watching the chickens not being able to walk was heartbreaking.

    I had a bit of a revelation the other day, standing in line at Subway. I wanted to get the Cold Cut Combo, and in () behind the name of the sub it said: Ham, Bologna and Salami, all turkey based. What?!? How can HAM and SALAMI be turkey based?? I'm beginning to feel really deceived by my food! Grrr. This the last thing I need right now, to worry about what in my food... I've given the task to dh. :haha: But he's out of town this week, so I'll have to struggle through the next few days....
     
  7. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

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    Jem, I saw this movie not too long ago. I also read his book. He goes more into depth about certain things not covered in the movie. I'm still working on the book. He begins to explain the rise of fast food restaurants. It's really interesting.

    My heart also broke just watching the chickens suffer.

    But, I've known these things since I was a teen. So, that is why I became a vegetarian. If we were living like the Native Americans, and hunted our own food, and gave thanks to the animal's spirit, it'd be one thing. But, more likely than not, most people dont even think twice about where their food came from.

    Heck, most people don't WANT to know. If a person knew how their food was processed an they chose to continue to eat, that's one thing. It's the people who refuse to even listen, to learn, to know what goes on in the slaughterhouse and before the animal even gets there, those are the people I have a hard time liking.
     
  8. chemteach55

    chemteach55 Connoisseur

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    My hubby does not allow me to watch movies like this because I would stop serving meat all together. As it is, I will only serve it 1-2x per week. I cut it down to that after my neighbor killed his cow. He had the most beautiful white cow in the pasture behind my house. She would come right up to the fence to visit with us. One day "Snowflake" was gone and my husband informed me that she was now living in our neighbor's freezer. For weeks after that I would not allow meat in the house.

    Now diet coke is another story, I live on it and sprite.
     
  9. Blue

    Blue Aficionado

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    Chemteach, Your comment about Snowflake brought back memories of my parents. They raised beef, and my kids would name the cows. Alas, one day the kids realized where their beef came from.
     
  10. KinderCowgirl

    KinderCowgirl Phenom

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    My students were arguing about that the other day. A student said "you know you're eating cow don't you" and she said "no I'm not, I'm eating a hamburger". They still haven't made the connection between chickens and chicken nuggets.

    You guys might like this site: http://www.thekindlife.com/
     
  11. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    I've been a vegetarian for 8 years...not a vegan, I still eat eggs and fish...Never thought about food production, still prefer not to.
     
  12. kcjo13

    kcjo13 Phenom

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    I think a lot depends on your geographical area. I live in beef country, and that's what we eat here. I don't know a single vegetarian. Carrie Underwood did a concert not far from here a few years ago and got booed off the stage for making some comment about not eating meat.

    In our freezer right now is what is left of one of my student's 4-H beefs, and the calf we raised from birth (Daisy) is ready for pickup at the locker. It happens.
     
  13. lnm130

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    Feb 21, 2010

    I grew up on a farm and live in a house full of hunters. Freezer full of different meat. Pheasant, rabbit, venison...I guess it's never bothered me where the meat come from because of this. It does bother me how the animals are treated within these huge corporations, however.

    How funny, I was just watching Fast Food Nation, then I get on here and there is this thread!
     
  14. Jem

    Jem Aficionado

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    I have no problem with meat-I love it, especially beef, but I don't care for the thought that it's being soaked in chemicals before I eat it. I went to Whole Foods tonight for dinner, and ended up getting anti-biotic free chicken from a local farm and a tiki masala sauce with all natural spices and herbs. No corn syrup or preservatives I can't pronounce. This is going to be really tough, but I'm going to try it. I just can't trust the FDA after that movie-they use to conduct something like 50k+ inspections a year on food companies. Now they conduct around 8k. And the supreme court has taken away their ability to shut down companies that fail inspections, so I can't even trust those.
     
  15. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

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    I don't think people should give up meat if they don't want to. It's just, I wish these animals had a chance to at least run around in the grass and sun. Give these animals a chance to live before being slaughtered/hunted, at least! And, I think we need to give animals a fighting chance when we do hunt them down. No deer pee to lure them in.
     
  16. lilmisses1014

    lilmisses1014 Comrade

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    Feb 21, 2010

    Um, ew.

    I had a health scare recently which has forced me to pay even more attention to my diet and beauty routines. Thankfully we have a Trader Joe's near me, so I can buy healthy/organic foods and not go seriously broke. (If only we could get a Whole Foods here....)

    I love beef and chicken too much to give it up completely (and my husband would never go for it!), but I am going to start looking at buying organic.

    As far as ground beef coming from hundreds of cows and including who-knows-what, my BIL and his wife grind their own meat for that reason. I should start doing the same thing.
     
  17. mrachelle87

    mrachelle87 Fanatic

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    Feb 22, 2010

    I am a farmers wife. We eat a lot of beef and pork. We raise pork and lamb. I can't bring myself to eat the lamb. We butcher all our own beef and pork. The beef comes from my husband's FFA students. While I agree that some processing plants can and do these things, that movie is not the whole picture. If you use local meat shops that get their products locally, you are not getting meat treated that way. Our local butcher is a wonderful Mennonite couple that take pride in their product. They have glass walls so you can see the processing plant.

    While you hear about organic, and it is great in small farms, please research it. It isn't as great for our environment as some people lead you to think.
     
  18. Ms. I

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    Speaking of this, Tony Little (health & fitness guy) swears by bison, the alternative for red meat. He sells his free-range meat on HSN. It's supposed to be less fat, calories, & it tastes better than beef. Anyone try it? I'd like to see how it tastes.

    Yrs ago, my mom bought ostrich burgers here & there. They tasted good. :)
     
  19. mrachelle87

    mrachelle87 Fanatic

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    I love bison. It can be used in any recipe that calls for beef.
     
  20. Ms. I

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    Yes, it seems good. What store(s) do you buy yours from?
     
  21. mrachelle87

    mrachelle87 Fanatic

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  22. Jem

    Jem Aficionado

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    Yes, I think local growers/butchers are the way to go. We're just going to have to put in some time to research our options.
     
  23. blindteacher

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    This is why my wife and I have decided to eat organic meat only.
     
  24. Unbeknownst

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    Mmmmmmmm, meeeeeeeeeeat.
     
  25. DizneeTeachR

    DizneeTeachR Virtuoso

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    We have a bison farm close to us. They are free roaming (well, fenced...but not a corporation) that sells them. We also know someone who raises cow on the "healthier" feed & what not so they are more orgnic to eat.

    We used to have venison all the time. I remember my mom making something with ground beef (instead of ground venison) & I said why does this taste so funny?!?LOL!!!
     
  26. silverspoon65

    silverspoon65 Enthusiast

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    I am adapting a lot of clean eating habits and BF and I try to shop locally at the farmer's market as much as possible.

    That said, I grew up on a chicken farm that grew for a major brand of chicken. Living there, I understand why they do what they do. I don't always agree with everything, but I never really questioned it. I have seen my grandmother step on a sick or crippled chick to kill it without even giving it a second though. And those chickens are crammed into that house. But unlike everyone else that works for the company (or most jobs) she was paid per chicken. She was paid to produce. If they cut back the # of chickens, it wouldn't be worth it for her to put up the houses and keep that job. Or the company would have to drive up the cost of the chicken.

    I pay about $8 for a pack of chicken breasts. If you cut those chickens by 50%, that chicken costs $16 a pack. Cut out the horomones and antibiotics and it might be $20 a pack. If you are on a fixed income, that's a luxury.

    I guess my point is, I agree that there are things in meat I don't want to eat, and methods I don't agree with, and I choose to buy at a farmer's market, etc, as much as possible. However, the mass production of food in this country does make it cheap and available to a lot of people who might otherwise starve.
     
  27. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

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    I respectfully disagree. We don't have to treat these animals cruelly. The whole point is to not prevent people from starving. The whole point to mass production is to produce meat as cheaply as possible, like you said.

    Fast food companies have been around for about 100 years. In the beginning, less meat was produced as cows and chickens were smaller. Yet, fast food was still affordable. Hamburgers were 15 cents back in the 50s.
     
  28. creativemonster

    creativemonster Comrade

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    At the end of the film there is a web site listed (can't remember what it's called of course) and there are ideas for things we can do. Consumers, they point out in the film, have a lot of power. We can ask farmer's markets to accept food stamps. We can show our preferences with our wallets. It's not just the meat by the way - soy beans are now a huge issue. There is a corporation that owns the ...copyright? on the genetically modified soybean. The film also covers this. Great film.
     
  29. mrachelle87

    mrachelle87 Fanatic

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    Not every processing plant is like those in the film. Please get your facts...the whole facts, not just the ones that a movie maker wants to shock you with, before you decide. I have been in agriculture for the last twenty years. We have been pork producers. We are currently producing lambs. My husband coaches a meat team that makes numerous trips to processing plants in Texas, Oklahoma, and Kansas. We have also taken trips to Montana and Colorado with these teams to prepare for national contest. We have been there on slaughter day. Yes, it is sad to know that these animals are about to die, but it is a fact of life. Animals have to die if you want to eat that steak. God even sanctioned it in the Bible. I have never seen the conditions shown in that movie. I am not saying that it doesn't happen, but most producers and processers respect the animal. It is their livelihood.
     
  30. silverspoon65

    silverspoon65 Enthusiast

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    I guess when I think of "cruel" I think of people being mean on purpose. I don't think that is the case with most farms I have been to. No one is mean to animals for the sake of being mean to them. But in order to turn profits and meet demands you need to raise a certain # of chickens, using a minimal amount of labor, trucks, houses, etc. If that means you accidentally hurt an animal that is getting ready to be killed for meat, or have to put it out of its misery, I don't really see that as being cruel.

    Also, in the 1950's the average salary was less than $3000 a year, which means a .15 cheeseburger was the equivalent to $2.50 today. However, they only cost .89 at McDonalds the last I checked. I would say that is a pretty significant decrease in cost, making food more affordable to the masses.
     
  31. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

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    I do know that many chickens have their beaks removed. I also know that since they are pumped full of hormones, they are unable to walk. I also know that many chickens are kept in cages, jammed packed, many never see the sun or able to walk/run around.
    I just think, treating these animals in this manner just for "steak" seems really sad to me. I mean, if we hunted our own animals and gave thanks, that is one thing. But, nowadays, a lot of people don't really think twice about where their meat came from or how it was processed.
     
  32. silverspoon65

    silverspoon65 Enthusiast

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    I do think this is true. Does anyone watch the F-Word with Gordon Ramsay on BBC? He calls it the F-Word because FOOD has become a 4 letter word. One of his really big things is every season he raises an animal in his back yard, with his children, and teaches them about the whole process of where their meat comes from. He also has segments about other sustainable foods, and food advocacy.
     
  33. mrachelle87

    mrachelle87 Fanatic

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    1st-My husband's first job was to inspect chicken farms for that big chicken producer. I can honestly say he NEVER saw beaks cut off of chicks. And no, most don't see sunlight. They are kept in large barns. By allowing the chicks out, they are exposed to predators that the producer doesn't need to worry about.

    2nd-I have many friends (at least 6 that I can come up with on the top of my head) that run pork farms for a major pork provider. They have very clean barns. When you visit, you have to wear their shoes because you might bring germs into their barns. The animals are treated with respect for the fact that their families depend on the animal.
     

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