Floundering in life. Should I quit teaching?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by substitute_stev, Jan 13, 2015.

  1. cutieturtle07

    cutieturtle07 Rookie

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    Jan 17, 2015

    OP, I would like to ask have you ever considered teaching abroad? Possibly English as a Second Language or in an international school. I LOVED my job in South Korea. It was challenging at first, but I eventually got the hang of it. The students are a lot more respectful and the job in general did not hold the responsibilities that I have in my current teaching job.

    No contacting parents.
    No creating assessments or tracking progress.
    One meeting a month.
    No taking work home.
    From 8-4:30, I sat in the office for literally half that time on some days.

    The list goes on. I lessoned planned on all of my down time and always had fun giving the lessons. I taught English conversation. It was more of an ancillary or special period for the students. They still had their other regular education courses.

    It was never mundane, because it was a completely different country/culture. Always something to explore and see. I travelled to multiple countries during my time there and am also planning to go back abroad after one more teaching year here in the states.

    The great thing about teaching abroad is you can pick pretty much any country and change it up constantly.
     
  2. GeetGeet

    GeetGeet Companion

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    Jan 17, 2015

    I agree with this ALOT. I am certainly an introvert and I do find teaching extremely exhausting. I do fine and love the social aspect of teaching for the most part, but when I get home I just want to be alone and have it be quiet. Kids are great but they aren't fully socialized and they all want all of your attention at all times, they don't always realize that you are just one person with limits. I find it rattles my nerves and I need a lot of downtime to recover.

    This is difficult for my husband, who is an extrovert with an office job, because when he gets home he wants to "DO" stuff all the time and see people. Occasionally he thinks I am antisocial or depressed but he doesn't realize how social my job is at all times and how difficult that can be for someone who needs a lot of alone time.
     
  3. GeetGeet

    GeetGeet Companion

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    Jan 17, 2015

    I do leave school at 3:30 most days (we can leave 3:20 the earliest), but I take a decent amount of work home. I find that I need to leave the building sometimes so I can unwind, but I don't mind grading and lesson planning at home for an hour or so each day if I need to. I am also fine with spending some time on the weekends making rubrics or presentations. I do think there are teachers who have been working for years that have a pretty set curriculum and therefore can get away with doing a little less outside of the school day. The first few years are more difficult in this respect. Just know that as you gain experience you have more lessons already made and are definitely able to manage time better. So if you go back into teaching just know that after the first year or two it isn't as difficult.
     
  4. substitute_stev

    substitute_stev Rookie

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    Jan 17, 2015

    I'm reading all the posts. However, I am not depressed and do not want to teach abroad.

    I enjoy jobs that are "moderately" social.

    When I arrive at school in the morning I am happy to be there. I thrive off the energy from the kids in the morning.

    After lunch I am wanting the day to be over and start to get annoyed by the constant child attention.

    When I was a full-time teacher I had to rest my head on my desk for about 15 min to unwind from the drama and get ready to grade papers and prepare lesson plans for the next day. It burned me out.
    When my teaching career ended I felt like a 100lb pack was taken off my back. It was an awesome feeling.

    I enjoy teaching---it's just is the forced 8 hours of public speaking, being a police officer, a counselor, a nurse, and a teacher that wears me out.

    Extroverts seem to shine in this field.
     
  5. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    Jan 17, 2015

    I kind of felt the same way Steve. If only school dismissed at 12 noon & they can just go home & stay home for lunch!
     
  6. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Jan 17, 2015

    There are plenty of introverts here on the forums who find fulfillment and success in this profession.
     
  7. yellowdaisies

    yellowdaisies Fanatic

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    Jan 17, 2015

    :thumb::thumb:

    I'm an introvert. When I come home, I take time to read, watch TV, and relax with my husband. I also tend to take at least one day to do nothing on the weekends. I'm perfectly happy. I love teaching and couldn't imagine doing anything else. I just have to make sure to balance my life and take time for myself.
     
  8. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Jan 17, 2015

    I could have written these exact words.
     
  9. EMonkey

    EMonkey Connoisseur

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    Jan 17, 2015

    You might consider doing a prep teacher job. You have to set up your lesson plans. But you are not with the same kids all day or even more than one day a week. I also have noticed that the prep teachers are usually gone earlier than classroom teachers.
     
  10. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Jan 17, 2015

    What is a prep teacher?
     
  11. substitute_stev

    substitute_stev Rookie

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    Jan 18, 2015

    I've had 50 jobs in my life. You name it and I have done it. Teaching is the only career I've held. Nursing, teaching, social work, cop---all of it burns you out when you work with the general public.
    I got to find another line of work.
    B2B Sales or some sort of corporate trainer position would be good.
     
  12. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    Jan 18, 2015

    I think that is the problem. I once was taught by a wise man to "Always take the good with the bad." Every job has its positives and negatives. It might be better to find ways to increase the positives and decrease the negatives in a job. For example, I don't like my long commute to work, but I listen to audio books in the car and it makes it better. I don't like grading, so I put on my favorite music while I grade papers. You have a lot of control over how much you like or dislike a job. Don't give up all that power to your bosses and you'll be a happier man at work. You sound like a person with a fair amount of energy, so I think you can make it happen.
     
  13. substitute_stev

    substitute_stev Rookie

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    Jan 18, 2015

    I have a lot of energy.

    I started working at 14 years of age on our farm picking up rocks in the fields, then later a doctor's office to earn a real paycheck.

    In all my jobs there were a lot of things I enjoyed doing more than others.

    For example, I like my independence, public speaking, mixture of indoors/ outdoors, tons of variety, meeting different people, on my feet and moving(not sitting at a desk), and being physical.

    My best jobs were Bellhop and Actor. I loved the hotel industry because it was so much fun, luxurious, and offered so much variety. The hotel businesss was sustainable because there were a lot of down days where you stand around and other days where you rock and roll when its busy.
    I tried moving up the ladder, but the conventional stuff bored the heck out of me such as sitting behind a computer, the paperwork, and being behind the scenes, etc. I needed to be out front rubbing elbows with the guests and hustling.:woot: I love entertainment.
    I tried getting back into the hotel industry but since 911 it has changed.

    My worst jobs were bank teller and accounts payable rep.
    I hate anything that has do with structured environments such as banking, math, numbers, manufacturing, business, engineering, cubicles, routines, and sitting on my rear 8 hours a day.

    I need excitement mixed in with periods of downtime. Hotels offered that model beautifully.
     
  14. substitute_stev

    substitute_stev Rookie

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    Jan 18, 2015

    :)
     
  15. dgpiaffeteach

    dgpiaffeteach Aficionado

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    Jan 18, 2015

    I know a few people in sales. It can be a lot of sitting in meetings. As an introvert, I find the stress of sales to be so much higher socially. Thankfully my mother is an extrovert and has been extremely successful.
     
  16. substitute_stev

    substitute_stev Rookie

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    Jan 18, 2015

    Yes, sales can have its drain days---socially speaking. I find it less tiresome than teaching though.
     
  17. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    Jan 18, 2015

    I'm not sure why you ever went into teaching - it isn't glamorous or fun in the traditional sense, but I have some doubts that any job will ever meet your expectations. If you are happy going from job to job, so be it. I have had several jobs that I liked, that were fast moving and fun in an odd way, but not one of those gave me a steady income with a stable future. You don't say whether of not you are responsible for a family, or if you only need to satisfy yourself. If it is only the latter, then if you make enough money to provide for yourself, do whatever strikes your fancy. No one here would try to talk you into teaching when it obviously repulses you on many levels. I couldn't be happy jumping from thing to thing, unsure how fast the bloom would leave the rose. You may end up with more "adventure" in your life than most of us, but I will accept the challenges within my life that require me to think creatively and solve problems and difficult situations. You may be an explorer who would have been happier in a different era, finding new continents, following the gold rush, or being an innovative business baron. Teaching has all of the things that you like least - you must deal with the public, do the same things over and over, and year after year. I suspect that you could never be truly happy pursuing this as a career over the long haul. No one on this forum will blame you for jumping from one job to another, but I, personally, would think that potential students would be better served by educators who are more committed to teaching. I pass no judgement on what you will want to try next, but only hope that you find something you can love until the next thrill comes along.

    Be well and enjoy your adventures - I couldn't stand the uncertainty or constant change, but that's just me. I wish you well, but I will stay with teaching. For me it is a calling that completes me, and I consider myself lucky to be happy in what I do. May you find the same satisfaction in your life at some point. :peace:
     

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