Floundering in life. Should I quit teaching?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by substitute_stev, Jan 13, 2015.

  1. substitute_stev

    substitute_stev Rookie

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2015
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jan 13, 2015

    After a series of ditch digging jobs and working in hotels as a bellhop for 15 years I decided to change my life and do something worthwhile.

    So I went back to college at age 35, got my bachelors degree and became a teacher. I made my family/friends proud of me because in high school I was voted "least likely to succeed." (That label was damaging to my self-esteem but drove me to do something with my life)

    In 2007 I started out as a substitute teacher. Then in 2009 I became a full-time teacher. I finally made something of myself!

    After two years of being a full-time teacher my passion for teaching went out like a flame. Public school teaching was very stressful and I started to lose my health. I realized teaching was not a good fit either.
    Anyway, as luck would have it I was laid off. I felt relieved---no more long days in my classroom, no more disciplinary issues, no more grading papers at home, no more parent calls, and no more detention slips.
    The stress disappeared. I regained my health and started to feel good again. It took me over a year to recover from teaching.

    I decided to build a "lifestyle" and not a career. So I went back to substitute teaching(taking a step down) and got a job in sales part-time.
    When I see my former colleagues they say to me...."Steve you are NOT a substitute, you are a teacher! Go back to full-time teaching." I tell them--"no, its too much of a grind and do not want the stress of full-time teaching again."
    I do feel like I am overqualified as a substitute. That's the hardest part to swallow, as if I am not living up to my potential.

    I am at a cross-roads and thinking of quitting subbing altogether since I am going nowhere in life and do not plan on going back to full-time teaching. Do teachers demote themselves to being substitutes?
    Subbing is too easy---but I like the lifestyle. I dislike full-time teaching because of the routine. I dislike seeing the same faces everyday. I dislike meetings. I dislike the huge amount of responsibility. Teaching takes too much of my personal time.
    However, as a substitute I enjoy the variety, meeting different students every day, love the independence and flexibility. I enjoy leaving at the end of the day and saying "goodbye" to the administrators. I can go home and workout in the gym or go hiking with my dog at 3pm--not staying until 6pm grading papers.

    The only thing that sucks is the very low pay. I am self-loathing and depressed that I am not doing better in life and know I should be doing better.
    I wish there was a career that gave me the flexibility, independence, and lifestyle were I could be a free-agent with the benefits and salary. Does a job exist? Flight attendant? Sales?

    Any helpful ideas on a new career?
     
  2.  
  3. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2001
    Messages:
    24,950
    Likes Received:
    2,102

    Jan 13, 2015

    If you can afford your 'lifestyle' doing what you are doing and you are enjoying it, keep it up! Don't let others define you. YOU ARE NOT what your HS superlative predicted.:hugs:
     
  4. dgpiaffeteach

    dgpiaffeteach Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2011
    Messages:
    3,224
    Likes Received:
    147

    Jan 13, 2015

    Do realize that not all teaching jobs are the same. I do leave most days by 3:30. I don't take a lot of work home. I have a great admin and very few meetings. It may be worth trying out a new location :)

    My mom is in sales. She's on all the time. I could never handle the stress! Her customers expect to be able to reach her basically whenever they need. My students' parents are pleasantly surprised when I reply outside of contract hours and they don't have my phone number :)
     
  5. creativemonster

    creativemonster Comrade

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2006
    Messages:
    433
    Likes Received:
    109

    Jan 13, 2015

    Subbing is not a "demotion," it is a different job. Yes, it pays less in take home pay, but true hourly pay might not be that much less. IF you can handle living on a lower salary, it is a great job. I did it for years before teaching full time and am envious of those who can swing being a professional sub. When I was able to do it, I LOVED it. Later I decided it made me happier to have the security of full time teaching. It is a decision that YOU can make for YOU. The full time teachers who are telling you that you should be a full time teacher mean well - but they aren't you.
    You mentioned that you are doing sales part time. Do you enjoy it? That, to me, sounds difficult and stress filled. I couldn't do it.

    I love teaching, but I admit that for me it is not a calling, it is a job. I like the salary, my coworkers, and my students, so I consider myself pretty lucky, (ok, very lucky!) but I'm there for the paycheck. And yeah, I hate all the extra hours and other parts of the job get on my last nerve, but when I weigh those issues against why I am there, (security of job - get to learn cool stuff from my students - amazing coworkers) I decide to stay. It's a trade off at times. ...Guess mostly just wanted to say you aren't alone with this feeling - I think many of us go through this our whole lives. And by us I don't mean teachers, I mean adults. ...artists, teachers, others who might take their jobs home after work and or not get time to do other creative or fun stuff.
     
  6. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2010
    Messages:
    4,767
    Likes Received:
    994

    Jan 13, 2015

    Have you thought about teaching part time? There are positions from time to time that are 50 % more or even less. Usually there probably aren't as many applicants for those position (I think). If you taught part time, let's say 3 classes / day, your workload would be half, so it could be manageable, and I assume the stress would be half, or maybe not even any. The pay wouldn't be as a full time teacher's as it would be prorated, but you'd still make more than you make now subbing and it would be consistent work. So you could the same in 3-4 hours as you're making now working 6-7 hours.

    You would still need to deal with seeing the same faces every day, but would that be a deal breaker for you?
     
  7. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

    Joined:
    May 13, 2004
    Messages:
    5,827
    Likes Received:
    140

    Jan 13, 2015

    OP, I understand how you feel! Growing up & back in my undergrad yrs, I never wanted to be a teacher...a career working w/ kids yes, but a teacher, no. Although I always knew I'd go to college, which I did straight out of HS, I seemed to have done things later in life than most others: Job, moving out, marriage, having kids (of which I'm still not married nor have kids yet) & I'm no longer in my 20s.

    I was a substitute for a good 11 yrs throughout my 20s, while in school pursuing a Masters & having a part-time, non-education-related job. Became a special ed teacher briefly. It was so-so. Decided to switch gears to SLP (speech-language pathology) in which the pretty good $ is if you have a Masters. Being a SLPA (speech-lang. path. asst.) isn't too shabby of a salary either though & I also earned my SLPA license to always fall back on.

    In my opinion, females have a little easier way careerwise (in a certain way) because if they are a substitute teacher, for example, their husband probably has the better-paying job & things are OK. However, if the male is a substitute, which isn't that much pay in general & no benefits, how will he support a wife?...unless I guess the wife has a better job & they don't have a problem w/ the wife making more.

    At this point, I wouldn't really want to go back to subbing either. I'd feel way too overqualified & that I should be doing more w/ my life also. I'm guessing you're about 43-46. Are you married w/ children at all? If you don't want to get married & are content w/ you & your dog, which there's nothing wrong with, then great!
     
  8. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

    Joined:
    May 19, 2007
    Messages:
    6,505
    Likes Received:
    1,417

    Jan 14, 2015

    Life is way too short to spend it miserable. If you are happy in life and can live on a smaller income, keep on doing what you are doing.

    If you really want to continue this life style, could you consider moving to an area that pays subs more?
     
  9. GeetGeet

    GeetGeet Companion

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2012
    Messages:
    194
    Likes Received:
    9

    Jan 14, 2015

    I suspect that a lot of what you are experiencing is rooted in your self-image. It is very difficult to be good at anything if you have little confidence and anxiety about your ability to succeed. I had extreme insecurity in my younger years (and still have it to some extent), and that anxiety will exhaust you, and you might mistake the exhaustion and frustration as a result of teaching when it is actually coming from your anxiety and poor self-esteem.

    So much of teaching is what you make of it. If you think things are getting routine, then you should think of ways to make it less so. You can definitely make teaching non-routine!

    Teaching IS a lot of responsibility, and you need to have confidence in your abilities or the responsibility will feel more overwhelming than it has to be.

    All jobs take up personal time. It's part of being an adult and yes, it sucks. But the longer you teach, the better and more efficient you get at it, and you can find ways of creating more personal time.

    It also seems like you might have put "personal time" ahead of other priorities and it might be time to change that by finding ways to be happy while working.

    Based on what you have said here, I think you can definitely be a teacher and love it…but you might want to consider working on your mindset and negative feelings toward yourself. Once you tackle that, things will come more easily, I believe. Good luck!
     
  10. teacherguy111

    teacherguy111 Cohort

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2013
    Messages:
    573
    Likes Received:
    29

    Jan 14, 2015

    Here is my advice…. do what you want! Don't worry about what other people say or tell you about whether you are not a real teacher or not. If you like your lifestyle, keep doing it.
     
  11. stephenpe

    stephenpe Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2003
    Messages:
    1,923
    Likes Received:
    149

    Jan 14, 2015

    sub steve. My name is steve. Before I went to college I did the ditch digging for a year to save for college. In 1973-74 I banked 3 grand and that (believe it or not) paid all my tuition for four years.
    My first teaching job was tough. Middle school. Some places suck to work at and some are amazing. If you are single I would look around. I bet Alaska would pay well and be a real adventure and be a great job with rural kids that appreciate you. I bet many small rural places would like a guy to come in a teach. But you gotta do what makes you happy. Just realize that some positions are much different than others.

    PM me if you want to talk more. I have been doing this for 35 years.
     
  12. teacherguy111

    teacherguy111 Cohort

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2013
    Messages:
    573
    Likes Received:
    29

    Jan 14, 2015

    I agree with the posts that say that experiences can definitely differ depending on what kind of school you are at. My wife typically leaves about half an hour after school and does not work on any school stuff at home.
     
  13. greendream

    greendream Cohort

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2011
    Messages:
    602
    Likes Received:
    131

    Jan 14, 2015

    No they don't. The secretaries in my building don't take work home with them. Pizza delivery drivers don't. Wal-Mart cashiers don't. Substitute teachers don't.

    Some professions require a LOT more work on personal time than others. Teaching is one of them. OP doesn't like it, and I agree with him.
     
  14. GeetGeet

    GeetGeet Companion

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2012
    Messages:
    194
    Likes Received:
    9

    Jan 14, 2015

    I will correct myself--most jobs take up some personal time. Especially those that are challenging and provide personal fulfillment.
     
  15. Pashtun

    Pashtun Fanatic

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2013
    Messages:
    2,985
    Likes Received:
    435

    Jan 14, 2015

    I like being in control of my personal time. All holidays off, good health benefits, better pay.

    I consider the ones you listed as a job, teaching is a career, imo.

    Every job has pros and cons, I would never choose one of those jobs you listed unless I money was no issue.
     
  16. ecteach

    ecteach Devotee

    Joined:
    May 25, 2012
    Messages:
    1,151
    Likes Received:
    65

    Jan 14, 2015

    If you like subbing, then sub! When I had my son, I quit teaching for 2 years. I tried subbing, but hated it. I like knowing what I'm walking into every day.

    I got a job as a case manager, and it was the easiest job I ever had. 8:30-5:00, and I could actually leave around 3:00 to do home visits, and no one ever questioned if we came back. I got to enjoy real lunches with co-workers at actual restaurants.

    There was one issue: It only paid $19,670/year. After two years I was ready to go back to teaching, and I am glad I did. During my time as a case manager I sort of felt the same way as you, but only because of the pay.

    My job as a case manager opened my eyes to countless things, and changed my teaching style a lot. I would never give up those 2 years. I'm sure you learn something everyday that would help you if you do decide to return to teaching.
     
  17. substitute_stev

    substitute_stev Rookie

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2015
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jan 14, 2015

    All good posts.

    I like having more personal time and variety---it doesn't have anything to do with poor self-image. I dress up, feel good about myself, confident, thrive in "alone situations" like writing or creating activities --- and some social situations. Yes, my anxiety is caused from being an introvert in an extroverted classroom with kids all around me all the time everyday. Too many kids is like a rush of adrenaline---and too much of it makes me anxious.
    A good example is New York City. The city has a lot of energy and you feed off it for a short time and then after a while the energy starts to feed off you.
    My social tolerance is low. I can teach for 2-3 days a week and then after that I get socially worn out. I need more time to recharge my batteries. After the 3rd day I am miserable. After my teaching career ended it took a year to get over the rattled nerves of kids all day, every day for a year. But when I sub--my energy level is high for about two days and I shine.

    I just left a school today at 3pm, arrived at home, went on a hike with my dog, ran errands, set up some investments for myself, had dinner, spent time with my girlfriend, now going to work out.....and its only 6:00pm. There are still some teachers still at their desks working right now and have to get up at 6am and start all over again. Ouch.

    Even though I work less hours as a sub, the pay and security sucks overall and I can barely pay my bills---but love, love, love the lifestyle.

    I wish there were careers that paid a lot more with less hours. OR I found a career that WAS MY LIFE. I haven't found it yet.
    Until then I grumble and moan to get to work to make money.
    I love my part-time gig in sales---its work from home. I love it and less people contact. But the pay stinks.

    The only career I can think of where you can make a lot of money with less hours is pharmaceutical sales. But they usually hire young pretty girls out of college. I applied 50 times to a pharm. job with no luck.
     
  18. dgpiaffeteach

    dgpiaffeteach Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2011
    Messages:
    3,224
    Likes Received:
    147

    Jan 14, 2015

    There are also good teachers who left at 3, went home, played with their dog, and will go out to dinner with friends in an hour. If you manage your time well and find the right school, you won't need to take work home.

    If that's your only reason, I'd look back into teaching :)

    It can be socially draining. I'm an introvert, so I understand! But I also like my colleagues and boss and students. They're good people!
     
  19. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2005
    Messages:
    5,472
    Likes Received:
    982

    Jan 14, 2015

    I don't take work home. I don't soend a lot of home after school. The time I do soend is for extra duty things like having interns and bring part of leadership activities. Not regular school duties.

    Maybe try a different job in education. I was a home/hospital teacher one year. I was a district employee, and I worked in all the schools. I went to the homes of students on medical leave from school. I liked teaching them one-on-one, and I really got to know them.

    For short-term students, I picked up and delivered work from the teachers. For long-term students, I was their teacher of record. I only worked with teachers if I needed materials.

    I had full teacher pay and benefits. I made my own schedule. I was paid mileage.

    I chose a school to be my station, and when I wasn't working with homebound kids, I worked in the building. Library. SED classes. Secretarial duties. Whatever needed to be done.
     
  20. substitute_stev

    substitute_stev Rookie

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2015
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jan 14, 2015

    Ima,

    That sounds like a decent gig.

    After reading some of these posts some teachers leave school at 3pm. How is that possible? Either their lesson plans are not meeting benchmarks or they are grading papers/tests in class or or they are bringing their work home with them. They also have meetings, parent calls, and lesson plans to prepare. My experience was that of a normal teacher and myself working 60 hour weeks. Not one teacher skated out at 3pm---unless they were slacking or a PE teacher.
     
  21. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

    Joined:
    May 13, 2004
    Messages:
    5,827
    Likes Received:
    140

    Jan 14, 2015

    I won't say it's impossible, but it's tough to say that a teacher can leave on the dot at 3pm all 5 days a week or at least most of the time & still do everything they need to. I actually did it when I was an RSP teacher for a year, but I'm sure there was always a little more I could have done because teaching is just one of those jobs that can consume you if you let it. There's ALWAYS something more to do.

    But, I agree w/ ya Steve. Subbing is nice. I quite enjoyed it while it lasted! No taking anything home ever, not stuck w/ same coworkers or kids, different change of scenery, pretty much walking out the door at the dismissal time, none of the things that come along w/ permanent teaching (staff mtgs, report cards, parent nights, being observed, writing lessons, etc.). It's also nice when you get a long-term sub job, which I've had plenty of those, even lasting the whole school year, so that's steadier money! If only subbing paid benefits!
     
  22. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2010
    Messages:
    3,015
    Likes Received:
    473

    Jan 14, 2015

    :agreed:
     
  23. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2010
    Messages:
    3,015
    Likes Received:
    473

    Jan 14, 2015

    Another idea is that you can be a substitute teacher and then get a fairly decent paying summer job. Possibly even teach summer school (which personally I find a lot less stressful..i.e. no meetings, and often no standardized tests etc.)
     
  24. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2005
    Messages:
    5,472
    Likes Received:
    982

    Jan 14, 2015

    The way I see it, there will ALWAYS be something that I could be doing for school. I could fill 24 hours a day with school activities, but I most things do not have to be done.

    I am required to . . .
    • plan lessons
    • address all content standards
    • have grades in the computer by noon every Wednesday
    • be in the building from 7:45 to 3:15

    I get to school around 7:40. Kids are in my room starting at 7:45. They work on homework, Accelerated Math, or read until 8:10. During that time I can email parents, have quick student meetings, do quick bits of paperwork. Students grade a lot of their own work as we discuss in class. I stagger due dates of large projects and writings so I'm not having all of them to grade at once. I use my planning period to work. I have meetings a day or two a week or meet with kids or grade papers or put grades in the computer. Sometimes I meet with my grade-level partner.

    Kids leave at 3:00. We have to stay until 3:15. Usually I stay until 3:30, sometimes 4:00. Just making sure my room is ready for the next day. Kids do a lot of stuff, like change the date on the board, clean desks, straighten rows, pick up stuff that was left out.

    Most weeks I run to school on Sunday afternoon after church for an hour or two to make copies, write plans, update my class Facebook page, and grade papers & enter grades.

    I always have to-do list as well. I make sure that it is divided by importance. Things that need to be done today vs things that can wait until later vs. things that don't even really have to be done, but would be nice to have done.

    I'm single, no kids, no pets . . . so I could make teaching my life. I choose not to. I'm a much happier teacher when I have time to myself to live my own life. I go out to eat with friends. Shop. Spent time with my BF. Lounge on the couch. Go to the gym. I make time for me.
     
  25. substitute_stev

    substitute_stev Rookie

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2015
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jan 14, 2015

    Ms. I,

    Yes that is what I am talking about -- you are spot on.

    The same co-workers, the same kids, the same scenery, the same mundane tasks -- this is what caused a huge amount of stress.
    I prefer variety and stimulation -- otherwise I feel like I am dying inside.
    I had nothing against my co-workers(who were very nice and supportive).
    It was just the mundane routine that got to me----day in and day out of grading papers, giving lesson plans, preparing, and planning.

    I need action, entertainment, meeting new people and seeing different places. I went so far to get my CDL license to drive a truck OTR because I needed the constant variety of traveling.


    Sometimes I was so bored or exhausted with the routine of full-time teaching I wanted to run away and camp in the woods just to get away from it.

    Sitting in the same classroom day after day is boring. Office work would kill me. It is not part of my DNA. In fact, I have subbed in 4 different states across America in the last 5 years. I must have ADD.

    I just I could find a better paying job that offered all this variety and stimulation that I crave life would be good. BTW, truck driving was just as low paying as subbing. Flight attendant is low paying too. I am in sales now and hoping it will launch me into the corporate world where I can be "on the go."
     
  26. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

    Joined:
    May 13, 2004
    Messages:
    5,827
    Likes Received:
    140

    Jan 14, 2015

    Right Steve. You seem to have been in several various job industries, so you're familiar w/ the pay of them. I also like just working about 3 times a week.

    The last school I actually worked at as an SLP (2013-14) was probably THE BEST regarding flexibility & easy $ that I'll probably ever get in my life. It's a shame the boss was late on paying me, gave me bounced checks, & it got to the point to where I had no idea when she was going to pay me. There was no direct deposit there. So that one year was it.
     
  27. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2007
    Messages:
    14,468
    Likes Received:
    2,485

    Jan 14, 2015

    I just can't get past this. It seems like such a backwards, outdated way of thinking.
     
  28. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2007
    Messages:
    4,232
    Likes Received:
    1,176

    Jan 14, 2015

    I wholeheartedly disagree with this entire paragraph on so many levels.

    First off, who's to say that an adult female automatically has a husband?

    Secondly, why would you assume that a male substitute teacher with "low pay in general and no benefits" would need to support a wife?

    Why can't both partners (male/female, male/male, female/female) work without either of the two dwelling on who makes more?

    This way of thinking may've been typical several decades ago, Ms. I, but I believe you're misguided.
     
  29. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2007
    Messages:
    6,789
    Likes Received:
    158

    Jan 14, 2015

    I really think personal fulfillment and happiness are important. If you are happy and can afford a sub's salary, then I see nothing wrong. What is life if not to enjoy? What is success if not happiness and fulfillment? I think there is too much importance placed on money and material goods. We can get by with so much less. If you can afford your bills and you are enjoying life, then that is success right there, and you shouldn't feel bad about it.
     
  30. dgpiaffeteach

    dgpiaffeteach Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2011
    Messages:
    3,224
    Likes Received:
    147

    Jan 15, 2015

    My daily schedule:
    -required to be there from 7:45-3:10, students from 8-3
    -44 minutes of planning every day
    -22 minutes of lunch study hall every day (kids can do what they want, they just have to be in my room)
    -40 minutes for lunch

    I also teach high schoolers so the fact is that I can do things like reply to emails while they're writing in their journals. I check homework while they're doing bell work usually. We rarely have meetings. I have maybe one meeting a month that is outside school hours. Our principal finds us coverage during our lunch study halls so we don't have to sacrifice our time.

    With 60 minutes each day, I can get a lot done. There will always be things that don't get done that day, but it's okay. They will still be there the next day. I just have learned to accept that not everything will get done that day.

    I did spend a lot more time working my first year. But I don't have to worry as much about my lessons now. I'm teaching a novel for the fourth time. I have it down cold. All the documents I need are already made; they just require tweaking.
     
  31. Teachling

    Teachling Groupie

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2008
    Messages:
    1,488
    Likes Received:
    3

    Jan 15, 2015

    :up::up:

    So there with you on this! I'm still going through this and go back and forth constantly.
     
  32. cafekarma

    cafekarma Rookie

    Joined:
    May 4, 2013
    Messages:
    98
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jan 15, 2015

    I needed to read this thread. So many of you seem to have something that looks like a planning period during the day and have the possibility of leaving your work at work where it belongs. I have 20 min to eat lunch. That's it. Clearly, the point being made about finding the right school cannot be overemphasized. I'm not in the wrong profession. I'm in the wrong school.
     
  33. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

    Joined:
    May 13, 2004
    Messages:
    5,827
    Likes Received:
    140

    Jan 15, 2015

    Caesar753 & YoungTeacherGuy, well of course, that's why I said "to a certain degree". Sure, there's still lots of variables.

    Often, not always, people DO marry as opposed to staying single forever (and if someone's in a same-sex relationship, one of them has got to make more, less, or about the same than their partner).

    And although this part I'm about to say might be a bit old-fashioned, I personally would like my husband to make more than me. Yes, lots of women still like to feel taken care of by their mates. However, if I make about the same or little more, so be it. But many in society, I think, still assume that a husband makes more. Now, I know, these days there's a lot of house-husbands, etc., so if that works for them, great! Whether we agree w/ that or not is none of our business. Also, I'm all for women being independent as well & making her own money because one never knows when their marriage will end.

    So again, yes, lots of variables.
     
  34. greendream

    greendream Cohort

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2011
    Messages:
    602
    Likes Received:
    131

    Jan 15, 2015

    I completely understand your mindset. It may sound old-fashioned to say it out loud, but it's still usually the case that the husband makes more money. I honestly don't understand why people are getting upset about your statement when you clearly qualified it with the word probably.
     
  35. Koriemo

    Koriemo Comrade

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2014
    Messages:
    346
    Likes Received:
    24

    Jan 15, 2015

    I can relate to the boredom part of teaching because I cannot see myself being a teacher for 25 years. I can see myself teaching for 3-5 years, but I need variety in my schedule as well. Ideally, I will transition to being a part time teacher and start a small business on the side.

    However, I don't know if I would ever teach somewhere other than that school at which I currently work. I don't like the idea of taking much home with me. First year teachers are given an extra planning period at my school, so I have plenty of time to get things done at school. Our contract time is 7-3:30. We have morning meetings from 7-7:30, and I have two 45 minute planning periods plus a supervision period each day. I also get a 30 minute lunch and a 15 minute break. School ends at 2:50, so I have 40 minutes at the end of the day to get things done. I also have a student helper for one period every day who makes copies for me and does other tasks like that. It's great as a first year teacher to have that extra time.
     
  36. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

    Joined:
    May 13, 2004
    Messages:
    5,827
    Likes Received:
    140

    Jan 15, 2015

    greendream, thanks! :thumb:
     
  37. ecteach

    ecteach Devotee

    Joined:
    May 25, 2012
    Messages:
    1,151
    Likes Received:
    65

    Jan 15, 2015

    I just thought of this.....
    Have you every entertained the idea of being a teacher's assistant? You would probably make the same, maybe even a little more. You'd get benefits, and have the schedule you want.

    Look into it.
     
  38. daisycakes

    daisycakes Companion

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2014
    Messages:
    221
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jan 15, 2015

    I, too, find this sentiment offensive and ill-considered. How can you say such a thing in a world filled with studies about how women 1) make less; 2) are interrupted way more in meetings; 3) get absolutely no paid maternity leave and few job protections, etc. WOMEN HAVE IT HARDER CAREER-WISE. There is no other way to look at it.

    Not every woman is married or wants to be. Not every married woman has a wealthy husband. Not every woman wants to feel like she is secondary and earn less when she works just as hard as her husband.

    This really puts all of your materialistic posts about buying handbags or how you got $1,500, a chanel jumpsuit, an albino tiger and other ridiculous gifts for Christmas in perspective.
     
  39. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

    Joined:
    May 13, 2004
    Messages:
    5,827
    Likes Received:
    140

    Jan 16, 2015

    daisycakes, you obviously didn't read my other post after that & my BF sure isn't rich by any means. Gladly forget all I said in support of you in your other threads. Why should I care. Back to the OP's issue...
     
  40. DigitalDiva25

    DigitalDiva25 Companion

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2011
    Messages:
    137
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jan 16, 2015

    It seems like in every situation you are in, you seem to be depressed. Whether you are earning more money or not. Whether you have more time to yourself or not. Sometimes, I feel like this too…and I start to think, maybe it’s not the environment, the other people or the work that should change, maybe I should change...

    Take a look at this video that I found by Brendon Burchard, he has some really good tips on secrets to happiness:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OI9jv_KJsTw
     
  41. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2014
    Messages:
    9,802
    Likes Received:
    2,432

    Jan 16, 2015

    After reading the thread, I will deal with OP's dilemma - he would like to make more money doing fun and exciting things that are not mundane or boring. Wow, I bet most of us have experienced those feelings at one time or another. I will take some of the stress and routineness of a nice regular paycheck over the stress of not having enough money to pay my bills. It is a matter of priorities. If OP is fine with his lifestyle I would recommend pursuing it until he finds exactly what he finds that makes him happy. I do believe that DigitalDiva25 is on the right track - OP may need to do some serious soul searching to see what he may need to change to find joy in his work and personal life. Some people spend their entire lives going from one job to another, looking for elusive joy and job satisfaction, and I am not sure there is a valid answer to why it is so hard for these individuals. It's not a matter of good or bad, right or wrong - it just is the way it is. OP, do what works for you.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

Total: 335 (members: 1, guests: 318, robots: 16)
test