Florida MAX Teaching Salary?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Acamp, Jan 30, 2021.

  1. Acamp

    Acamp Companion

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    Jan 30, 2021

    Good evening everyone,
    For those who teach in Florida, what does the salary guide top off at for teachers? Also, how many years gets you to the top? Does a masters degree add any money to your pay in Florida? Looking to relocate to Florida to be closer to family if I can make it work with salary difference.

    Thanks in advance!
     
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  3. RainStorm

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    Jan 30, 2021

    Acamp,
    Every single school district in Florida has a different pay scale, and they vary widely. You would have to be more specific about the area that you are planning to move to. I will tell you that the pay here is terrible compared to other areas. Do not believe anything you see online about "average salaries" because most districts have changed how they pay, and the average you are seeing includes people who are grandfathered in to the old scales, so it is very deceiving.

    Let me give you an example of how awful it is in my area of Florida. First, the new pay scales here will not give you more than 7 years of experience credit. If you have taught for 20 years, you will still start here as having 7 years of experience. In my district, those 7 years of experience MUST come from public school experience (or public school charter) -- it cannot come from private school, or part-time teaching. I started teaching one year in mid September, and they disallowed that entire year of experience because of that.

    In my district here, a Master's degree gives you a $580 supplement -- that's per year!!!!! not per month!!! Yep, they only pay five hundred bucks extra for having a master's degree. Also, your master's has to be in exactly what you teach. So if you are a middle school math teacher with an urban education master's, you wouldn't get master's pay. Your master's would have to be in math.

    Also, compared to other states I've worked in, the work day is much longer. In public schools it is 8 or 8 and 1/2 hours, and in many charter schools (which are public schools here) the average work day is 9 hours long. Many of the charter schools here do not offer duty free lunch, so you have to eat your lunch while supervising kids in the lunch room in many places.

    In Florida, it is also required, if you are an elementary school teacher, you must be ESOL certified. That requires 5 additional classes, that you must complete within your first 5 years here. Many districts will pay for these classes, but you still have to take 5 college classes on your own time, do the work, and pass the tests. Also, if you teach English in middle or high school, or are a classroom teacher in Elementary, you must also obtain your an additional credential, yes, another 5 classes within your first 5 years.

    There is a huge teacher shortage here, and a huge sub shortage. In my district, they have lowered the requirements for subs -- they only have to be 18 years old and have a high school diploma or equivalent!!! Subs in high school can actually be younger than some of the students! And 90% of the time when a teacher is out, no sub can be found, so their students are simply split into other teachers classes. So if your colleague is out sick, every teacher on your grade level will have an extra 5-8 students in their class for the day.

    Last, if you are an elementary school teacher, in many districts, you are not able to teach the way you want. They use a lot of scripted curriculums here -- which means you must read, word-for-word, from a teaching script. At my school, you are not allowed to vary from the script, or add anything to it. Also, every single teacher in a certain grade, must be use the exact same pacing guide -- they expect every teacher to be on the same page of the same text at exactly the same time! My particular school, we had to follow a schedule for each subject to the minute! For math, you had 4 minutes to do the "productive struggle," 7 minutes for the guided lesson, 5 minutes for the guided practice, 10 minutes for the independent practice, 6 minutes to meet as a group and "debrief"... and you had to wear a timer to make sure you didn't go over. If you were supposed to start math at 1:15pm, and they came in and you were still finishing writing, you would receive a warning. If it happened again, it would mean a negative evaluation. They even selected the read aloud books we had to use -- every single class in your grade level had to be reading the exact same read aloud. (And they liked to do "excerpts" from them, so you rarely got to actually finish a read aloud, which was frustrating.)

    There is no tenure in Florida. Every single year that you teach, you are an "at-will" employee. You have to sign a contract, and if you break it they can hold your teaching license for breach-of-contract, but they can let you go, and are not even required to tell you why.

    Many schools here also have "mandatory extra hours." Schools that are struggling (which is most of them) often require teachers to attend a faculty meeting for an hour every single week after school, and require that you be available on certain days after school for mandatory tutoring. Yes, you do get paid for that at an hourly rate, but it isn't optional. At least 2 days a week, we have to stay until at least 5pm, which can be a struggle since we had to be at school at 7am. It meant making extra day care arrangements for your own kids, and of course, there was an expense to that as well (not to mention that it greatly reduces family time.) I looked at working for a very nice charter school nearby, and the work day there was 9 hours long, Monday through Friday, no duty-free lunch, planning time only 2 days per week, and MANDATORY tutoring after school two days per week. (You did get paid for the mandatory tutoring after school.) I didn't take it because I knew that meant that 3 days a week, I'd be working from 7am to 6pm, without so much as a lunch break!

    Teacher Certification Reciprocity here is very easy from most states, and jobs are plentiful, and having read this, I think you can see why. It's easy to get a job here over the phone from long distance, but the pay and working conditions are terrible.

    I had a master's degree and 19 years of teaching experience, and my starting pay in Florida was less than $45,000. I should also add that the cost of living here is very high. My home here cost more than twice what my former home in North Carolina cost. While there is no state tax here, if you are a home owner, you have to "homestead" -- which means be a Florida resident for a period of time (almost 2 years) before you are entitled to "homesteaded taxes" Until you get homesteaded, you pay a much higher tax rate.

    Florida is a wonderful (albeit expensive) place to live, but, in my opinion, it is a terrible place to teach.
     
  4. RainStorm

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    Jan 30, 2021

    Here is a great article that recently came out -- about the HUGE pay increase for new teachers in our part of Florida. 'We’ve had nothing but slaps in the face': Experienced Manatee County teachers feel disrespected by salary increases (msn.com) Unfortunately, this pay increase does not apply to experience teachers, who now make about the same as teachers who have 10-20 years in the district. And that huge pay increase that now makes our county the highest paying for new teachers in the state??? It's $51,630.

    I know that last year (before Covid) we were supposed to have a class maximum of 18 students in a 2nd grade class. I started out with 28 students (and no aid.) They said 2 months in they would try to hire 3 more 2nd grade teachers, and re-split the classes, but it they couldn't find anyone licensed to even apply, so we finished at 30+ students in each class. They would send random, part-time subs in to "help" but it wasn't consistent or really even helpful.

    According to our state governor, he is trying to "raise the minimum K-12 teacher salary to the goal of getting the average minimum salary statewide to be $47,500.” If that is what they hope to raise it to, do you realize how low it has to be right now? Source: DeSantis Urged to Consider Experience in Teacher Pay Plan (baynews9.com)

    And according to "Indeed," here is the hourly equivalent for full-time teachers in Florida:
    Years of experience Per hour
    Less than 1 year $12.73
    1 to 2 years $12.75
    3 to 5 years no data
    6 to 9 years $14.87
    More than 10 years $17.08
    Now, I honestly think these rates are way lower than they actually are because they include non-certified "teachers" -- I think it is more like $25-$28 per hour.
     
  5. rpan

    rpan Cohort

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    Jan 30, 2021

    Rain,
    Thanks for the candour in the teaching conditions in Florida. I could not imagine teaching under those conditions. I tip my hat to all teachers but especially those who teach in tough conditions. Teaching is hard enough in the best of times but when the system itself does not support you, it makes things twice as awful.
     
  6. Acamp

    Acamp Companion

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    Jan 31, 2021

    Good afternoon Rainstorm,
    To begin, a very big and much appreciated THANK YOU for your very detailed response! That was exactly what I was looking for in regards to details. Thank you for your time in writing all of that!

    I just had a few follow-up questions if you don't mind answering. To begin, I was looking to hopefully relocate to the Sarasota County area (Venice, North Port, Sarasota). I am not sure if their pay is the same in regards to what you wrote above, but since my family is in Sarasota County we would move down there.

    Also, to give more details, besides wanting to relocate and Florida doesn't recognize those).

    2) For Sarasota County, how many years would it take to achieve the TOP pay (without the master's degree) and how much would that top pay be? $58,000 or around there? From what I researched, it looks like it would top off at $58,000 but I do hope I read that wrong.

    3) Do you think I would be more able to find a teaching job more in the middle school math content or ESL content?

    4) For Florida, between private, charter, and public school settings, is public school the best environment in regards to hours, duties that you mentioned, pay, and more freedom to teach? Or are all 3 the same for the most for the most part?

    5) I know that you said teachers are in demand, but are administrators also in demand? If so, do you know the starting salary for an assistant principal at the first step in Florida in general or specifically Sarasota County?

    Sorry for the novel. Look forward to your response if you have time. Thank you in advance!
     
  7. RainStorm

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    Jan 31, 2021

    Okay, I am very familiar with the area where you want to teach. First things first -- Sarasota County is one of the best paying districts in this area, only exceeded by Hillsborough County (Tampa). It is incredibly hard to get a job in Sarasota County because they pay better. There is a lot of competition.

    Right next door to Sarasota County is Manatee County. You do NOT want to teach there. It is insanely easy to get a job in Manatee (I got 18 job offers from Manatee County OVER THE PHONE!!! I'd never even been there yet.) The pay is horrible (they will start you at around $45,000, and the conditions I described above are from my experience in Manatee. Avoid at all costs!

    In Sarasota, they start at $47,500 for certified teachers with a Master's. ($5,000 extra for the masters.) In addition to the $47,500, in Sarasota, you would receive ½% above the initial salary for each year of verifiable experience in an accredited public Pre-K-12 or Florida charter public school (not to exceed 7 1/2%)

    So that means the most you would make in Sarasota, certified and with a bachelors degree is $51,062.50.

    I can tell you more in a bit -- I've got to run right now, but I will give more details later.
     
  8. Acamp

    Acamp Companion

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    Jan 31, 2021

    Thanks for the reply - can't wait to hear the rest!
     
  9. RainStorm

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    Okay, I'm back. I focused my information on middle school math. (Everyone here basically is ESOL certified -- it is state law for classroom teachers.)

    Sarasota pays the better than most and has the best schools and best working conditions. However, there is one nearby county that actually will pay you for your years of experience, up to 23 years of experience! That is Hillsborough County (that's where Tampa is) and it is about about an hour away from Sarasota.

    I was offered a job in Hillsborough, but I didn't take it simply because the school was 89% Hispanic, and I don't speak a word of Spanish! I didn't think I could be effective there. Everyone here has to be ESOL certified, but being bilingual English/Spanish is a huge asset here.

    For new hires, with no experience, they start you at $38,522.88 (that's for 198 teaching days, 8 hours per day.) With 10 years of experience, you'd start out around $45,000. If you have 25 years of public school experience, they'd start you out at about $55,000. They will pay for up to 28 years of experience, and that would be $65,000.

    The bad news? The chart maxes out at $68,000 after you've worked for the district for 23 years (not 23 years experience -- 23 years at that county.)

    And just in case you are wondering, there are lots of charter schools here, but they all pay less than the public schools, and they don't have as good of benefits either. You do get more freedom in how you teach your class at Charter schools, but many of them, you pay so much more towards your health care, and they don't even let you participate in retirement plans until after you've worked there for one school year.
    ----------

    I don't know where you would be moving from, but teacher's pay here is very low, and the hours are very long. Cost of living is pretty high here too.

    If you live in Sarasota, for a basic 3 bedroom, 2 bath house in a decent (but not fancy) area will be $300,000 to around $494,000. Rent on a 2 bedroom apartment would be about $1,800-$2,200 (again, basic, not waterfront or fancy.) That is a lot on a teacher's salary.

    But a lot of people live in Manatee or Hillsborough County, or some of the surrounding areas, where you can get a nice 3 bedroom, 2 bath for around $250,000. That's the low price in my neighborhood to buy a small 3bed/2bath house. To rent the same around here would run about $1,700 to $2,000 per month.

    So if you paid $1,700 per month for rent, that would be $20,400 per year on a $40,000 per year salary. Unless you have a spouse who also earns a good income, I don't think that would be doable. But if you had a second full-time income, it could be done.

    Of course, if you already have a house, and can sell it to buy here, it would be much more affordable.

    The weather is very nice here, and there is lots to do (once the pandemic passes.) It's all a matter of affording it.

    When I moved here, I had to take a big pay cut. The house I bought here cost twice as much as the house I owned in another state (though they were the same size), and the houses here are very close together -- in my old state I had lots of land, and my neighbors were not close by. It's all a give-and-trade.

    I hope that info helps you.
     
  10. RainStorm

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    I thought of something you might want to look into. I have no idea what they pay (and they don't publish or list their salary scale) but there is an elite sports training academy (boarding school) in Bradenton (which is right next to Sarasota -- very close) for middle and high school. They don't have any current teaching jobs listed, but that doesn't mean they won't for the next school year. I would imagine a middle school math teacher would be very much in demand. I never applied there, because I am physically disabled, and part of the job requirements are that you have to be able to move around campus including across turf (and I can't walk on grass) so it wasn't an option for me.

    I have a friend from North Carolina whose son is an elite athlete and attends/boards there, so I know what student tuition is -- it is about $80,000 per year, including room & board, school, and sports training (yes, they are very wealthy people -- I taught their children at a private school where I used to work for about 10 years.)

    It might be worth looking into. Careers | IMG Academy
     
  11. Acamp

    Acamp Companion

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    Feb 1, 2021

    You are a wealth of information - thank you! History teacher? I am curious what you teach now haha.

    I went to that website and checked out the job portal but unfortunately there aren't any middle school teaching positions posted yet. Maybe they will post in March for the next school year. But wow - $80,000 for tuition and room and board? I can't even fathom that amount of money!!

    I used some of your research skills and looked up the average salary for that Academy. From what I googled, it seems like on average they only make around $43k a year. If that's true, that is a shame with charging students $80K for one student and then pay the teachers half that. I just don't understand how they expect teachers to survive on one-income in Florida and live a modest lifestlye in a basic home in a descent area, you know?

    Also, are there any instances at all that one can get hired to be an admin in Florida without the certificate but working towards it? For example, in NJ you can get the certificate of eligibility to teach special education by just applying which will allow you to accept emplyoment and then you have to complete 21 credits within 3-5 years while you are employed. In Florida, do they have anything like that for admin roles?

    Thanks again!
     
  12. RainStorm

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    From what I can find, you have to be fully qualified prior to even applying for an admin job. Remember, there is tons of competition from others who are already fully qualified, so they'd have no reason to even consider someone who wasn't.

    When everyone who teaches makes such low income, the only way to get ahead is to move up to admin, so there are more fully qualified people wanting admin jobs than there are actual admin jobs.

    The truth is you can't afford to live here on a single income teacher's salary (unless you perhaps are willing to have a bunch of roommates, drive an old car, have a 2nd job, and live very frugally.) I took a huge pay cut to move here. But I already owned a house free-and-clear, owned my car with no payments, and had substantial savings tucked away, or I couldn't have done it.

    Let's be real -- when the going rate for a certified teacher, with a Master's degree and almost 20 years of experience is $46,000, while the cost of living is very high, you can already read the writing on the wall. And to add to it, there are not a lot of high-paying jobs in this part of Florida available, no matter what. Hospitality jobs (which are hourly and sometimes seasonal), and sales (requiring cold calls, and most of the income is based on sales figures and commissions) are the norm here.
     
  13. RainStorm

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    I've shown you what teachers make here. Teaching jobs here are incredibly east to get, because they pay around $45,000 for certified, experienced teachers.

    "Regular" (non-teaching jobs) are just as low paying.

    Here are the current full-time jobs available in the County of Sarasota (and yes, about half of their full-time jobs are hourly instead of salaried.) I added in the starting pay. Then I listed the jobs and pay for the current professional, full-time jobs in County of Manatee.
    sarasota 1_Page_1.jpg
    sarasota 1_Page_2.jpg
    manatee 2_Page_1.jpg manatee 2_Page_2.jpg

    As you can see, most of the jobs available are what we'd call "skilled and technical jobs." The administrative jobs are typically filled from within by current employees being promoted.

    Best wishes in deciding what to do.
     

    Attached Files:

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  14. Acamp

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    Feb 14, 2021

    Good morning!
    It has been a few weeks so I figured I would ask you another question =)
    I am currently pursuing my principal certification in NJ. Once I earn my principal cert, do you know if Florida would accept it through reciprocity? I tried searching online but there aren't any clear answers.

    As always, thank YOU for being so informative and helpful. I really do appreciate it.
     
  15. RainStorm

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    No, there aren't clear answers. Everything I read requires that you obtain your certification and experience here in Florida, but it doesn't specifically address reciprocity for adminstrators.

    This is tricky to answer. The Florida DOE won't speak to you directly (you just get an automated phone service, and it they tell you it may take months for them to respond -- and it sometimes does.) The best way to find out is to just go ahead and apply, and they will send you an email with any deficiencies you may have, but in your case, you don't already have the leadership certification. Also, between now and when you get that certification in another state, the Florida rules could completely change. They are constantly adding more requirements here, so you just never know.

    It would be completely different if you had 10 or so years as a principal in another state, but you have no experience as a principal or assistant principal.

    I know that to be eligible for the Asst. Principal pool in local districts, you have to have more than just the Leadership certification -- you also have to have at least 3 years experience in a Florida district.

    As competitive as the market is here for principals, not having Florida experience would be a huge negative that could potentially keep you from even getting an interview for the pool, and you can't get an interview for a leadership job unless you are accepted into the pool. I mean, if they have 120 applicants for an assistant principal job, and 119 of them have experience in the Florida school system, with 3+ years of Florida evaluations, and direct knowledge of how things work here in Florida, and then you are in that pile, I really can't imagine why you would even get selected for the leadership pool, much less for an interview.

    Once you get an interview from the pool, you may have a chance, but remember, it is staff at Human Resources that do the initial screening, and without a background of successful experience for several years someplace in Florida, and without any experience in ed leadership in Florida, I can't imagine you'd get past the screening process. I'm just being honest here.

    Getting a teaching job is easy here, but getting an admin job is really hard -- because almost every teacher here who wants more salary will try for a leadership job, and all of those people, with experience in the Florida system, will be considered before you.

    If it were me, I think I'd get my teaching certification through reciprocity, teach (at really low wages) for 3-5 years, and while doing that, get my leadership certificate right here in Florida through a structured program. You'd have a much better chance to get a job as an assistant principal that way.

    Unless you have really strong connections in a school district here, I simply can't imagine any district even giving an interview to someone from out-of-state for a principal or asst. principal job. You wouldn't have the experience with Florida state rules and regulations to even get an interview. If you can manage to teach (at around $45,000 per year) for 3-5 years, and have the money to pay for the classes and certification program (and can dedicate all the after-hours time to do that) then you would have a much better chance.

    I wish I could give you better news.

    --------

    Here is part of the job description for a Principal in Sarasota County.
    QUALIFICATIONS: (1) Master’s Degree from an accredited educational institution.
    (2) Florida certificate in Administration and Supervision or Educational Leadership.
    (3) Minimum of five (5) years experience in education.
    (4) Minimum of three (3) years experience as a school administrator.
    (5) Must qualify for Administrative Pool prior to applying KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS AND

    ABILITIES: Ability to prepare and manage the school’s budget and allocated resources. Ability to read, interpret and enforce State Board of Education rules, Code of Conduct, School Board policies and appropriate state and federal statutes. Ability to implement and enforce the Collective Bargaining Agreement. Skills in personnel management and supervision. Knowledge of current educational trends and research. Ability to use public speaking skills, group dynamics and problem-solving skills.

    ------
    Here is the one for Asst Principal in Sarasota County.
    QUALIFICATIONS: (1) Master’s Degree from an accredited educational institution. (2) Certification in Educational Leadership, School Principal, Professional School Principal or Administration and Supervision. (3) Minimum of three (3) years successful classroom teaching experience. High School Administrative experience preferred. KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS AND ABILITIES: Knowledge of laws, regulations and policies governing education in state and county. Knowledge of curriculum and instructional programs and practices for appropriate level. Skill to work with people in an effective manner. Knowledge of scheduling and supervision. Ability to communicate effectively, both orally and in writing. Ability to plan, organize and prioritize. Ability to use data in the decision-making process. Ability to use technology resources effectively.
    ------
    One thing you need to know -- in Florida, Assistant Principals are in charge of IEP compliance, meaning they spend a great deal of time in IEP meetings, resolving IEP issues, etc -- so having an understanding of the legal requirements of IEPs in Florida is essential.
    ---------------

    This is from the Florida Department of Education site:

    6A-4.083
    School Principal--Administrative Class.
    To be eligible to receive certification as a school principal, an individual shall satisfy each of the following requirements:

    (1) Hold a valid professional certificate covering educational leadership, administration, or administration and supervision.

    (2) Document successful performance of the duties of the school principalship. These duties shall be performed in a Department of Education approved district school principal certification program pursuant to Rule 6A-5.081, F.A.C., designed and implemented consistent with the principal leadership standards approved by the State Board of Education. In addition, these duties shall:

    (a) Be performed as a full-time employee in a Florida public school in a leadership position through which the candidate can fully demonstrate the competencies associated with the Florida Principal Leadership Standards.

    (b) Be a formally planned professional development program designed and implemented to prepare the individual to effectively perform as a school principal.

    (c) Be comprehensive of all the duties of the school principalship.

    (d) Be performed under the direct supervision of a currently practicing school principal or district manager who has been approved by the district school board to serve as the supervising principal or manager for this program.

    (3) Demonstrate successful performance of the competencies of the school principalship standards which shall be documented by the Florida district school superintendent based on a performance appraisal system approved by the district school board and the Department pursuant to Rule 6A-5.081, F.A.C.

    (4) An individual who holds a valid Florida Educator’s Certificate covering administration or administration and supervision issued prior to July 1, 1986 and served as a school principal prior to July 1, 1986 for not less than one (1) school year may apply for certification as a school principal under the provisions of Rule 6A-4.0085, F.A.C.

    Specific Authority 1001.02, 1012.55, 1012.56 FS. Law Implemented 1001.02, 1012.55, 1012.56 FS. History–New 7-1-86, Formerly 6A-4.083, Amended 7-1-86, 10-31-88, 7-1-07, 11-26-08.


    Here are the requirements for Educational Leadership (IE Assistant Principal) in Florida

    6A-4.082
    Specialization Requirements for Certification in Educational Leadership--Administrative Class.
    (1) A master’s or higher degree awarded by an acceptable institution as defined in Rule 6A-4.003, F.A.C.

    (2) Successful completion of the Florida Educational Leadership Core Curriculum.

    (a) The Educational Leadership core curriculum consists of the following principal leadership standard areas:

    1. Instructional leadership,
    2. Managing the learning environment,
    3. Learning, accountability, and assessment,
    4. Decision making strategies,
    5. Technology,
    6. Human resource development,
    7. Ethical leadership,
    8. Vision,
    9. Community and stakeholder partnerships, and
    10. Diversity.
    (b) Documentation of successful completion of the Florida Educational Leadership Core Curriculum shall be by one (1) of the following plans:

    1. Successful completion of a Department of Education approved Florida preservice program in educational leadership offered by an acceptable institution as defined in subsection 6A-4.003(1), F.A.C. A newly-created state institution that meets approval requirements described in Rule 6A-4.003, F.A.C., shall be considered as having met the accreditation requirement.
    2. A graduate degree major in educational administration, administration and supervision or educational leadership awarded by an acceptable institution as defined in Rule 6A-4.003, F.A.C.
    3. A graduate degree with a major in a subject other than educational administration, administration and supervision or educational leadership, and successful completion of a Department of Education approved modified Florida program in educational leadership offered by an acceptable institution as defined in subsection 6A-4.003(1), F.A.C. A newly-created state institution that meets approval requirements described in Rule 6A-4.003, F.A.C., shall be considered as having met the accreditation requirement.
    4. A graduate degree with a major in a subject other than educational administration, administration and supervision, or educational leadership awarded by an acceptable institution as defined in Rule 6A-4.003, F.A.C., and thirty (30) semester hours of graduate credit which includes credit in each of the principal leadership standard areas specified in paragraph (2)(a) of this rule and an internship or a course with associated field experience in educational leadership.
    5. Successful completion of an Educational Leadership training program approved by the Department of Education and offered by a Florida public school district.
    Specific Authority 1001.02, 1012.55, 1012.56 FS. Law Implemented 1001.02, 1012.55, 1012.56 FS. History–New 7-1-86, Formerly 6A-4.082, Amended 10-31-88, 9-12-89, 7-17-00, 7-1-07.
     
  16. Acamp

    Acamp Companion

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    Apr 18, 2021

    Good morning!
    Hope you are well last speaking to you. So I took your advice, applied for the IMG ACADEMY, and actually had a remote interview last week. Unfortunately, they would only pay less than $60,000 so I couldn’t accept the offer compared to what I am being paid now. The sad thing is that their tuition is around $80k per student and yet they can’t even pay their teachers a descent wave? Maybe it’s greed or maybe it’s overhead and facility cost. Either way, I was disappointed but it wasn’t meant to be.

    I wish I could teach in Florida for 3-5 years as you mentioned but I couldn’t be able to find a place and support my family on that income. Since I have 16 years in NJ with a masters, I am one step away from the top of the scale making a little more than $90,000. On top of that, I was able to find a VERY inexpensive townhouse (for NJ cost standards) and I wouldn’t be able to find anything comparable for that price in FL.

    So besides tech and specific skilled type of jobs, there aren’t that many options to make my current salary in Florida if I were to change careers, correct?

    As always, thank YOU for all of your detailed posts!

     

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