Fish Fridays

Discussion in 'Debate & Marathon Threads Archive' started by JustMe, Apr 3, 2012.

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Does your school serve fish (or other acceptable options) on Fridays during Lent?

  1. Yes, fish/non-meat is an option.

    26 vote(s)
    59.1%
  2. No, fish/non-meat options are not available.

    10 vote(s)
    22.7%
  3. Other. (Please elaborate.)

    8 vote(s)
    18.2%
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  1. callmebob

    callmebob Enthusiast

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    Maybe if I paid attention to what the students ate each day. I really have no idea.

    As an extra, I do believe the students have a couple different options each day. They do not have to choose the main food item that quite often is some form of meat.
    I will also say, as a school I would not concern myself with or cater to students who are vegan or vegetarian.
     
  2. orangetea

    orangetea Connoisseur

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    Why not?
     
  3. silverspoon65

    silverspoon65 Enthusiast

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    Isn't PBJ available to kids every day? Or maybe not because of allergies?

    When I was in school, we had grilled cheese or fish sandwich rotating every Friday of Lent, and there were hardly any Catholics in my school. I was never a practicing Catholic, but my dad was raised Catholic and my mom's mom was as well, so we still retained a lot of the traditions. But we only didn't eat meat on Good Friday, but we never had school then so it wasn't an issue. We always dyed Easter eggs that day and then ate them for dinner.
     
  4. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    Curious as well...
     
  5. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    Our school is bad about having options. It's the menu offering or nothing as far as I know. Not even salads are available.
     
  6. bison

    bison Habitué

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    The vegetarian options here seem to generally be things like mac n cheese, pasta, pb&j, salad, etc. Not exactly specialty foods, just another option for everyone. Why wouldn't you want to offer that?

    I do wish all of their options were a little more healthy, no matter when.
     
  7. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    I was raised Baptist and Methodist (baptized Methodist) and we got palm leaves for our doors, went meatless on Friday...the whole of it all. :)
     
  8. orangetea

    orangetea Connoisseur

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    Exactly. There are many people that are vegetarian, so they should be given options. We have pasta, sandwiches, pizza, and veggie burgers for vegetarians. Many non-vegetarian students eat these as well.
    I can't understand why someone would find it too difficult to accommodate students who are vegetarian. It makes absolutely no sense at all. It's pretty horrible for vegetarian students have no options when they enter the cafeteria.
    You could argue that they could bring their own food from home, but some parents don't want to make lunch. Some don't have time. Some kids are vegetarian and on free or reduced lunch, which means that they need to eat at school.
    Not having vegetarian options is just unfair to those students.
     
  9. callmebob

    callmebob Enthusiast

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    Having salad and fruit options is fine. Even having sides that don't have meat is just fine as well. PB&J, grilled cheese, perfectly acceptable lunch staples. But to go out of your way to make sure that there is a main dish alternate that is vegetarian or vegan is not necessary. PB&J, cheese sandwich, salad bar, those are everyday types of options, but there does not need to be a different main item choice everyday that fills a vegan or vegetarian void.
     
  10. KinderCowgirl

    KinderCowgirl Phenom

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    I still don't think you answered the question of why you feel that is not necessary.

    We don't have those options every day. There are 2 choices-often it's foods like chicken fingers or hot dogs.

    I'm a vegetarian myself and when we get a surprise lunch provided for the staff on pd days, it's hard to be left out-people are asking you why you aren't eating. And I'm an adult and can deal with it more easily. I guess I just don't understand when you have kids with religious restrictions or dietary ones, you wouldn't create an option for that. If they did veggie burgers there are certainly non-vegetarian kids who would get them too.
     
  11. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

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    :yeahthat: :thumb:


    Cheese sandwiches are not vegan. So, as a vegan, I would be out of luck if that's the only option provided. And, seriously, I'm so tired people suggesting salads. I'm so sick and tired of salads. I mean, I make a mean salad, but the ones in the cafeterias are pretty sad and pathetic.

    I don't get why there needs to be an issue about providing a healthy alternative that doesn't include meat or dairy.

    I'm German. I grew up eating meat and cheese.

    I found, though, that when I gave these things up, my meals became even more yummy because I now had to think outside of the box. No more typical pizza and hamburger and burritos. I make INCREDIBLE food. I love cooking now. I love baking, too. I have people who are meat and dairy eaters saying how yummy my food is. It's all about being creative and being a good cook.

    But I digress.

    We have children from all sorts of backgrounds with different dietary needs. Also, we have many kids who are overwieght. We really need to take a look at what we are serving in our cafeterias.

    Hmmmm, maybe this is my calling.....
     
  12. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    Apr 4, 2012

    I know exactly what you mean! They either look at you like you have two heads or kindly try to find things you can eat...but none will work, and I don't expect them to know the specifics anyhow. I'm an adult so I take care of myself and make due with this or that, but children aren't in the same position.
     
  13. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    New orders are taken at the start of each marking period...the PTO creates an order form listing the choices for each day...so a kid's family can order penne vodka for every Monday of the marking period, a bagel with cream cheese for every Wednesday, etc...parents pay up front for the entire marking period.
     
  14. orangetea

    orangetea Connoisseur

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    I personally believe it's important to have a few options for vegetarian and vegan kids. That doesn't mean have an alternative to the hot lunch everyday. It means that sometimes the hot lunch can be vegetarian. Or sometimes, if the meat is separate, vegetarian students can just take the vegetarian part. (Ex. Pasta with meatballs)
    That would mean that they wouldn't have to live on salads and cheese sandwiches everyday. (Speaking of, the grilled cheese in my school is EXTREMELY unhealthy. I think they dip the whole thing in butter.)
     
  15. mom2ohc

    mom2ohc Habitué

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    just curious..... what about students who qualify for free lunch? they still get free lunch?
     
  16. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    I know we send the income eligibility forms home...we have hardly any families who would qualify as low income...
     
  17. mom2ohc

    mom2ohc Habitué

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    We have many, so that is why I was curious. But I wonder, I mean even if they do qualify, would you get federal money for their lunches? That is how it works right? I am not even sure.
     
  18. 3Sons

    3Sons Enthusiast

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    My kids go to a very similar district, so I'm aware of a couple of downsides of this. First, the preorder period tends to be very short and it's easy to miss. You can't pick up mid-month (for my district, it's month-to-month).

    As far as cost, it's not too bad. Parents can also decide to make lunch on some days of the week -- IIRC, my kids eat lunch 2 or 3 times a week from the school and other days bring lunch. DW makes a much more filling and healthy lunch than they sell (even though they're not entirely unhealthy, I can't really consider a bagel with cream cheese a real meal).
     
  19. KinderCowgirl

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    Doesn't sound too healthy to me either,surprises me as a choice for a kid's lunch-although that is probably a vegetarian choice. ;)
     
  20. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    I know...that surprised me, too!
     
  21. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Correction...it's penne in red sauce.:eek::blush:
     
  22. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    :haha:
     
  23. callmebob

    callmebob Enthusiast

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    I have no problem with healthy choices in the cafeteria. I think school cafeteria food should get a significant overhaul. I do not think though that there needs to be specific choices that are deemed vegetarian, and especially not vegan. Now if the meal on a specific day happens to not have a meat as the protein, that is fine as long as it is a balanced meal. But, a conscience effort to make sure there are those choices on a daily basis beyond the everyday extra choices, no.
     
  24. orangetea

    orangetea Connoisseur

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    So it's not a problem if a vegetarian child cannot find something filling and healthy to eat?
     
  25. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Given the quality of most school food these days, I'd argue that most students, vegetarian or not, wouldn't be able to find something filling and healthy at school.

    The solution: bring your own lunch.
     
  26. Momzoid

    Momzoid Companion

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    I think this really sums it all up!:thumb:
     
  27. orangetea

    orangetea Connoisseur

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    I was thinking more of students who can't bring their own lunch. What about vegetarian students that are on free or reduced price lunch?

    I personally don't see why it's an issue to make sure that there is one decent vegetarian meal everyday. Other students could eat this as well. But that's just my opinion. I understand that all schools feel differently about this.
     
  28. callmebob

    callmebob Enthusiast

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    As I said, they can either bring their lunch or eat the peanut butter and jelly. Nothing wrong with PBandJ
     
  29. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

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    Unless you are allergic to peanut butter... Students who qualify for free lunch are often unable to bring food from home for lunch. That's why the qualify for free lunch. So, poor people don't have the same rights to religious practice as others do? Or what if they have a note from their doctor?

    The public school I went to had awesome vegetarian options. We had a full vegetarian hot bar each day, as well as a salad bar, and we always had hummus, cottage cheese, or peanut butter on the sandwich bar. Our vegetarian food was cooked in vegetable-based oils, so it would be possible to eat vegan there. It was a residential school, so this was for three meals a day. When students asked, kosher and halal food would be provided. During Ramadan, they served a meal in the middle of the night for Muslim students who were fasting during the day. Seafood on Friday during Lent was a big deal, and it was always delicious! It's all about being culturally sensitive and realizing that different people have different dietary needs.
     
  30. orangetea

    orangetea Connoisseur

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    Exactly. Again, what is wrong with making an effort to provide a variety of vegetarian food food? That could simply be a sandwich station with several vegetarian options a day. That could be making the hot lunch vegetarian twice a week or offering veggie burgers with hamburgers.
     
  31. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    It comes down to $$$$.
     
  32. callmebob

    callmebob Enthusiast

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    As czacza said, Money as well as not catering to every single person. It is not a restaurant where you are trying to get every person to come in and enjoy your food. The purpose of the school is to learn. The cafeteria is there to provide a meal.
    As for someone commenting on poor people who don't have the option to bring lunch, I'm sorry, but when you are that poor should you really be that picky about the foods you eat (vegetarian vs. meat)?

    The purpose of the school is to teach, not cater to everyones dietary desires. Needs are one thing. Someone is allergic to a certain food, you make sure they have something else. But if they choose to refrain from all meats, thats a choice that shouldn't have to be catered to.
     
  33. MissCeliaB

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    It's not about being a picky eater, it's about religious requirements to eat a certain way. To me, that qualifies as a need. It's not as simple as "I don't like pizza, so I need a vegetarian meal." It's, "My religion forbids me to eat beef, so I can't eat this hamburger. Could I have a veggie burger instead?"
     
  34. orangetea

    orangetea Connoisseur

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    Some people don't eat meat for religious reasons. I don't eat meat for religious reasons and because I hate the idea of killing animals . If I were poor, I would rather not compromise my beliefs. When God tells me that I shouldn't eat meat, then no, I won't eat it no matter what. I wasn't going to respond to this anymore, but there are many reasons that people want to eat vegetarian food.
     
  35. callmebob

    callmebob Enthusiast

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    I understand that part of this conversation has been directed at Lent and some dietary restrictions during it. That makes sense. I also still stand by the idea that if there are certain days a child can't eat certain foods, then the parents need to make sure they have something with them that they can eat.

    As for other reasons people choose not to eat meat, that is your choice then, and the schools should not have to worry about every individuals dietary choices. Academic needs is one thing, dietary choices is another.

    All of this talk is also making me hungry, need to go make some breakfast.
     
  36. JustMe

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    The entire thread was started because of Lent, actually.

    So, you believe that during Lent it makes sense for schools to provide non-meat alternatives? If so, why is that sensible but it's not to provide for religious restrictions at other times in the year or even every day? Because it's part of your religion? Just not sure I understand what you are saying here so I wanted to ask for clarification. I could easily be misunderstanding, so my apologies if that's the case.

    And, for the record, not all peanut butter is vegetarian or vegan. Many use mono-diglycerides which can come from animal fat. Animal died to provide for you = non vegetarian.
     
  37. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    Yes, and... I think dairy lobbyists and I am sure meat groups also play a huge role.
     
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