First Year Teacher with Unsat rating mid year

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by redrose176, Dec 26, 2017.

  1. redrose176

    redrose176 Rookie

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2017
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    3

    Dec 26, 2017

    I could really use some advice. Let me give some quick background. I have four kids, married and in my mid 40's. I subbed at my kids elementary school for five years and absolutely loved it. I was the most requested substitute. I am very book smart, graduated with honors in college, received my Masters Degree in Elementary Education: Curriculum and Instruction. I have passed all the certification tests. The principal at my children's elementary school would never give me an interview or hire me. After I finished my Masters Degree, I went searching elsewhere.
    I ended up finding a job out of area. It is an hour to work and often two hours home. It has taken a huge toll on my family, as I am not there and my house and kids room are in bad shape. I spend so much time focused on work, totally neglecting my home and family.
    I am lucky in the fact that financially I don't need to work and the money is not that great, so losing it would not be that big of a deal.
    I am teaching in a tough area. I subbed at the A school. And am currently at a Title I school where the entire student population receives free lunch. It has been very tough. I have had 15 suspensions this year, my classroom management sucks and I do NOT have eyes in the back of my head. My students are progressing, but not as much as I would like. The job is absolutely horrendous and I hate it. I am not the type to quit and would stay until the end of the year if it wasn't for...
    I have a START teacher who comes in to observe and then rates me. She has had four visits and on this last one, EVERY SINGLE mark was on Developing. Then my principal met with me and gave me an UNSATISFACTORY rating, along with Developing. I had to sign a paper stating that I realize that I am doing poorly. I had every intention of finishing the school year and then quit teaching. But now with an UNSATISFACTORY rating and the rest NEEDS IMPROVEMENT, and another follow up at the end of January. I am wondering would it be better to quit now, or get fired at the end of the year with an UNSATISFACTORY rating.
    Though I love the students and love teaching, I do NOT have eyes in the back of my head. I am really oblivious to my surroundings. I had over 200 applications in at the good district, and had over 20 interviews with out being hired. Now I am thinking if I ever do want to try to teach again, which would be worse? Quitting mid year with Unsat rating or getting fired at the end of the year with an official UNSATISFACTORY rating????
     
  2.  
  3. rpan

    rpan Cohort

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2017
    Messages:
    703
    Likes Received:
    539

    Dec 26, 2017

    There’s a third option that’s a little more long term. You could improve your classroom management. No one has eyes at the back of their head but your classroom management dictates kids behaviour. If classroom management is strong then kids don’t misbehave even when your back is turned. Unfortunately it’s one of those skills that needs to be honed in a classroom and no university course is going to teach you how to manage the classroom, students and their behaviour.
    If you chose either one of those options you stated, then you will probably have the same problem you are now facing in the new school - unless you teach in a school where behaviours aren’t a problem.
    So I suggest sticking it out in your current school and improve your classroom management skills. Negotiate with the P to observe another teacher or have another teacher observe you to give you pointers on what you could do in certain situations. No shame in that at all; at least you acknowledge the shortcoming and try to fix it rather than jump from school to school, which isn’t really a solution. Sorry if this sounds harsh.
     
    Peregrin5, bella84, Zelda~* and 2 others like this.
  4. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Fanatic

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2012
    Messages:
    2,855
    Likes Received:
    623

    Dec 26, 2017

    This.

    As an elementary teacher, you should understand it will never be easy. The expectations on gen ed elementary teachers is downright unreasonable.
     
    jteach89 and bella84 like this.
  5. redrose176

    redrose176 Rookie

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2017
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    3

    Dec 26, 2017

    Thanks for your input. I keep trying to get my kids under control with better classroom management. I have done everything I know what to think of. That is the problem, I don't know how to improve my classroom management skills... I keep reading books, attending trainings, using CHAMPS. I have my rules posted, I have consequences, I use incentives, and yet I receive many negative marks during my observations. And I always get marked down for the student's behavior. For example, they will hide in corners and they are very sneaky. The worst is during small groups. I have gone over the procedures over and over. But they act like they are doing their work, and are not listening to anything I said. I think I was too lenient and I just don't know how to get them to behave... So I appreciate any tips on getting it to work... Also, why I am starting to believe I may not be cut out to be a teacher. Classroom management is a great skill, I can't seem to learn...
    For example these were some of the last comments from my last observation, I could use specific advice... "-Throughout the observation, the teacher asked the students to “put your eyes on me” 19 times during the observation. -One student was in a large office chair in the corner of the classroom. The student was spinning around in the chair. During the observation, the teacher did not verbally address the student. I noticed the teacher glance in the direction of the student three times during the observation. The student remained in the chair for the entire observation. -Students at the teacher table were observed hitting the gong that is used by the teacher to obtain student attention. The teacher did not address this behavior with the two students. -During the second rotation, a student approached the teacher table. The student was questioning something on his assignment. The teacher asked him to have a seat and not approach the table. The student continued to talk to the teacher. She asked him once again to have a seat and not approach the table."
    Thank you.
     
  6. redrose176

    redrose176 Rookie

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2017
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    3

    Dec 26, 2017

    If I can't get better classroom management skills, then any suggestions what I should do?
     
  7. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Fanatic

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2012
    Messages:
    2,855
    Likes Received:
    623

    Dec 26, 2017

    It sounds like you are jumping around to way too many strategies while failing to hold them accountable. If they screw around in the spinning chair, stick it in the hallway with a take me sign. If student attention isn’t on you, stop and wait them out.
     
  8. rpan

    rpan Cohort

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2017
    Messages:
    703
    Likes Received:
    539

    Dec 26, 2017

    Following through is one of those classroom and behaviour management 101. Start afresh from a Monday, lay down the rules and consequences for not following the rules. When a student steps out of line, assign a consequence. You must follow through.
    When you give an instruction, wait and scan the room to give them time to comply. No use saying Shhhh or Eyes on me 50 times because then it loses its effectiveness. Say it once or twice but firmly, then assign consequences if needed. Praise those who comply quickly to hint to those who aren’t complying.
    Observe other teachers- it’s very helpful.
     
  9. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Phenom

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2014
    Messages:
    4,398
    Likes Received:
    1,304

    Dec 26, 2017

    I agree with this respondent. Consistency is key. Always follow up when a student breaks a rule.
     
  10. Hokiegrad1993

    Hokiegrad1993 Comrade

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2017
    Messages:
    262
    Likes Received:
    98

    Dec 27, 2017

    Don't quit mid year. That could mess up the kid's routine. Do your best talk to your peers and get ideas of what you can do better. Talk to us as well :) Good luck!
     
    Obadiah likes this.
  11. agdamity

    agdamity Fanatic

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2007
    Messages:
    2,719
    Likes Received:
    481

    Dec 27, 2017

    I think a large issue is you didn’t address the misbehavior. Students will misbehave, and as long as you address it and the behavior stops, it won’t show negatively on your evaluation. However, by ignoring the behavior, it shows a lack of management.
     
  12. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Fanatic

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2012
    Messages:
    2,855
    Likes Received:
    623

    Dec 27, 2017

    Agreed. I’ve been told to stop teaching and deal with behavior, even during observation.
     
  13. kpa1b2

    kpa1b2 Aficionado

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2002
    Messages:
    3,274
    Likes Received:
    38

    Dec 27, 2017

    When you return to school after break, review and practice your rules. Take it back to the beginning if you need to. How do they enter the room, get supplies, line up etc. Stop doing small groups until they can handle whole group activities. Slowly reintroduce small goup activities. Maybe only 1 rotation at a time. Good luck.
     
    futureteacher13 and AlwaysAttend like this.
  14. a2z

    a2z Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2010
    Messages:
    6,347
    Likes Received:
    2,231

    Dec 27, 2017

    If this is your real name and picture, I suggest you change your pic and update your user name to something less identifying. It just isn't good internet protocol to have identifying information out there.

    I wanted to PM you but I am unable to do so.
     
    futuremathsprof and AlwaysAttend like this.
  15. Hokiegrad1993

    Hokiegrad1993 Comrade

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2017
    Messages:
    262
    Likes Received:
    98

    Dec 27, 2017

    Thanks.. cannot figure out how to change name but changed the picture.
     
  16. a2z

    a2z Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2010
    Messages:
    6,347
    Likes Received:
    2,231

    Dec 27, 2017

    Contact a moderator. They might be able to help. I'm not sure of an easy way to do so. Maybe you can report your own post and ask a moderator how to get it changed.
     
  17. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

    Joined:
    May 8, 2008
    Messages:
    8,586
    Likes Received:
    1,701

    Dec 27, 2017

    According to a post I found from the site owner, she had tried to create a way to change screen names when the new platform was created, but I was unable to get the hyperlink to work. I'll keep researching this and will get in touch with the poster privately if something comes to light.
     
  18. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Fanatic

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2012
    Messages:
    2,855
    Likes Received:
    623

    Dec 27, 2017

    The poster also only has less than a months worth of posts. It would probably be easier to delete and start over.
     
  19. Obadiah

    Obadiah Groupie

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2015
    Messages:
    1,358
    Likes Received:
    843

    Dec 28, 2017

    I noticed some red flags in the OP's description of the observation and thought sharing them might help. I was surprised that the students misbehaved so flagrantly while a second person was in the room. That is very unusual for elementary students who usually exercise a bit of caution when a different person is present; not that they'll never misbehave--I've had that happen during observations, but the amount and type of misbehavior I found unusual. Why that's a red flag: this shows the extent of the misbehavior that is ingrained within them. Such misbehavior is a learned response to brain stimulation.

    Just last night, I was talking to a professional who's counseled teenagers who experience difficulty in civil obedience. He was describing their typical home situation. In his words, they often had parents who not only never took time to teach them right from wrong but didn't set any such examples, either. Often they experienced more neglect than nurturing.

    Back to my own experience from research and observation, imagine the student's learning environment at home. Their pro-behavior is not a set of socially acceptable traits but rather avoiding stuff that gets on their parents' nerves. Discipline, rather than a teaching procedure, is a breaking point of shouting and screaming. Violent reactions might also occur, or placing the children in another situation so as to "stay out of the parent's hair" is sometimes used. The professional from last night mentioned something else: often there is a lack of "hugging" in such homes.

    I'm not advocating Skinnerian behaviorism in stating this, but these students have been conditioned, when their brain chemicals react one way, they automatically react another. What they need is a redirected response. As mentioned above, consistency is usually more productive than trying to find something that works. I'd be cautious, also, with trying to find "rewards" that work. The key is for the class to learn that to function socially in a group they need to follow specific social protocol; rather than working for rewards they work together for a common goal of a productive classroom. (Some rewards can be fun and add spark to a classroom, but the reward game can explode on a teacher, too--you might want to research Alfie Kohn on this).

    A second red flag is the type of misbehavior. Approaching a desk at a wrong time, spinning in a chair, hitting a gong...student exhibit similar responses to positive learning explorations; (e.g., what will happen if I do this)? So it's not that the students are against learning. They just need redirected towards more positive learning experiences and away from negative actions.

    Not that I'm recommending this next point, but concerning other teachers' observations, it's been my experience that teachers with a rough class will suddenly change their procedures during an observation and this will inhibit noncompliant behavior among the students, at least enough to get a passing grade. I've even heard teachers brag about their sneaky endeavors to avoid a lower observation. Although I'm sure you will learn ideas to improve your classroom decorum, overall, it's not you. You weren't the one misbehaving, it was the students.

    I would recommend taking a lead from Mr. Rogers of Mr. Roger's Neighborhood. I know, that sounds like the antithesis of solutions, but if you can observe his teaching, there are some tips that can be picked up. He was consistent, he set an example of proper social manners and expected his television audience to do likewise (which he taught, often through his songs). He added novelty to his lessons; students' brains learn from novelty. Learning was the purpose of watching his program; the purpose was not shut up, sit up, and listen: but on the other hand, the television audience did attend to his program. Most importantly, he cared about his students (which I'm sure you already excel in that part).

    I need to end abruptly because I'm out of time and need to run. You'll be in my thoughts. I hope things turn around for the better and you end the year very successfully--but whatever, please don't blame yourself. It's the students who are misbehaving according to how they've been taught at home, not you.
     
  20. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

    Joined:
    May 13, 2005
    Messages:
    29,807
    Likes Received:
    1,171

    Dec 28, 2017

    As you start following through, you're going to get more pushback from the students. This is normal, and not about you personally: it takes work to readjust one's expectations. You'll need to stay the course. Even with relatively young students, I would recommend a few things:

    - Know in advance the consequences you intend to (or can) assign. School culture plays some role here, as does student age; I'm sure A to Z members would be happy to help you critique your options for ease of implementation and for naturalness, or the extent to which the consequence relates to the offense.

    - Avoid blaming and shaming. None of us likes having our nose rubbed in our fault. It's possible to state a consequence without pillorying the student who committed the offense. Where practical, don't use "I" language, and be intentional about "you" language, when assigning consequences. That is, it's not "You spun in the chair when I told you not to, Billy. I'm going to restrict you from sitting in the chair"; instead, it's "The chair isn't for spinning. The consequence for spinning the chair is ___." Oh, and make sure your demeanor is calm and friendly.

    Let me recommend searching the site for posts by Loomistrout, a relatively infrequent poster who tends to talk sense about classroom management; a number of the responses to Loomistrout's posts are also insightful.
     
  21. new2teach15

    new2teach15 Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2015
    Messages:
    35
    Likes Received:
    13

    Jan 3, 2018

    I can relate to you. I had a rough first year teaching and wanted to leave mid year, in fact I even posted about it. I stuck it out and now that I am removed from the situation I can look at it with a clear head. My classroom management sucked! I had no idea what I was doing and it showed. I didn’t feel like I had anyone to turn to for advise and I hated every day. I can say that one big thing that will help you is to build relationships with your students. Get to know them. Each lunch with them, find out what they like. If they don’t feel like you care about them, they won’t care about you or any rules you put into place. Ask your principal or others who are excelling to come and model a lesson for you. Go observe others and find out what works for them and why. Let your principal know that you want to be better, it is their job to help you be successful, but you have to do the work. Contact parents and build relationships with them, don’t make promises you can’t keep a d try to handle problems yourself rather than having admin take care of it. I learned that every time I sent a misbehaving student to the office I lost the authority over that student and they knew it. have an age appropriate discussion with your students and let them know you want to have a better classroom culture and what you are going to do to be better and what they can do to be better. Remember that one bad experience at one school doesn’t mean that you should give up. Find a different school, different grade, different team, but don’t give up. It is ultimately your responsibility to set the culture in your classroom. Best of luck to you.
     
    kpa1b2, Obadiah and Secondary Teach like this.
  22. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2014
    Messages:
    11,776
    Likes Received:
    2,921

    Jan 3, 2018

    Nothing comes to any of us without study and research of the problem, recognition of "ourselves" when the discussion turns to the kind of teacher actions that allows the unwanted behavior to get started or continue, and enough time and consistent effort to create a new class understanding of the now functional classroom behavior expectations. I totally agree with the comments that there will be pushback from the students when the consistency becomes the new normal - you must realize that this can be a signal that you are actually making progress. Correcting the misbehavior, though, is only part of the problem. As you extinguish the undesirable behavior, you must introduce an acceptable behavior that you can honestly compliment or reward them for. Otherwise, the students will stumble around and replace the poor behavior with what they think is better, without your guidance and approval, which makes students and teacher unhappy if they choose poorly. This is where you need to lead - don't just "tell" them what you want, but exhibit the desired behavior, and acknowledge the efforts to get to the finished product. Rome wasn't built in a day, and changing bad habits - theirs and yours - will require consistent effort and recognition to the steps leading to the final product. Once you are successful with this, you will be well on your way to mastering classroom management. Best of luck!
     
    MissScrimmage likes this.
  23. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2007
    Messages:
    4,466
    Likes Received:
    1,494

    Jan 4, 2018

    You’ve got another semester to turn things around. The year isn’t over; don’t give up just yet!

    I’d ask the principal for sub coverage so you can observe teachers with strong classroom management. If possible, maybe a person who isn’t an administrator (instructional coach?) can come in to observe you and provide effective, constructive, and immediate feedback.

    Take these next few weeks to get to know your students. What are their likes and dislikes? Have you heard of PAT (Preferred Activity Time)? Here’s a list of some cool activities.

    Don’t give up. Your kids deserve to have the best year ever.
     
  24. Obadiah

    Obadiah Groupie

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2015
    Messages:
    1,358
    Likes Received:
    843

    Jan 4, 2018

    American culture has developed a myth that if one does not experience smooth sailing at first attempt s/he is not cut out for that task. True, sometimes one does start an activity no problem at all, but most of the time, it's through trial, error, hard work, and as Carol Dweck puts it, grit. My grandmother taught me when I was little, "If at first you don't succeed, try, try again." Something I've learned throughout my career is to keep my eyes on my mission and not on the critics.
     
    Backroads, CherryOak and AlwaysAttend like this.
  25. redrose176

    redrose176 Rookie

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2017
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    3

    Jan 7, 2018

    I can't tell you how much I appreciated everything you wrote. For a little bit of an update. This week was the first week back after Winter Break, I made sure I had things in line for the first week. I lost one of my most difficult behavior students, he dropped on the first day back. That immediately took a weight off me. Then I started with my procedures and started hard core. For the most part the day was better.

    As for the rest of the week (only three days), it went amazingly well. The best week I have had this year!! I decided to be more consistent and take away things that were causing issues. For example, I removed all the students items from their desks, put crayon boxes on the bookshelf, moved all their books and classwork to their cubbies. This cuts down on the mis-behavior. I was being observed constantly by instructional coaches and I think it made things worse. I was always on edge, and the students knew this. They are just children and they took advantage of that.

    When I returned, I wanted everyone to know I was serious. I took everything in my classroom that related to me down and took it home. I left only the students stuff up. But if it was something that I had that was cutesy I got rid of it. I decided that I should not be comfortable and I need to stay alert and never let my guard down. The Unsat rating had a very large effect on me. I wanted students to know from the very beginning that the class was for them. And that learning would be enforced. My rules are the rules and I wasn't going to let anyone see my vulnerability again. (It felt like that was a huge weakness, letting everyone know just how insecure I felt.)

    I had a small area in the corner of my classroom that had a little bit of build up of left over paperwork. I didn't see it as a big concern, devoting time to other issues. One part of my Unsat rating was based on the small amount of clutter. I took that away that day. I stayed and got all of my stuff into the closet and now I keep everything in my closet. I do not have a single personal item in my room.

    So, for the most part things were better. However, by Friday afternoon, I was getting more pushback. I was staying consistent with discipline, stopped talking and told students they were wasting their own time. Our days are so jam packed with so much learning, that I never left any free time for the kids (our recess is often about 7 minutes long.) I realized the students were far more eager to be productive, if they knew that the last fifteen minutes of class they could have that extra 15 minutes of "Free Time."

    I know this next month is going to be critical to keep the momentum up. I know it will be easy to want to sit down sometimes, but I am DEFINITELY a fighter. And I have absolutely NO desire to give up. My hubby (and family) continuously say my biggest strength is my tenacity. So every day, I am going to go in with the attitude that not only can I do this, but I WILL do this. I am sure there will be challenges, but after the past few months to have a successful (short) first week back, boosted my confidence and commitment.

    I will be honest, I don't know if I want to continue to teach after this year. It has taken a toll on my family and it might be something that I need to put off until my children don't need me as much as they do now, but I want to end the year on a good note. So, now, or later down the road, I can have the option of teaching open.

    I really appreciate your comments too. We adopted twins out of foster care, they were two years old, spent their life in the system and had visits with this biological mother until the age of 4 years old. One of them still has many, many issues. We later did get pregnant and have two biological children. I am VERY CLOSE to my one of my adopted twins and I feel as though I love them all the same. But it was amazing just how much nature plays a role. Nurture does play an important role, but it CANNOT completely overcome nature. One of my twins continues to face many challenges because of his poor decision solving capabilities, while the other one continues to thrive with his good choices. (Of their entire biological family) the twin who makes good decisions is the ONLY one not to have a prison record.

    So there is only so much we can do. I grew up in Los Angeles, California and was exposed to really tough neighborhoods. I have been living in a really good town with little crime, in fact, I often refer to this town as "Storybook Land" just because of how much easier life is here then where I grew up.

    Thanks again for your comments. (And everyone else's as well.)
     
  26. redrose176

    redrose176 Rookie

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2017
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    3

    Jan 7, 2018

    You are so correct!! It continues to AMAZE me when people say teachers have it easy... No, they do not!!!
     
    AlwaysAttend likes this.
  27. redrose176

    redrose176 Rookie

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2017
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    3

    Jan 7, 2018

    With the new year, that is my focus, I think that was one of my biggest issues is my lack of consistency. I was so overwhelmed, I let too much go before I realized what had happened. But with a tough new stance and a good first week back, I am not going to let my momentum lag.
     
    futuremathsprof likes this.
  28. redrose176

    redrose176 Rookie

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2017
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    3

    Jan 7, 2018

    I feel grateful to have this community. In the end that was my driving force on being better. I think it would be detrimental to the students to have to get a new teacher mid-year. They KNOW that I love and care about each student and I know that makes a difference.
     
    Hokiegrad1993 likes this.
  29. redrose176

    redrose176 Rookie

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2017
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    3

    Jan 7, 2018

    I agree completely. Management is not my strong suit, but that doesn't mean I can't learn. So in order to better myself and continue to grow, I will continue to learn and be consistent.
     
  30. redrose176

    redrose176 Rookie

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2017
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    3

    Jan 7, 2018

    Thank you. I have done JUST THAT. This past week we went back to procedures, and after the weekend, come Monday morning, I am going to hit them with that again!! After a few weeks, or maybe even months, as long as I don't waver, they will learn.
     
  31. redrose176

    redrose176 Rookie

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2017
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    3

    Jan 7, 2018

    Thank you for the advice. I know I have to be more consistent and it is hard, but I am getting there. It's wonderful to be part of such a positive community and get feedback.
     
  32. redrose176

    redrose176 Rookie

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2017
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    3

    Jan 7, 2018

    I know that they haven't been able to really afford a substitute for me to observe, but I got very lucky. The last week of school, one of the teachers I really respect and admire (she and I) were to miss a PBS celebration with the students who did not earn the right to attend. Just watching her for that half hour made me feel as though I was in the presence of a "Gordon Ramsey." She was BRILLIANT in her classroom management skills. I felt very blessed to learn from her what I did that day.
     
  33. redrose176

    redrose176 Rookie

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2017
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    3

    Jan 7, 2018

    What EXCELLENT advice. It is hard to be a novice teacher, feel overwhelmed and then to consistently receive such harsh ratings. Though, I agree with them. It's hard to see that I am doing anything right. Anything worth doing is worth doing well. And it is through hard work we succeed. One of my biggest accomplishments to this day was breastfeeding my daughter. It was so difficult, she was a premie and could not latch on. I pumped consistently for almost 30 days, and kept trying and I can't tell you how many times I looked at the formula and was tempted to use it, but I persisted and after a MONTH, she latched on and I was able to breastfeed her until I got pregnant with my son. The doctor told me she needed formula and he was going to mark her as "Failure to Thrive." Being a new mom that was terrifying, but I persisted...

    Then low and behold I gave birth to my son and he came out of the womb and latched on in less than two minutes and nursed for twenty minutes.

    I have not had an easy life, but that is good because it has caused me to be strong and realize that I will only get what I want by consistent perseverance.
     
  34. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2011
    Messages:
    5,770
    Likes Received:
    1,004

    Jan 7, 2018

    Hopefully with fewer curse words and insults! Lol!

    Good luck and continue persevering! I would also recommend reading smartclassroommanagement.com. It's a blog that has helped me a lot with my classroom management.
     
  35. Obadiah

    Obadiah Groupie

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2015
    Messages:
    1,358
    Likes Received:
    843

    Jan 7, 2018

    I'm assuming the 7 minutes recess is a school policy. That is becoming the new norm in schools, and doesn't make sense psychologically. Adults need recess. It gives our brain a chance to adjust to all the changes that have occurred throughout the time prior to the break. With kids, it's a bit different (but not much). Recess is another learning time, plus the same brain break that adults experience. Recess involves other neurons and other muscles. Recess is an opportunity for more oxygen to the brain; (so is standing up). If outside, much brain growth occurs from the expanse and arrangement of outdoor space that cannot occur in the classroom. In my area, recess often involves encounters with animals and wild plants. I think it was Paul Gaudino (exercise consultant) who mentioned that kids instinctively know they need to move; (adults often tend to be couch potatoes). But however one has recess, the brain actually is working harder during a break than when it is on task.
     
  36. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Fanatic

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2012
    Messages:
    2,855
    Likes Received:
    623

    Jan 7, 2018

    I was reading recently some places do 15 minute brain breaks for every 45 minutes of instruction.
     
    Obadiah likes this.
  37. Obadiah

    Obadiah Groupie

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2015
    Messages:
    1,358
    Likes Received:
    843

    Jan 8, 2018

    Yes, and with excellent results. And although some American schools eliminate recess to supposedly better prepare for standardized testing, Finland, a top scorer on the Pisa tests, I can't recall their exact timing but they emphasize extra recesses not just for the students but also for the teachers. A recommended book to read, not just about recess but also concerning classroom management is
    Walker, Timothy D. Teach Like Finland: 33 Simple Strategies for Joyful Classrooms. N.Y.: W. W. Norton & Co., 2017.
     
    AlwaysAttend likes this.
  38. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2007
    Messages:
    4,466
    Likes Received:
    1,494

    Jan 8, 2018

    7 minute recess? Ridiculous.

    This year, the district "encouraged" us to take a 10 minute recess instead of a 20 minute one. I didn't say anything publicly, but our site silently continued with business as usual.

    As an adult, I need brain breaks. I get antsy. As a kid, I was always the type of student who looked like I was paying attention (sitting attentively, looking at the teacher, nodding in agreement, etc.). I daydreamed quite a bit, though, because I was on overload.
     
    Obadiah and futuremathsprof like this.
  39. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Phenom

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2014
    Messages:
    4,398
    Likes Received:
    1,304

    Jan 8, 2018

    YoungTeacherGuy, you are probably the most level-headed and understanding administrator I’ve ever encountered. Keep up the great work!
     
    svassillion, Obadiah and AlwaysAttend like this.

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. Hrush
Total: 190 (members: 1, guests: 170, robots: 19)
test