First Year Teacher - Classroom Management

Discussion in 'Middle School / Junior High' started by Nbren, Feb 5, 2021.

  1. Nbren

    Nbren New Member

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    Feb 5, 2021

    I work at a private school with students whom have learning differences and the majority struggling with ADD/ADHD. I have tried everything I can think of to get students to stop talking over me/ yelling/ blurting out/ and staying engaged. I am at a loss on how to get these students to listen to me. I’ve tried reward systems, fun games to break up instruction; differentiation; I’ve tried sternly laying down the rules; I’ve tried having private conversations with them and pep-talks. Nothing has worked. I don’t think I’m too nice and I don’t think I’m too mean. What am I doing wrong? I am open to anything.
     
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  3. SECOND-Chance

    SECOND-Chance New Member

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    May 8, 2021

    Pray:praying:
     
    nstructor likes this.
  4. miss-m

    miss-m Devotee

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    May 9, 2021

    With ADHD, work with their energy instead of trying to change it. They need to move? Incorporate physical movement, full body games, and dance into your lessons. They need to talk? Give them group activities to talk and problem solve together. Nothing is working? Do a mindful reset: teach them how to take deep mindful breaths, practice being still for short periods of time, try kid friendly yoga on YouTube.

    Mindful meditation is actually REALLY good for ADHD. Check out ADDitudemag or Understood for ideas. I have ADHD, and so much of it is honestly not intentional. I have horrible executive dysfunction so breaking things down, getting started on tasks, finishing tasks on time, staying organized is just next to impossible. I’m an adult and I’m only just learning how to do most of those things. Kids need explicit, step by step instructions to do what you need them to do, and there are ways to teach those skills that work with their brains instead of fighting them.

    Also, ADHD is largely a lack of dopamine in the brain: high interest and unique activities are going to be much more motivating because they don’t have the same baseline and don’t get dopamine from the same things. Neurotypical people get dopamine from day to day tasks; it helps them get started and there’s a sense of satisfaction when the task is done. ADHD doesn’t always work that way. I don’t have the baseline dopamine to get started, and the routine daily tasks aren’t as rewarding. There’s zero motivation to do it.

    And remember they’re kids. They need to be taught whatever you expect them to do.
     
    vickilyn likes this.
  5. Regan@Off2Class

    Regan@Off2Class Rookie

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    May 13, 2021

    Yes I often teach kids with ADHD and one thing that really helps is taking breaking to talk/ engage learn about them. Find ways to ask them about questions; follow up on things you have asked before, of course appropriate to their personal lives. The person above has amazing strategies stated. Let them get that energy out, stretch, chair exercises and exude energy… YOU got this!
     

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