First year; How much would you change?

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by anewstart101, Aug 3, 2013.

  1. anewstart101

    anewstart101 Cohort

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    Aug 3, 2013

    I am going into a classroom that is fairly well established. It is an autism focus classroom.

    There are set routines and procedures. How much would you change?

    My plan is to keep things as much as I can the same but I am infusing me so that will be different. As the year goes on makes changes that benefit the students.

    This is an autism focus mild to moderate high school class with 9th to 11th graders.

    Stephanie
     
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  3. krmlk

    krmlk New Member

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    Aug 4, 2013

    Perfect question! I am in the same boat! I am new to this school and will have elementary students on the autism spectrum. I will have 4 paras.
    I want to add some of my flavor without changing too much.

    Hopefully, we will get some good input :)
     
  4. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    Aug 4, 2013

    Congrats to both of you! I wouldn't worry about making changes. The room may be established, but that doesn't mean you can't change things to suit your teaching style. We all have different styles, and what worked for the previous teacher may not work for you and vice versa. It will probably be harder on the students if you make changes mid-year, so I would probably just start off with the changes at the beginning of the year, if it were me.

    From the opposite perspective... We just hired a new teacher for our high-needs classroom. The previous teacher had been there for over 20 years. The teacher coming in has a lot of new ideas, and we're all very much looking forward to the changes he will make. We didn't want someone who was just going to come in, ask the paras how things have always been done, and then do that. We wanted someone who could think for him/herself and make a positive change in a room that desperately needed it. The new teacher has been described as "a breath of fresh air" for the new ideas he has proposed.

    Your classroom may not be in desperate need of a change, but don't assume that changing things will be looked down upon. Sometimes people are hoping for it when they bring in someone new.
     
  5. deefreddy

    deefreddy Companion

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    Aug 5, 2013

    first year

    I would probably not change too much in the beginning just so you are not training paras and trying to get students used to a new system at the same time.
     
  6. Luv2TeachInTX

    Luv2TeachInTX Comrade

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    Aug 17, 2013

    AU students are very sensitive to changes in routines and procedures, so I would minimize the changes starting out as much as possible. Introduce new routines and such at a slower pace and frontload as much as possible.
     
  7. Dr Kevlar

    Dr Kevlar Rookie

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    Aug 19, 2013

    All that said, since it is the start of the year it would be easier to change things now than it would be in say, December as has been noted above.

    The kids will of course remember the "old" routine and expect you to follow it. I would begin by tweaking the routines a bit to reflect my own preferences and to ease the kids into some of the new routines that you want to establish.
     

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