first-time teacher needing some advice

Discussion in 'New Teachers' started by eager2teach2007, Jun 30, 2007.

  1. eager2teach2007

    eager2teach2007 Rookie

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    Jun 30, 2007

    Hello all. I graduated last year with a Bachelors in English, and am currently trying to find a job. I have applied for my Temporary Teaching Certificate (which I got approved...I just need to get hired in order to get the actual paper certificate, but I'm temporarily certified to teach now for 3 years, English 6-12, by simply having a bachelors of arts degree). I'm working toward receiving my permanent license, which involves my passing 3 exams (1 of which I've passed, and I have 2 more to take), teaching for at least 1 year, and taking 12 hours in upper-level Education classes at an accredited institution.

    I don't have ANY teaching experience; while I was in school, my advisor said that I didn't need any education classes to teach. I've gone on 1 interview w/ a local high school, who later sent me a letter stating that they had found another qualified applicant. Later that week, I had an excellent interview with a local middle school, but that was 3 weeks ago. I called a week after the interview, and the secretary told me that the principal had not made a decision as of yet, but that he would be calling back all the applicants once his decision was made. Should I call back again, or simply wait? That's my first question.

    I've been reading "The First Days of School" by Harry Wong, which has taught me A LOT about classroom management, rules, how to start off my first day, and other valuable advice on how to be an effective teacher my first day/week of school. I really want to start teaching in the fall, but if I don't have a job by then, should I apply to start substituting to show that I have experience? I'm stressing about it, because I think every interviewer will raise an eyebrow when they see that I don't have any experience. I'm a smart individual, who possesses lots of patience and a passion for education. What else should I do? Any advice and/or feedback would be greatly appreciated.
     
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  3. bigcat

    bigcat Rookie

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    Jun 30, 2007

    Hang in there.....

    Finding that 1st job is hard. Be persistant.......let them know you really want to teach! Go and meet principals face to face...even before you have an interview. Be positive.....and assertive. They want to know that you can manage a classroom. They also know that new teachers have alot to learn...and most of what you learn does not happen until you are in that classroom. I wish you luck. I am a 3rd year teacher...but it took me a while to get my first job...it was an interim position and did not get rehired. I got my 2nd year job in another district where they offered me a job for the next year, however, I finally got a job offer back in the original district where my child was in school. Hopefully this will be the last time I move for a while. But, I was persistant and assertive....and this principal liked that and is taking a chance with me. You can do it....keep your head up and you will be teaching soon.
     
  4. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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  5. MsWK

    MsWK Habitué

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    Jul 1, 2007

    I, too, have a B.A. in English. I even minored in Secondary Ed., and couldn't get a teaching job until I worked in journalism and went back for my master's in Ed.

    There are a LOT of English majors competing for very few jobs. Some professional experience (journalism, editing, etc.) will make your app. stand out to MS & HS administrators.
     
  6. Georgia"Teach"

    Georgia"Teach" Rookie

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    I would definitely start checking out private school options. Now with NCLB rules, a lot of public schools do not hire teachers without some education experience (be it in the classroom or classes). A lot of private schools, on the other hand, do not require teaching certificates. Plus, you almost guarantee that your classes will be smaller! That will allow for more one-on-one time, and is a blessing for a first year teacher!
     
  7. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Well, that I'm not so sure about it. My classes (Catholic Jr/Sr HS) ranged from 32-40 this year. I've had up to 46 kids in a room at a time:eek:
     
  8. katrinkakat

    katrinkakat Connoisseur

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    Jul 2, 2007

    That's true! My daughters went to Catholic schools (me, too) and their classrooms were always close to 40 per class. Other private schools may be different.
     
  9. I want to TEACH

    I want to TEACH Companion

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    Jul 2, 2007

    Could you volunteer at a school to get experience?? This could help you get your foot in the door!!

     
  10. IowaLA

    IowaLA Rookie

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    Jul 2, 2007

    I would definitely sub if you can't find a job. I would like to think I recently got hired as a full time teacher on my qualifications alone :), but I know my having subbed in the district for 2 years was another determining factor. It is a great way to get your foot in the door while gaining experience at the same time.
     

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