First interview.. with Superintendent

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Lych9, Jul 19, 2016.

  1. Lych9

    Lych9 Rookie

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    Jul 19, 2016

    Hello!

    So I have an interview coming up at a district, it is my first interview and it's with the Superintendent.

    I have never heard of a first interview being with the Superintendent! So I'm unsure of what to expect. Anyone experience this or have insight as to what I should expect!?

    Thanks!!
     
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  3. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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    Jul 19, 2016

    Well... if they're trying to streamline the process? I would say prepare the same way you would meeting a principal or other admin. Make sure you're well prepared with your updated resume, and with answers to their questions as well as have some of your own in the back pocket. Know about who you are as a teacher, your philosophy and management techniques, differentiation of diverse learners, collaboration with colleagues and parents, and know a little about the school you want to work in.

    Good luck!
    :):peacesign:
     
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  4. mckbearcat48

    mckbearcat48 Cohort

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    Jul 19, 2016

    Yeah, it seems every district interviews differently. Some use a principal alone, some have the superintendent, and some have panels of teachers along with admin. The game remains the same, however (It's just more names to remember). At least in a 1 on 1 interview, it's not hard to figure out who to address with an answer. As stated earlier, make sure you do your research on the school. Like people, districts like to hear that you know good things about them.
     
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  5. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    Jul 20, 2016

    I had my first experience being interviewed by a superintendent this summer. It was odd to say the least. I hope I don't have to work closely with her, since she seems kind of confrontational and negative. I still got the job though (employing my "killing with kindness" techniques I learned from members of this forum actually works and not just for dealing with students!). My first jobs, I never talked to the superintendent.

    I would say that if you're just interviewing with the superintendent, treat it differently than if you were interviewing with a principal. A principal or AP is trying to get a feel to see if you'd be a good fit for their school. The superintendent is most likely just trying to find out that you're not a sociopath and you'll actually take your job seriously, since they may or may not have much experience with the particular school environment you're applying for anyway.

    In this recent interview the super told me she prided herself on the amount of turn-over that occurred after her hiring (I think she viewed it as getting rid of old teachers afraid of changing to meet the new standards). Yeesh. I think if we view students failing as a failure on the part of the teacher, high teacher turnover should also represent a failure on the part of the district to retain, retrain, and make staff feel competent, welcome, and respected.
     
  6. MLB711

    MLB711 Comrade

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    Jul 20, 2016

    I interviewed with a superintendent because the school with the open position did not have a principal. She was incredibly tough and I didn't end up with the job. Fast forward 6 months later and another school in the same district hired me for a mid-year opening. I met the superintendent for a 'rehire interview' basically and she commented that my interview skills were markedly improved.

    Make sure you practice and you are confident in your answers. Don't show that you're nervous. Get enough sleep. Mentally prepare for a tough interview so that you are ready to answer questions on your feet. And like other posters said, know your basic philosophy and management style.
     
  7. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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    Jul 20, 2016

    This is the difference between a novice and a seasoned teacher. When you go in for your first big interview, you have NO IDEA what you're doing. You're sitting there thinking, "God I hope they don't see me sweating like a storm!" and hoping not to sound like an idiot. They ask you questions and you come with canned, cliched things that you had read in a textbook. You really just want them to like you. Then you do get experience, figure out who you are as a teacher and it becomes a lot easier to interview. It's still tough especially if it's for a position /school you really want, but it's easier. You can sit there, calmly, and explain to them who you are. Because you know. You know what works and what doesn't in a classroom and really see the admin as your colleagues. I just remember that these people were once teachers too. :handfist::fist:And so I talk to them educator to educator. I'm at my best when it's a very normal, friendly conversation about teaching. Just remember: if you're sitting in the interview, they are interested in YOU!:D They've taken time to wade through the application and selected you. Just be you and sell that to them. I've gone on so many interviews it's crazy. But I weirdly enough, just love the experience itself even if I don't get the job. I wonder if I could interview professionally full-time for money? LOL :rofl::toofunny:
    My advice: ALWAYS provide concrete examples if you can even if they don't necessarily ask for them.
    E.g. "What does differentiated instruction mean to you?" Tell them and then explain a situation in which you actually accommodated a student's needs. And don't just say, "I provided a scaffold." :mad::warning: You want to think about some instructional or assessment change you made for a particular student during the lesson. I taught ELL's and could go on for days about those guys. :heart:Those are the coolest kids!
     
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2016
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  8. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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    Jul 20, 2016

    Fixed that for you. ;)
    A crappy administration can absolutely lead to all kinds of problems with the staff. "Sh** rolls down hill!"
    In my district, we had a Super who was hired from another (that she left crashing and burning, it was this huge thing), but we had A LOT of turn over. In one school, 30 teachers walked out of their contract mid -year and the P was fired! Not good. Our "trainings" for new teachers (me) in the District was terrible. Nobody really knew what the expectations were for the "school - wide initiatives" so they were poorly implemented across the school campuses. The curriculum was new and nobody really knew what to do with it. And there wasn't any first year teacher workshops or mentoring AT ALL in the district that was really effective or properly monitored. We had a "mentor," technically we were assigned one (who didn't even want the job,) and after a few "New Mustang meetings," he ended them altogether. It was a mess. It definitely did not leave a good impression of the District on me. And things weren't much better at the school (A lot of turn over there too) and cliquey behavior from the Principal and her friends (who rose to power positions at her side, of course). One became the new AP next year. UGH! Nobody really did their jobs and left my team (all new to the District with a rough group of kids) stranded alone on the island. And we asked for help A LOT! I didn't feel the love and thought there was a lot of incompetent people in positions with way too much power so I had to get the hell out of there and fast! Is AZ a complete mess or are there decent districts? Somebody please tell me!

    :mad::banghead:
     
  9. Lych9

    Lych9 Rookie

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    Jul 23, 2016

    Thank you everyone for the advice! It ended up being a panel interview. I did pretty good, but it was my first interview at a district so I had no idea what to expect. I was not selected to move on as 2 other candidates had more district teaching experience than me. A little bummed but it was a great learning experience for me and I know I'll do better next time! I was honestly very surprised at the questions asked because I felt they were not very in depth. Only about 6 to 8 questions. None related to my teaching style, differentiating, why I wanted to work there etc. I was basically asked my previous experience, how I communicate with families, what common core standards were, and how I'd handle teaching a special ed student in a general education glass. Then he normal strength weakness question and that was it!! I was given a chance to ask questions and when I began asking one of the board members rolled their eyes and sighed at me! Oh well! Guess he was burned out since I was one of the last interviews. Haha
     
  10. mckbearcat48

    mckbearcat48 Cohort

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    Jul 23, 2016

    Well, you got a shot to interview...maybe the next one is your yes.
     
  11. teacherquestions

    teacherquestions Rookie

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    Jul 26, 2016

    Good luck! My superintendent interview was the last one and I got the job :)
     
  12. Sarge

    Sarge Enthusiast

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    Jul 28, 2016

    How small are the districts you all work in? At my last district, I interviewed for an AP job and the panel consisted of a principal, a secretary, a program specialist, and the director of communications. I didn't get to the second round, so I guess the director of HR might have been in on that one.

    The VP job that I actually got was just a panel of principals (they had multiple positions) and the director of elementary support. Just one interview.

    When my last school was hiring a principal, the superintendent actually said that she would consider to to be micromanagement for her to be on the panel.

    I've never interviewed for a teaching job anywhere that consisted of anyone higher than a principal.
     

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