First day with student teacher

Discussion in 'General Education' started by kcjo13, Jan 4, 2008.

  1. kcjo13

    kcjo13 Phenom

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    So today was my first day with my ST...sigh. I hope this is not an indication of the rest of the semester. She is nice, but she showed up 15 minutes late. :eek:hmy: I mean, come on. It's your first day. Make the effort. My kids knew she was coming today, and were very excited to meet her so I had to stall because she wasn't there. OK, I didn't have to, but I didn't want to undermine her any more than she already had to herself. The principal even came in to welcome her. I tried to cover for her, give her the benefit of the doubt, I know she has kids, but still. :huh:

    She didn't eat lunch with the rest of the teachers, choosing instead to go out to lunch. Yes, we have an open campus, but come on!

    I had her do a very brief, get to know you lesson with the kids, nothing heavy, we talked about it beforehand, just one of those fun tell me about yourself things. And it did not go well. She just stood there, not saying a word. When she did talk, I could barely hear her. I tried to prompt her, and my kids, God bless them, you could tell were trying to make her talk-these are sixth graders! They were politely asking questions and being very well behaved, and she did nothing. She would not move around the room, even after I asked her to help a group, she just stood there. It was weird, because she did not indicate at all that she was nervous, or intimidated, or whatever. Later, she talked about how she thought the lesson went well-:eek: I tried to politely point out things like movement, and, you know, saying something, but I'm not sure it sunk in.

    Bizarre. She came in with loads of confidence, she is older, has children herself, been in schools before. Definitly not what I had in mind...
     
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  3. MissFroggy

    MissFroggy Aficionado

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    Wow.... let's hope this is a situation where in the end you can say she was one of those people who shows amazing improvement. Being late and going out to lunch aren't great--- but the lesson thing is worrisome!

    Hope for the best!
     
  4. loves2teach

    loves2teach Enthusiast

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    I am having a student teacher starting next week... I pray mine isn't this way (And that yours has a breakthrough soon lol). Mine seems wonderful so far. Perhaps it was just first day jitters?
     
  5. SarahJ

    SarahJ Companion

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    Oh dear. I'm incredibly shy, but more in front of the teachers than the students. I did make an effort though and if I pretend to be confident then I become more confident. I do also speak quietly, but always make a point of telling the children to tell me if I'm too quiet and then gauge how loudly I need to talk.

    Is there any way you can go on an errand - to the next classroom perhaps - for 2 mins and tell her you're leaving her in charge (with a planned lesson of yours to teach) and see what happens? alhtough could be chaos will break out! You never know :)

    I really hope she has a marvelous change in attitude by Monday! That could be quite a challenge for you! Good luck
     
  6. MaryKayLaturno

    MaryKayLaturno Rookie

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    so why don't you just tell her, straight up, where she's messing up? Why sugar coat it?

    You have a student teacher for what, 15 weeks? That's not enough time to 'hope' she gets the message.

    Tell her in no unclear terms, "you need to work on tardiness - Everyone has life issues, get them in check and show up on time. Your politics - staying on campus for lunch and getting to know the staff/admin. Classroom management and here's why"

    Don't beat around the bush, you are in charge of this person's professional development, and that's a large charge. True, it doesn't affect YOU if they fail, but professionalism would make me want to succeed.

    It does sound like you are going to have one, very long semester, though. I have never understood other people's lack of work ethic in cases involving your career. I showed up 2 weeks early to my assignment (University ended on Dec. 11th and the school district I worked was still going for another week and a half) I always got there early and volunteer coached so I stayed late.

    Maybe it's a good thing I don't take on student teachers. I may be expecting too much when it comes to professionalism.

    My supervising teacher focused on a couple of main points with me.

    University deadlines
    Classroom management
    Politics (never to be underestimated) she arranged meetings with the the staff, the admin staff, even the superintendant, made them aware of my volunteering of coaching hours, etc (all the little things)
    "Housecleaning" she called it - all the things like attendance, grades, lesson plans that have to be worked into daily patterns
     
  7. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    Did she explain why she was late?
     
  8. deedee

    deedee Connoisseur

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    Jan 4, 2008

    I hate it when people are late ...but Im kind of a freak about leaving early for everything! Maybe she was just nervous and unsure of her place on the first day. As for not eating luch maybe she didnt feel comfortable or needed to go back home for some reason. Hopefully things will improve! I know we are told that its best to not eat in the teachers lounge, to stay out of some of the drama and negativity that can be seen there.

    Good Luck!!
     
  9. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    I wouldn't have had lunch with the teachers either, so I won't hold that against her. But, clearly, you will have some issues to work through so I wish you the best of luck. :)
     
  10. kburen

    kburen Cohort

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    I do have to say that my supervisor told me the same thing as DeeDee has stated....The teachers lounge is a place where people tend to be negative. That's where people form a lot of opinions about students (and other teachers) that they don't know, based on what others say. We were told that we could eat in the lounge if we wanted to....But not to feel bad if we chose to eat in the classroom or even with the students for that reason.
     
  11. wig

    wig Devotee

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    I have had student teachers. I had one who had a horrible first day, but improved vastly as the days went on. Do you think she was simply scared to death the first day? I would not judge her on her first day.

    While I think Mary Kay's post was a bit strong , I do agree that you should not "beat around the bush" about potentially prolematic areas. However, sprinkle it with compliments about the positve things you see happening.

    One thing that really helped me was a notebook that we both wrote in - questions, comments, suggestions, requests, etc. We left it on the desk. I wrote on the left side she wrote on the right. We often used it as a basis for our conference times. It is easy to forget things you want to talk about later. BTW: In the notebook I would always write positive things I noted during the day. However I also wrote down areas that she needed to work on, or suggestions for a better way to handle something. The student teachers always took it with them at the end of the time spent with us as a rememberance.
     
  12. DaveF

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    MaryKayLaturno

    Why is this name allowed on the forum. Great name for a troll.

    From Wiki: Mary Kay Laturno is a former schoolteacher infamous for having two children with one of her teenaged students. She was convicted of statutory rape and sentenced to seven years in prison.

    I thought the name was familiar.
     
  13. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Dave, in another thread she stated that it was either that name or Debra Lafae(?). I don't think its a troll b/c she's not really trying to stir anything up. I just think this person as a different sense of humor.
     
  14. SchoolRocks

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    I love the notebook idea! During my student teaching I was nervous, but I realized that I had to overcome that to really get the most out it. My college prepared us in advance for S.T. They constantly stressed the importance of arriving EARLY and staying LATE. I followed this and I had the best experience! I learned more form S.T. than my entire college education:haha: I also stayed in the lounge during lunch and I did see and hear tons of "stuff".:yawn: But it did give me a chance to bond with my coop teacher and see the dynamics of a "teachers lounge". I hope your ST begins to see the importance of this experience. I would suggest talking to her, maybe she does not see the importance of everything :confused: Good luck:D
     
  15. MaryKayLaturno

    MaryKayLaturno Rookie

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    geeze, is this name that big of a deal? what if I said I sell Mary Kay and my last name is Laturno?
     
  16. kcjo13

    kcjo13 Phenom

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    Hey all,

    I'll try to update you on the situation, and answer as many questions as I can remember that were asked!

    She came only about 5 minutes late today...an improvement! During our break, I started a conversation with her about how our day has been lengthened and some of our elementary is against this, and how it makes it more difficult to get here on time, but that punctuality is important (I suppose that would be the "sugar coating" some were talking about, but I do have to work with this person every day for 4 months, I don't want to be confrontational yet).

    As for not eating with the other teachers, I know about the politics, but you have to understand the setup of a rural school. We are talking about 7 teachers-total-who do everything together. I know the reason she left campus yesterday, it was personal, and necessary, but today she didn't leave and ate in the cafeteria. Alone.

    I would be surprised if someone didn't have the jitters on the first day. The thing that disturbed me yesterday was how she talked about what a success the lesson had been, after it was clearly not. Today I had her help with a social studies assignment. We had worked on it in class yesterday, and today we were comparing answers. I had given her the expected responses and talked with her about how to judge an acceptable answer, and we talked about movement throughout the room, speaking clearly, etc. That just didn't really happen, but I suppose I saw a little progress from yesterday. Very quiet, no movement, no attempts to involve the kids in the discussion, just read the answers. But a little more relaxed, so maybe I should just chalk it up to nerves. Again, afterward she was a totally different person-very confident that it went well, almost cocky about it! You would think, after several semesters of practica and observations that I could expect a little more, but I'll be patient for now.

    I love the notebook idea! My CT did something similar, and I don't know why I didn't think of that earlier. We got to sit down today and put together a schedule for her teaching, and I think that will help to make a concrete goal on paper. Maybe I didn't mention this before, but I had never met this person up until yesterday. The college was late with placement, and so therefore we had no time to preplan anything. I'm sure that was very difficult on her as well, going into a situation cold. I'm not totally heartless, I understand that it is hard on her end also. But I also think that being totally new to this school, and ultimately wanting a job here, you would be bending over backwards to impress everyone. Anyway, she will be observing for another week, then starting small with one subject. I gave her my projected unit plans, and asked her to come up with some ideas she might want to use for that one subject (reading), and sent her home for the weekend. We'll see how next week goes. I'm going to have her working with some small groups, maybe starting smaller will help her confidence when she gets in front of the whole group.

    Wish me luck! I'm outta here for the weekend...I need an early Friday if this is an indication of how the semester is going to go...
     
  17. MaryKayLaturno

    MaryKayLaturno Rookie

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    you adressed the tardy issue fine. If it happens again though, give NO "sugar" :lol:

    Still, 2 days late in a row and just 2 days in. IDK, doesn't seem like a great way to "impress everyone" at the school she later wants a job at.

    Problem is, late for personal issues later leads to out for personal reasons. We had a s.t. here last year that was late everyday (due to her kids) Although they went to the k-12 school we work at, she still would be late. Funny, I have a daughter that goes here too, in elementary like S.T. did, but I had no problems getting here on time. She was also out.... a lot. I understand, that teachers have 'days' they can use, and student teachers do to, but she went over her alotment by about 10 days.

    But, she got hired here for this year, so what do I know.
     
  18. kcjo13

    kcjo13 Phenom

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    Even though this doesn't have anything to do with the thread, since it was brought up (and I guess I can't hijack my own thread), I'll admit I was a bit taken aback by the name also. When a group of teachers sees a name such as this, hackles start to rise because of the bad reputation former teachers such as the real Ms. Letourneau (the actual spelling) and Ms. Lafave have given us all. I could compare it to posting on an AA message board with a screen name like BritneySpears.

    I'm sure your intentions are purely good here, but please understand that we get defensive sometimes, especially since this board had a very bad experience recently with a flamer who attacked several members. It's kind of like a little family here, we got each others backs...
     
  19. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Mary, I was just trying to let others know that you are not a troll. How is the former ST doing now that she's a teacher there at the school?
     
  20. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    Two days late in a row is just terrible.

    Mary...I cannot believe that ST was hired after missing over ten days. Here STs receive five sick days for the semester, so this would mean that the ST you are talking about missed at least fifteen. I'm not going to do that math, but that's a significant percentage out of the classroom.

    I missed one day while STing because my tooth broke, and I felt terrible about that!
     
  21. MaryKayLaturno

    MaryKayLaturno Rookie

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    MaryKayLaturno was the only thing that would fit. I couldn't even have enough room for spaces between the name. :2up:
     
  22. MaryKayLaturno

    MaryKayLaturno Rookie

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    she's fills a position. Not really sure, though. I don't have a lot of interactions with her during the day. She has the rough classes. She still comes 15 minutes before class (that's 30 minutes late)
     
  23. purplecrazy21

    purplecrazy21 Comrade

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    I think it is really unprofessional for your ST to be late. Punctuality is very important and this should be addressed with her.
    I wonder though, are you sure you didn't expect too much too fast from her especially since she was a late placement?
    When I student taught, the first 2 days were strictly observation days. I got to sit and watch the flow of the class, read the handbooks and teacher manuals, and slowly get to know the kids in their environment. My CT did introduce me, but I was not expected to present any lessons of my own. This really helped me because I am a very visual person. I like to watch and get an idea of how things work before I jump in and do them myself. After I do this, I am very comfortable taking the inititive(sp?).
    I'm sure she was very nervous even if she didn't say so, and unsure of her place in the classroom. It's hard to jump into a stranger's classroom without feeling like you're stepping on their toes.
    As far as lunch goes, I might tell her that she's more than welcome to eat with you and the other teachers. Maybe she is just uncomfortable about joining you.
    Next week, maybe back off on expecting her to do lessons by herself. Let her co-teach with you while you do most of the teaching and then gradually release control of the teaching to her subject by subject. My CT had me start giving spelling tests first. then I took over SS and read aloud, and finally I took over LA and Math. Granted, my ST experience was not a great one. You sound like a better CT than mine was. My CT didn't seem to even want to give up control of the classroom.
    Good luck though, I wish you the best with your ST!
     
  24. MaryKayLaturno

    MaryKayLaturno Rookie

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    Teachers are sometimes hired the day before they are to start teaching. They have to deal with it. Late notice or not.

    I was the day before students came at 4pm, that I had a second prep. It would have been unprofessional of me to not be ready the next day, despite the late notice.

    The ST has now dropped the ball 2 times in as many days. Her job is to impress the school and the mentoring teacher. At this point, she would have 2 strikes against her if she were mine.
     
  25. chemteach55

    chemteach55 Connoisseur

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    Teachers are hired all the time the day before they teach. This person is not a teacher she is a STUDENT teacher. I am not saying that she will get better but she has not been hired as a teacher. I am glad that even though she looks like there might be problems, she is being given a chance. That is why we student teach--to learn what we need to do in the classroom. If she does not work out, then do not pass her in the end but at least giving her a chance to get past the 1st couple of days is not "sugar coating" things.
     
  26. MaryKayLaturno

    MaryKayLaturno Rookie

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    A ST is a professional adult at that point. They may be 15 credits shy of having a cotton paper with a fancy stamp on their wall, but student teaching isn't a time to teach work ethic, it's a time to polish, not start from scratch.
     
  27. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    I am exactly the same way Sarah! Part of it is I don't want to mess up in front of the teachers. If I am alone with students, I feel confident and great (they can't really tell when I mess up, so it is so much less intimidating)... Perhaps this is what that ST was experiencing. I was in a class (I work as a tutor) and the teacher put me up in front of the class to do an assignment and it was horrible! It was all last minute, so I felt so unprepared and sort of froze. I know I made a horrible impression on her as far as my teaching abilities, but I wasn't comfortable with being put up front for something that I hadn't prepared for at the last minute. Of course, I do think that the ST in this situation should at least try to fake it since she knew in advance what she was walking in to.
     
  28. chemteach55

    chemteach55 Connoisseur

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    I have been teaching for 10 years and...

    I am just the same. I am fine with students but I hate to have to present with another adult in the room. I did not have to student teach so I do not know how I would have reacted but I still dread an observation. I do agree that the ST should at least try to fake it but it may all be atributed to nerves in the end. Now if she shows up late again Monday that may be a totally different story.
     
  29. Irishdave

    Irishdave Enthusiast

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    Was this the first time you have met?
     
  30. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

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    I'm going to be blunt. You need to say, in no uncertain terms, "You need to be ontime. Being late is unacceptable."

    As a CT, that is part of your job. If you don't, you are doing her no favors.

    When you are a ST, you are on your "best behavior." If the best she can do is be 5 minutes late, she needs to know, in no uncertain terms, that this doesn't cut it. It isn't acceptable for teachers to come late to work each day.

    When we have a ST, they MUST spend the first week observing their CT only. They aren't allowed to teach any lessons at this point. This is their chance to observe and learn techniques. Then they are slowly given specific lesson plans to write and when that is done acceptably, they are permitted to teach specific lessons.

    Then gradually, they are given control for 1 part of the class each day, until they work up to half the day. Then, they are given whole day charge, with the CT watching, observing, and daily evaluation meetings.

    It is stressful, but this way the ST is given the scaffolding and support that is needed to succeed.

    If it were me, and she was late a third time, I would IMMEDIATELY call her student teaching advisor from the school and let them know that their student was not living up to the BARE MINIMUM required.

    Being a CT is kind of like teaching -- you aren't there to be their friends.. you are there to be their teacher. You want to be kind, but you owe to them to be firm and require performance. When a student doesn't live up to requirements, we tell them immediately -- we don't wait for it to become a habit to recognize and deal with it.

    I hope this doesn't come across as too blunt, it isn't meant that way. I've just seen too many times when CTs say nothing until things get totally out of hand -- and then nobody has a good experience, and the ST is set up for failure.

    Often times, schools don't adequately prepare teachers to be CTs. It is another example of how our profession sometimes lets us down when it comes to giving teachers what they need to succeed.

    You have a great heart, and I know you want to be kind and help her succeed. Just remember that the kindest thing you can do is hold people responsible for their own success, and bring it to their attention immediately when they don't do so. Make her accountable.
     
  31. chemteach55

    chemteach55 Connoisseur

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    RainStorm--I agree with what you are saying. I had a friend who had the student teacher from h*ll and he would complain everyday on our shared off period how bad she was. I finally asked what was he doing about it because he was the one in charge. He sat down with the girl that afternoon afterschool and found out that she did not want to be a teacher but just wanted to finish out her degree. She said that she had realized the first day that she had been in his classroom that she was not cut out to be a teacher. She ended up failing in ST so she was 12 hours shy of having enough hours to graduate that May but she was going to pick up the 12 hours in the summer and get a degree in general studies instead of education. This was several years ago and I think now that most programs put you in the classroom way before it is time to ST.
     
  32. wig

    wig Devotee

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    is she supposed to keep the same hours as you? If so, she was more than five minutes late. I agree that you really cannot cut her slack in that area any more. To come after the kids do two days in a row is unprofessional.

    You can't really force her to eat lunch with you, but continue to invite her.

    My student teachers observed the first day or two, did small group work, paper work, etc. the rest of the week. During that week (if not before) we set up a schedule that worked her/him gradually into teaching full days. He/she had to develop a unit in three subject areas, which also included bulleting boards.

    I was fortunate in that my first student teacher came from a school that had the entire schedule laid out and expectations (keep same hours as teachers, attend staff meetings, etc.) The other placements were more vague so I just followed the first one.

    I do not think you are heartless at all. You are very kind. Sugar coating is OK if you get your point across.
     
  33. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

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    Same here. We had a guide book that laid out the expectations. It went so far as tell the ST that they weren't allowed to eat in the teachers lounge but MUST eat with the students each day! It also said that all female STs MUST wear a dress or a skirt each day (absolutely no pants allowed) and all male STs MUST wear a tie with a tie tack each day, and shined shoes. (These were the universities rules, not ours.) It really seemed to go a bit overboard, but at least it was totally clear what was expected. The university required that STs sign an agreement, agreeing to abide by these rules, or they would refuse to place them in a school. They recently changed the rule that wouldn't allow STs to wear braids or dreads...but for years, that university (it was a historically African-American university) absolutely refused to place any ST with braids or dreads. They didn't change that until 2005. Can you imagine?

    STs also had to arrive 15 minutes BEFORE their CTs teaching day began, to make sure they got there on time. STs were not allowed to leave before 4pm (which was 15 minutes after CTs could leave for the day.)

    It was all laid out, and (whether you agree with it or not as a ST) you knew exactly what was expected, required, and what you had to do to pass ST and receive an A. Forms where faxed by the CT to the university each week, which asked very specific questions -- did the ST arrive to work on time, work all assigned hours, complete all tasks assigned, where all tasks done to your satisfaction, have a positive attitude toward your advice and suggestions, etc. etc. If there was a negative response, you would see a university advisor at your school the next day to speak with the ST directly.

    In our area, schools are not terribly willing to take STs in state testing grades (which is 3, 4, and 5 for elementary) and yet, universities require that at least half of the ST be done in an upper elementary class (for the K-5 certification.) Universities here are very guarded to make sure their STs don't cause hard feelings with the school. Many schools get ticked off with one local university (we have three here) and won't take ANY STs from there. This makes it difficult for that university to find ST placements.

    Our school district also requires that CTs go through a training program before they can be CTs to make sure they are prepared to be an actual "supervisor" and "guide." It stresses being positive, but to make sure you are supervising the ST.
     
  34. SarahJ

    SarahJ Companion

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    Jan 4, 2008

    My Uni sets guideline, but more baout WHAT we have to teach. I.E we have to teach 10 reading lessons and 15 writing, 6music, 6 PE/movement, 3 Technology, 6 Science, 4 2nd language lessons, 20 numeracy and so on, but then they also brek them down to say your 2nd language lessons have to be 1 oral, 2 reading,1 writing and the science you have to cover the following areas (very broad like earth, natural science, space and planets, forces) and so on. It does make it a little restrictive but at elast they make sure you're covering everything and you don't just teach your strong points. If iI could choose I would have done numeracy, science and tech and PE my whole practical! lol

    The downside is, not all the lessons fit into the teachers theme for the month/term and not all subjects are taught in K -3 at our schools (like Science and tech and the 2nd language that I studied) so the teacher lost teaching time so i could do my lessons. SO usually when they would be doing art I did Science, or instead of writing they did technology or I was only given half a class at a time and 20 minutes for my lessons. Sigh. But, I passed(with MUCH more than the minimum) which is what counts.

    My other issue was the I was self supporting and HAD to have a job in order to complete my prac. The problem was my house was broken into so everything that had been planned for my prac along with my laptop and just ebout eveything else in my house was stolen so the money I had saved to live on for the duration of my prac now had to be used to repair breakages and buy a new laptop and re-make all my resources for my prac. So I had to leave 30 minutes early 4 days a week. It was a pain but otherwise I would have not been able to afford to live. I know I lost marks for that, but the teachers were upfront about it from the beginning and I actually agreed with them. I was lucky tho to have understanding teachers. My mentor teacher should not have been my mentor teacher, she had too much else on her plate (think I discussed this in another thread).

    A lot of the schools in the area do not like students from one particular University because they do not know how to work and do not apply themselves and are in general a waste of time. All the 'decent' students from that Uni transfer in their 2nd year.

    All in all I had a good prac though, but only 1 teacher actually verbally crit my lesson and it was from that one single lesson that I learnt the most. It doesn't help to say, OK yes that went well. My one mistake was listening to the TA in the class. she told me not to do something coz the teacher would not like it so my lesson flopped and the the teacher asked 'Why had I not done xyz and used abc' which put me in a tough spot coz the assistant was right there glaring at me...don't think she liked me much.
     
  35. MissFroggy

    MissFroggy Aficionado

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    Jan 5, 2008

    Student teachers need to come in when you come in, leave when you leave! If that means her hours are 7 am- 6 pm, so be it! I know she has a child, so that has to be somewhat flexible, but the only way she will be able to take over the class is to put in the time, especially prepping in the morning. I think you need to dock her grade if this keeps up! Or at least write it in your final review.
     
  36. kcjo13

    kcjo13 Phenom

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    Jan 5, 2008

    I hear what you are all saying. Trust me, the tardiness is going to have to stop immediately. I am the least punctual person I know, but I have trained myself to get to where I am going on time. And I'm sure that never having met me before (to answer Dave) or never being in this school before her first day was a shock. But wouldn't you think that you would over estimate the time to be there and get there plenty early?

    The thing about this situation that makes it difficult is that we don't get a lot of support from the university, unfortunately. It's one of those warm-body situations. The smallish town where the university is located is overwhelmed with ST so they look to smaller towns to take a few. We happened to be asked this round. But there is no real formal handbook. Its kind of every ST for himself once you are out there. Don't get me wrong-I attended this same university and had a very good experience. But without tooting my own horn too much, I am a self starter and took the initiative to call the school, make friends, come to summer school and pre school meetings, etc. When I say she had a late placement, I don't mean Wednesday night. She could have called.

    As for having her in front of the class, I really believe at this point in your program, you should be able to stand in front of a class of students and introduce yourself properly. Speak clearly and loudly. Walk around a room and engage students. With the number of practica that undergrads go through, that is not unreasonable in my book. Of course, she will be observing for the next couple of weeks before taking over one class at a time. Again, the thing that just shocked me the most was her overconfident (and, frankly, wrong) attitude before and after the short activity.

    Can I say without sounding un-PC that this person is a nontraditional student? She's older than I am. By a lot. The only reason that I bring this up is to point out that this isn't her first rodeo, job-wise. She has been an office worker for something like 9 years.

    I guess I don't know what I am trying to point out here. I just found the combination of confidence-almost-cockiness, brazen tardiness, isolation, and then not really performing kind of off-putting.

    Please don't think bad of me for saying this, but I guess I remember looking at my CT like she walked on water 'cause (a) she just knew exactly what to do with kids and (b) she was exactly what I wanted to be (when I grew up). I guess I was looking for that same admiration and instead I'm seeing a non caring attitude?

    Sigh.
     
  37. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

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    Jan 5, 2008

    Yes. Totally. It may have happend once -- something awful that kept her from getting there one time. That it happened again the next day is totally inexcusable.

    But did you tell her, in no uncertain terms "This is not acceptable?"
    If not, you need to.

    If she gives you some excuses...no matter how good they sound, simply say "I undersstand, BUT you need to understand that I won't be giving you a passing grade in Student Teaching if you are late."

    If you haven't already, tell her what time she is expected to be there each day, and what time she may leave. It should mirror your hours. This isn't a negiotiation. If she can't meet your hours, you need to tell her this isn't working out, let's call your university and see if they can find you another placement that will meet your hours, because if you want to stay here, you MUST work 7am to 4pm (or whatever hours you work.)


    Yes, so they are quite lucky that you took a student teacher. She is incredibly lucky to have you. For her to act any differently is not acceptable. You are giving up your time, and interrupting your schedule to help her become a teacher. (I know in my district we get a whopping $40 for our troubles...and it is custom here to spend that $40 on getting a gift for your ST at the end of the experience.)

    There is NOTHING wrong with letting her know she is lucky to have you. But again, you can't just wait and see. Let her know right away. Tell her, "I'm giving up time with my class to help you learn. I expect you to give this 100% of your effort" if that is necessary.

    You can't be tenative. You can't "wait and see."

    What is really unfair is to say little or nothing, and then give her a bad grade. Tell her right up front "If I don't see 120% from my STs, they shouldn't expect anything above a C." "If my STs are late, they will not pass." Etc. Remind her that you hold her grade in your hand -- because you do.

    Maybe she is shy. Maybe she was nervous. But you are totally right -- if she wants to be a teacher, she needs to learn to take some initiative. Of course she should have contacted you earlier. Maybe she falsely assumed you would make the first contact. The time to address that was the first time you met. "I'm surprised you waited this late to contact me." That would have given her a chance to explain, and then you would know why she didn't contact you sooner. Now its a bit too late to say much about it.

    Of course she should be able to introduce herself.

    When she was finished, did you speak to her privately after school and say "When you were introducing yourself today, I couldn't hear you. You need to speak up!" Let her know that right after school for 15 minutes (or how ever long) each day, you will be going over your notes with her on her performance. Don't sugar coat it. By now, she should already know that you aren't happy.

    Does she know that?

    Yep. Been there. I've seen this. Its the "I"m all that and a bag of chips" syndrome. Its the "I know how to teach, and I can't believe they are making me student teach" syndrome. Its the "I'll grudgingly put in my hours even though I don't need it, because I'm already ready to teach" syndrome.

    A simple statement "We need to talk about your performance." Let her know you aren't satisfied and that she is going to have to prove herself to you.

    Yep. I can see it. It is awful when this happens. You want so badly to give them the benefit of the doubt, but you can see the handwritting on the wall.

    If I had an ST who sat by herself at lunch, and it bothered me, I'd simply say right before lunch, "Bring your lunch and come back to the classroom at lunch time. We can talk about your performance during lunch." And then do it.



    Don't think bad of you? You haven't done anything "bad." You are trying to be nice, and you can see that isn't going to get to anyplace. I'm guessing it might be hard for you to be blunt, and you don't want to upset her.

    My :2cents: (or $1.98 actually) start being blunt. Don't engage in arguements about what you expect, just state it. Be a broken record.

    If you are late, I will not give a passing grade in student teaching. I'm sorry your car broke down, but this is the third time. If you are late, you will not get a passing grade in student teaching.

    Your alarm didn't go off? I'm sorry to hear that. It is too bad that I won't be able to give you a passing grade in student teaching.

    Maybe we should call your university, and let them know that things aren't working out. Perhaps they can find another teacher who will give you a placement this late in the semester who won't mind that you are late frequently, because you see, if you are late with me, you will not get a passing grade in student teaching.

    You may have hit it on the head. She may feel she doesn't need student teaching, already knows it all, and she is just going through the motions.

    Now this may make you think I'm a bad person, but if after talking with her, I found this to be the case, I would make her student teaching experience as difficult as possible. Does that make me a bad person? Perhaps. But it makes me human. If I give up my time to try to help someone else reach her professional goals, then in my book, she owes me something. Respect for one thing. Hardwork for another.

    Some STs are under the mistaken impression that it "helps a teacher out" to have a student teacher. It doesn't help me out! It makes more work for me. It changes the dynamic of my class. It slows down my class's pace in keeping up with the districtwide curriculum. I'm willing to do these things for a person who is willing to give 100%, work hard, and learn, learn, learn.

    Personally, I love having STs in the class. I love watching them "learn the ropes," and gain the confidence they need to be great teachers. But I've had one or two cocky ones, who thought they knew everything. I had one who, on her second day, told me she had a much better classroom managment system and that I should "change" to it. I thought that was a lot of nerve for a person on their second day.

    Did she have the fun, supportive time most of my other STs had? Nope. She got the "all business" approach. After the third week, she woke up, and the rest of the placement was smooth sailing.

    I had another ST who never woke up. We butted heads all semester long. I had the university advisor come out and, in her presence, had a very frank discussion about where things were going. The advisor gave the ST a choice -- get with the program, or fail student teaching. It was tense. It was not pleasant. But that is the reality of being a CT sometimes.

    Good luck!
     
  38. kpa1b2

    kpa1b2 Aficionado

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    Jan 5, 2008

    "Some STs are under the mistaken impression that it "helps a teacher out" to have a student teacher. It doesn't help me out! It makes more work for me. It changes the dynamic of my class. It slows down my class's pace in keeping up with the districtwide curriculum. I'm willing to do these things for a person who is willing to give 100%, work hard, and learn, learn, learn."

    I've been asked by a local university if I would take a ST this next semster. I agreed, but haven't heard anything yet. I think my husband was under the impression that a ST would mean I would have less work to do. The look on his face when I told him that it would increase my work load was amazing!

    If I actually get one, it would be my 1st ever.
     
  39. cheeryteacher

    cheeryteacher Enthusiast

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    Jan 5, 2008

    Please talk to her and let her know what she needs to do to improve her lessons. Or even videotape her and the two of you can critique together. Maybe if she sees herself she won't brag so much.
     
  40. cmw

    cmw Groupie

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    Jan 5, 2008

    Although I've only skimmed the responses, I don't think I read that she apologized for being late! And late twice in a row does not set a good tone. ALso it sounds like she is getting there right when the kids do instead of the contracted teacher time. When I ST I did not miss any days and often was at school after the teacher left. I was late (teacher start time) a time or so due to bad weather, but did apologize & was there before the kids.
    I'm taking grad. classes & my professor teaches undergrads & tells her students not to go into the teacher's lounge. I would use that approach & say, "ALthough your professors may have told you otherwise, the teacher's lounge is a good place to meet the staff & make connections (which she may need when job hunting)." You can even say they have been asking about her & want to meet her. :D
     

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