'Finished Early' system-what's yours?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Jem, Aug 23, 2013.

  1. Jem

    Jem Aficionado

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    Aug 23, 2013

    Hey, all!

    This weekend's project is to figure out a system for my kids who finish in-class work early.

    What do you use?

    File box filled with activities?
    List of trivia questions to research and answer throughout the year?
    File folder games?
    Other thoughts?

    I was going to fill a hanging file box with enrichment activity sheets, but thought I'd see if I liked anyone else's idea better. ;)
     
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  3. agdamity

    agdamity Fanatic

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    Aug 23, 2013

    We don't have nearly enough time for independent reading, so I have them read.
     
  4. live

    live Companion

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    Aug 23, 2013

    5 options: other unfinished work (which isn't really much of an option since they have to do this before going onto something else), practice math facts, write a journal entry, read a book, or do their classroom job. I might also let an early finisher help other students. It's not on their list of 5 options, but I'll usually just tell the student they can if they would like to (and if they understand that helping doesn't mean giving the answers...).

    I don't like to give the students anything that would make them rush through their work.
     
  5. RadiantBerg

    RadiantBerg Cohort

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    Aug 23, 2013

    Sit quietly listening to your iPod and not disturbing others.
     
  6. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    Aug 23, 2013

    I have a ton of Nat Geos, Science News, Pop Sci, Pop Mechanics, etc. magazines. It's always available for students to flip through. I used to do an "Indpendent Project Folder" but they just didn't work out. Students didn't want to do them, only did half-arsed projects, or only did the current event option with the magazines worth the least amount of points.

    I may make a bunch of current event sheets and allow students to do them for 1 extra credit point each.
     
  7. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    Aug 23, 2013

    1. complete unfinished work
    2. peer tutor
    3. read a book or magazine
    4. practice math facts
    5. task cards (love these!)
     
  8. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    Can you explain more about task cards?
     
  9. iteachbx

    iteachbx Enthusiast

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    There are very few things my administration would feel are appropriate for early finishers. Usually the choices have to do with the subject we're in. In math they can do minute math to practice addition, subtraction, multiplication or division. In writing we have writing prompts (pictures from around the world) where they write a story about the picture in their notebook. In reading, science or ss they usually just take out their book and read. Few choices works for us because they always know what to do when they're done.
     
  10. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    If you do a TPT search for Rachel Lynette, you'll find more task cards than any human (even a hoarder like me :cool:) needs, lol. There are other people who create them, and I'm about to delve into trying to make my own, to suit my students individual needs. Rachel wrote a (free) book on things to do with task cards - you can find it here:

    http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/...dbook-Everything-You-Need-to-Know-FREE-821456

    Here's a quote:
    Task cards are motivating for students because there is only one task per card. Imagine that you are a fourth grader struggling with summarizing. Receiving a packet of paragraphs to summarize in worksheet format will likely feel overwhelming. However, if those same paragraphs are placed on task cards, the student need only deal with one paragraph at a time. He or she feels that sense of accomplishment when one is completed before moving on to the next.
     Task cards can be made to target specific learning objectives. This is great news if your district has adopted Common Core. If your students are weak in a specific area, you can make or purchase a set of cards that focuses on the specific skill. This also makes task cards great for test prep!
     Task cards make differentiation easy. Struggling students can just complete a few cards or complete cards with multiple choice answers. Another option is to allow some students to answer verbally. More able students will enjoy the challenge of open-ended cards and you can also require longer answers. In addition, you can create or purchase sets for different levels.
     Task cards are versatile. A single set of task cards can be used in a variety of ways; individually at centers or stations, in pairs or small groups, and even with the whole class. They can used as part of your daily routine, as enrichment, with games, or even as homework. Further, they can be used with any age group from kindergarten to adult.
     Task cards save paper and ink. Copy, cut, and laminate once. Use for years. Instead of copying piles of worksheets, you need only copy a single answer sheet for each student, or better yet, students can answer on notebook paper or individual white boards. Also, since you only need to print once, it is likely that you can print in color, making the card even more appealing.
     

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