Finding Powerpoints that correspond with the textbooks?

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by 4capulina, Sep 8, 2009.

  1. 4capulina

    4capulina Rookie

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    I was lucky enough to get a fulltime social studies position @ a private school in San Diego. I am going to teach world history for 10th grade & I've received the book i will be using... it is:
    "Glencoe World History Modern Times" By Spielvogel. The Copyright year is 2003. My teacher's edition ISBN # is 0-07-829945-4. Can anyone tell me if they have some powerpoints that correspond with this textbook? I've already emailed the publisher and I'm not sure they are going to get back to me. Just wondering... I'm sure that there are many teachers out there who would benefit by being able to use powerpoint files that correspond with their textbook... I even know a math teacher who uses Powerpoints for some of her lectures & she says it really helps the students!!:thumb: I look forward to getting peoples advice from this forum (because there is so much wisdom here:atoz_love:)
     
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  3. Ron6103

    Ron6103 Habitué

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    I use PowerPoint almost every day, but they don't correspond with my textbook. That said, I like that. I use my textbook as background reading, or supplemental reading. The material I provide is, for the most part, material the book either doesn't cover, or covers in very little depth. In my World History class for example, what my book (Prentice Hall's World History) covers in a mere two sections, or 8 pages, I spend two weeks on.

    Don't feel like you have to follow the textbook exactly... unless you're specifically told you have to.
     
  4. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

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    My English textbooks came with Powerpoints already made. They include vocabulary games, journal prompts, short video clips, etc. There may be something like that available online with your textbook.
     
  5. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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  6. Historyteaching

    Historyteaching Cohort

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    I create my own powerpoints. we use Holt's world history books and they have premade powerpoints. But I found them to be too wordy and basically just took the text and converted it to tables and shorter sentences. I create PPs that gets the info needed to the students that also include what they need to know according to the core content.

    It takes time to create them, but in the long run I'm more satisfied.
     
  7. Brendan

    Brendan Fanatic

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    You really shouldn't be using the books power points. Most of them simply recap the sections. Whats the point of giving notes if they were covered in the reading?
     
  8. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

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    I use the book's powerpoints when they are good, and I don't when they are not. My students usually will not take their books home, and if they can't access the textbook online, they need the information somewhere. I have them take notes to learn how to take notes. Often, the PowerPoints with the series are organized with bullets, outlines, etc. to model how to take notes! I also sometimes use the "Checkpoint" questions while we read, especially with my larger classes, just to help me know everyone was with us, and who might not understand.
     
  9. Brendan

    Brendan Fanatic

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    I treat notes as a supplement to the readings. THey reinforce the basics, but if I covered everything in my notes that they were supposed to read whats the point of actually doing the reading?
     
  10. 4capulina

    4capulina Rookie

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    Good Advice so far.... i really appreciate it. I am good at creating powerpoints on my own, but they are very time consuming & I'm not sure how much time I'll have to do that this coming year. I have to be honest, i often times simply steal (use) other people's ppt's and modify them to my own liking (adding pics or animated GIF's & stuff like that). Anyways, i am going to need to make a decision about what i'm gonna do soon.
    :)
     
  11. Doug_HSTeach_07

    Doug_HSTeach_07 Comrade

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    Sep 9, 2009

    My advice would be to create the PowerPoints yourself. I make all of mine, and the huge upside is that you are actively learning while creating it. This helps immensely when you teach it!
     
  12. Soccer Dad

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    I have to reinforce what the others have stated: don't rely on the textbook! This is a rant I've gone on many times before, but the textbook is NOT the thing your class should be centered on. It's a supplementary item--something that should be used to introduce a topic, reinforce an important lesson, or as a tool for projects. Since you're a new teacher, the text is a great resource. I certainly used mine when I started. But, don't use the publisher's stuff for everything. Make your own tests and notes BASED on the textbook (if you must).

    But I cannot stress enough that you're doing your students a disservice by using everything the publisher makes. (Even the stuff "aligned" with your state's standards are not accurate---how do they know which strands of content need more attention than others?)

    Try Googling--there are thousands of teacher created notes out there. Find a site you like, edit the notes to fit your class, and use.
     
  13. SingBlueSilver

    SingBlueSilver Companion

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    Totally agree...The textbook's powerpoints are really complicated and wordy. You can edit them yourself to what you want, which I've tried, but I find that its a waste of time. It takes me longer to edit one than to create one that has everything I want in it.
     
  14. Brendan

    Brendan Fanatic

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    I could not say this better myself. Textbooks are a tool, not the end all of teaching.
     
  15. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    I don't use Powerpoint; my notes vary from one class to the next depending on how each class goes. But my reaction was the same as Brendan's. Why would a kid actually read the textbook if the notes were going to be the same? It seems to me that the textbook is the starting place, and that the class notes should extrapolate from there.

    And to be honest, I've done some work freelancing textbook writing. Please believe me when I say that presenting a thorough lesson on the material is not their prime motive. They have a LOT of other considerations that simply should not matter in a classroom.
     
  16. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

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    So I teach English. There are more things in our textbook than I could ever have them read, since we also read and do other things that are not in our textbook. However, I like the Presentation software that came with our book. You can change it, but it has little video clips included, journal prompts, grammar, etc. on there, and the students are more engaged when there's something to look at in front of them. Having the pre-reading material (information about the author, vocabulary, focus literary terms, etc.) presented that way means less time staring at the textbook reading, which they hate! Why on Earth would I recreate something that is already right there, with media clips and everything included, especially when I add to those presentations?
     
  17. Brendan

    Brendan Fanatic

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    To be frank, why should a student sit in your class and listen to the same exact thing he read about the night before? Sounds like a waste of everyones time to me. If you are not having them complete the readings and use the powerpoints then I don't see a problem, but if you are having them read then do the powerpoint I don't see the point.
     
  18. Muttling

    Muttling Devotee

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    I live by Power Point. I aggrevate the principle everytime he does an observation. I don't give him a formal lesson plan, just a print out my power point slides.


    That said, rarely do I use text book power points. They tend to be copy pastes of the book. I create my own.
     
  19. Historyteaching

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    I've already posted, but I'll add more.

    My students don't have books to take home. I did not issue them this year. My powerpoints I create myself, but I use the information from the textbook to create the powerpoints of the information that they need for the class and for our core content.

    I do agree, textbooks add much much more then what you typically need. Especially oddball stuff that really wouldn't matter whether you know it or not.

    My students do not sit in class and read, that's boring..the only time they take out their books is to do the section questions and a chapter walk-thru.

    Just make sure that if you don't want to do your own powerpoint, then make sure you adjust to what you need. I've pulled pictures, quotes, words, clips, etc from many other slideshows and websites to create mine. Its..borrowing..we do it alot in the teaching profession :D
     
  20. FossilEDU

    FossilEDU New Member

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    I have to agree - for all the time you spend searching around for a PPT to modify- you could have made one yourself AND caught an episode of shark week.
     
  21. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

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    I don't typically have them read the introductory material at home. We cover that material together in class. I find that the Powerpoint presents it in a better format than the textbook. Plus, my students hate reading anything, especially out of a book. If I put it on a screen I can usually trick them into enjoying it and processing the information, rather than tuning out. Who wants to listen to the teacher read aloud from the textbook?

    Also, I teach students with fairly low reading comprehension. I cannot assign the literature from our textbook for them to read at home and expect it to be meaningful for more than about ten of them. It's simply so far beyond their reading level that I could not expect them to just know the information without needing to have it reviewed. Thus, the Powerpoint, which includes activities for after reading.
     
  22. Brendan

    Brendan Fanatic

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    My only problem with this is the disservice you are doing for students. In their college classes, part of EVERY exam, test, quiz, etc. will be based upon outside reading. This means reading from a textbook.
     
  23. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

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    From a literature anthology full of reading that is several levels above even their instructional level? Maybe. But having them read things they do not understand on their own only means that they learn it wrong, and I then need to reteach it.

    Honestly, maybe 50% of my students are college bound, if you include trade schools. I am not lowering expectations. My students who go to college will be prepared. But I will not assign them reading that is at their frustration level because that is not a meaningful assignment. I think giving students meaningless homework does them a greater disservice. I assign for them to read in their independent level, I assign test prep-type things (shorter passages, excerpts from larger stories, etc.) I assign writing activities, and even grammar activities as homework, but I will not assign The Crucible to a class with an average reading level of 4.8. If I taught enriched, honors, or gifted courses, I certainly would, but not with my students.
     
  24. bandnerdtx

    bandnerdtx Aficionado

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    I'm not sure I agree with this. I was one of those kids in high school who never really had to study or take notes. However when I went to college, I most certainly DID. I didn't learn that skill in high school, but I learned it quickly in college. My point is that they can wait until college to be exposed to that and do just fine.
     
  25. CanukTeacher

    CanukTeacher Comrade

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    I absolutely agree we shouldn't rely on the textbook too much. However, I know many people who have written textbooks and some are very good (others are really bad). It just depends. It also depends on how many new courses you get. It also depends on how good the powerpoints are for the textbook. I have one course where the teacher materials are so good that a teacher can teach the program and it is awesome - it includes DI, MI, etc. I have other programs that are awful. So I think it varies. I also consider the first time through a course survival.
     
  26. Brendan

    Brendan Fanatic

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    Neither did I in High School, but I quickly learned that for reading quizzes in History I would need to read, not rely on the teacher's notes.
     
  27. Soccer Dad

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    I took AP U.S. History way back in the day. Back then, we didn't even have a textbook to use. My teacher "made" his own textbook with copies from some texts, articles from magazines, excerpts from books, etc. We didn't answer questions, either. We annotated. A skill I used frequently throughout college.

    I have to disagree to a large extent. College today is much different from college 20, even 10 years ago. I'm not saying that students can't adapt, but I'm constantly hearing from college professors how kids 1) don't know how to write, 2) don't know how to study, and 3) can't ready, focus, and understand the text.

    I do minimal textbook readings with my average level kids--opting for articles for them to read instead--and incorporating current events articles. But my AP kids will read every page in their text.

    Basically, I'm saying that some people can learn the skill of reading and taking notes, but many, many students suffer through it. And there's really no need to when the skill can be taught in high school. Which, increases critical thinking anyways. (At least when they have to create a thesis statement about the article, summarize it, etc.)
     
  28. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    I'll jump in here.

    In re: publisher-produced PPTs, et al.

    In my experience, the supplemental materials that accompany textbooks generally just repeat the material in the textbook. It seems to me like it's a lot of extra, unnecessary stuff.

    My textbook has a few PPTs, overheads (The 80s called. They want their overheads back.), and workbooks. I can honestly tell you that NONE of the stuff is worthwhile and just takes up space in my textbook storage room.

    I think you'd be far better off writing your own PPTs where you can sort of focus the spotlight on the really important stuff.

    Also, since you'd be writing them yourself, you can be sure to write them in a way that your students will understand. For example, my students really prefer a more informal, peer-to-peer sort of tone. They seem to grasp the material more quickly and thoroughly than when I try to make things sound all academic and fancy. To be clear, I don't 'dumb down' the material....I just make it more accessible to my student population.
     
  29. SingBlueSilver

    SingBlueSilver Companion

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    Textbooks can be thought of as both a service and a disservice for students. I use the textbook mostly as one of many resource tools. I use the glossary, the maps, some of the supplementary materials/worksheets, etc. I do agree that it shouldn't be the ONLY source in a classroom (I have many other resources/supplementals that I purchased myself), but I also think that students need to know HOW to use a textbook. Parts of my textbook are really useful ex: charts, diagrams, timelines, visuals/art/photos, and the students always tend to overlook those things looking ONLY at the text itself. Things like that need to be utilized in the classroom. Students also need to learn HOW to read a textbook. If our master plan for them is to be successful in college, then skills like note-taking and reading textbooks are going to be beneficial because that's all we did in the University.
    I didn't have to work hard in high school to get decent grades, but I also did not have much of a foundation for those skills; they were never taught or embedded in my curriculum. When I started college, I floundered and flailed and had a very difficult freshmen year, and sophomore year was spent digging myself out of academic probation + very expensive summer school. I just feel that if reading the textbook and taking notes had been more required of me when I was in school, then I would have had a bit of an easier time with higher education.
    In many districts across the nation, many graduate high school and go to college, but many times there is a high drop out rate when they get to college because they didn't get what they needed in their elementary/secondary educations.
     
  30. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    In re: reading.

    I think that students need to read more. Period. End of sentence.

    Reading is so good for our brains, vocabulary, stress-level, and about a million other things. As teachers, I think it's our responsibility to encourage students to read whenever possible.

    Even if students can get by in college by annotating and without reading (and I really don't agree with that), I don't think it's easy or ideal. Like, having $5 in your pocket is nice, but having $5,000 in your pocket is better. Yah?

    Now, I don't think it's wise or appropriate to hand a text to a student and say, "Here. Have at it." We need to prep students, sometimes hold their hands until they get comfortable with reading, and teach them how to figure out the meaning behind what they're reading.

    Until they are able to read and understand on their own, I think it's a good idea to do a lot of pre-reading activities. Sometimes guided notes can be especially helpful for take-home reading assignments.

    It's not good enough to say, "My students are bad readers, so I won't ask them to push themselves." As a teacher, you have to help them improve. Maybe they won't walk out of your classroom at the end of the year reading at grade level, but they can most definitely read at a higher level than they did when they entered.
     
  31. Soccer Dad

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    Getting back to the main subject here: in my personal, educational opinion, don't use the textbook's notes.

    Have them read the textbook, but do more than just have them answer questions. I really wish we could have them highlight in texts, but that's not plausible. I'd have them outline. With my students, they roll a dice on the first day of school. If the number is even, they outline every even numbered chapter and the same for odd numbers. I know it's asking a lot for them to do outlines, vocab, and focus questions for every chapter so I make it every other.

    I also have them do annotating (on articles I give them). And I teach them summarizing, Cornell Notes (a personal favorite), etc. All these skills are useful, especially for high school students.
     
  32. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

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    Don't get me wrong. We do those things. I would certainly do more of those things if I taught higher level students. My students are all students who performed 50th percentile or worse on state standardized tests, who did not make an A or B last year, or who simply choose not to have the extra challenge of honors, enriched, or AP courses. So I teach the state-approved curriculum. I follow it very closely, since that is what will be tested. We also do some review of grammar, vocabulary workshop, test prep and writing. I am determined that my students will learn to write before the end of the year.

    I teach a literature survey course. The stories in the textbook are designed to be read and discussed together. I expect students to participate in discussions, read when we read in class, etc. I just don't find it to be a valuable use of time to have them take notes on the lives of authors. Those types of activities are not in the curriculum. We go over the information, usually using a quick Powerpoint, and we refer back to it in our discussion of the story. But that information is not tested, and it is not the main focus of our lessons. We are focused on literary terms, analysis, etc. Why on Earth would I make a Powerpoint if there is one already made for me, that has audio and video clips built in, has short quizzes built in, and goes over the exact things I would put in a presentation anyway? I have better uses of my time.
     

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