Feeling like we don't matter!

Discussion in 'General Education' started by lovebeingteach, Aug 19, 2012.

  1. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Aug 20, 2012

    I don't think that's true on Long Island. I'm pretty sure that all that stuff is aside from the part of the budget that's voted upon.
     
  2. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Aug 20, 2012

    Just wondering where that $ would come from then? Our taxpayers don't vote on our contract, but the costs of faculty and staff salaries and benefits are definitely in the school budget in my area.
     
  3. lucybelle

    lucybelle Connoisseur

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    I used to teach in NC so I know your pain:( I read somewhere once (who knows if it's true) that NC pays their teachers the lowest out of all 50 states.

    That's why I'm marrying someone who I hope makes boatloads of money...:rolleyes:

    No one goes into teaching for the money, but it would be nice to get a raise every once in a while.
     
  4. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Aug 20, 2012

    The following link is a 2010 ranking of teacher salaries adjusted for COLA ( cost of living adjustment) ...it should be very clear that a big factor in any disparity is the geographical costs of living (look at Hawaii..#50, the adjustment really knocks down that salary...)

    http://voices.yahoo.com/state-education-rankings-public-teacher-salaries-6445492.html?cat=4
     
  5. iteachbx

    iteachbx Enthusiast

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    I'm surprised to see NY so low down on the list. The "average" salary really isn't that much more than I'm making. I guess the cost of living is what really brings it down.
     
  6. lucybelle

    lucybelle Connoisseur

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    I was surprised to see NC so high up! Cost of living is quite low, but that average salary seems awful high. Like the OP says they've been teaching for 8 years and still only make $31,000. I don't know any teacher who makes over $50,000 a year and for that "average salary" to be correct there would have to be a bunch of them.
     
  7. a2z

    a2z Virtuoso

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    Aug 20, 2012

    Average salary can be deceiving. It can be skewed low by several factors. First, is the average salary only looking at the base salary and none of the additional increases for other activities that teachers participate in that may be compensated.

    The average salary can be low in a district/state that tends to have a high turnover rate. When a good portion of the workforce is between 1-8 years, the average salary will seem very low. In fact those that stay may actually do very well in terms of salary and benefits (I know that is changing though).

    So, until the terms are defined as to what average salary encompasses and the percentages of teachers at each level, average can be very deceiving.
     
  8. John Lee

    John Lee Groupie

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    Aug 20, 2012

    OP,
    You are echoing a feeling that I've talked about many times on this board... a feeling that new teachers (RIF'd) have been saddled with since this whole thing started. And if misery loves company, you can rest assured that you will feel better in coming years. Let me break the news to you: You are not important.

    Actually, let me take that back. I can't speak for your specific situation. But for me: I am not important. And my contributions are not appreciated. And I am a nobody to my school district. At the same time, I promise you that the teachers in my district who are relatively safe (i.e. on the seniority scale), do not have those same feelings. They feel valued, and they feel important. So when issues come up in the profession, or at the school as they relate to teaching, you now have two distinct groups. It's no longer just "Teachers". It's Teachers, and people like me.

    This is the disenfranchisement of new teachers from the profession. I have a teacher friend who recently sent an e-mail to me, asking me to participate in some school fundraiser (a school I regularly work at). And my initial thought was: "Why? I'm not even a part of the school. I have nothing to do with your school." That point has been made painfully clear, by continually being shoved away. It's a terrible thought (given that I am there every day and I could probably help). But it is what it is. This is a feeling that I've talked about here many times before, and the response? "You're wrong, John Lee." "You don't know what you're talking about."

    I'm not asking for sympathy or pity or anything of the sort. Pity doesn't pay bills, or give me a job. Just trying to add a bit of understanding for the general feeling/situation within the ranks. And to let OP know that misery does love company.
     
  9. tootgravytrain

    tootgravytrain Comrade

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    Well stated John Lee and might I say accurate as hell! If you're thick headed like I am it takes awhile to catch on, but I certainly "get it." And you know what? I actually PREFER it! I don't want or need no limelight and if you do, teaching at a prison certainly isn't the place to try and get it!

    Now I can't say that's 100% across the board. I've had students in the past - when they graduate - say they wouldn't have never "got it" hadn't it been for me, which is only true to the extent that I provide the incentive and opportunity. THEY do the work and THEY pass the tests, so reason says you can't take much credit for someone else's accomplishments.

    But the longer I'm away from public schools, the more I look with either scorn or pity the teachers out there who through whatever means try to be "famous." This isn't about US to begin with!
     
  10. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Aug 20, 2012

    Keep in mind: that's all of NY state. Things are very different a few hours north or west.
     
  11. teach42

    teach42 Comrade

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    Aug 20, 2012

    I meant it on a wider scale and not directly but the public's attitude does have an impact. Take a look at this:
    http://eagnews.org/pennsylvania-taxpayers-demand-pay-freeze-for-teachers/
    And where do you think the money for public schools or the salary for any public employees come from?
     
  12. kpa1b2

    kpa1b2 Aficionado

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    Aug 20, 2012

    I'd be very happy to make even close to the aveage salary! I'm waay below it!
     
  13. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    Aug 20, 2012

    Interesting... they adjust for cost of living, but not for cost of teaching....
     

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