Feedback on 10 Minute Introduction Lesson

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by Nab, May 22, 2017.

  1. Nab

    Nab Companion

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    May 22, 2017

    Two weeks ago, I wrote here about a job interview I had had at a Catholic school in the district over. I didn't think I'd hear back, but I have! I have made it to the top three candidates for the job. The next step is a ten minute introduction lesson, using the state curriculum for English II. On Thursday morning, I'm meeting with the principal, some staff (who will be acting the roles of students), and some recently graduated seniors to perform my lesson. The principal told me she'll be looking at the lesson, how I interact with students, and how engaged students are during the lesson.

    Since the lesson is only ten minutes and technology in the room is limited, I want to do something small. It's an introduction lesson, which I'm taking to mean: this is how you'd introduce a new concept. I looked at our state curriculum website and the first Unit that English II does, is a Unit on writing rhetorical analysis essay. One of the first lessons (I believe it is lesson four) is a 50 minute lesson on Ethos, Pathos, Logos, and logical fallacies.

    Here is my 10 minute idea: Go over the definitions of Ethos, Pathos, and Logos, a if it is a review. Give examples. Have students write down the definitions of all three. Hand out a list of the most common logical fallacies (with definitions) and go over them as a class. In pairs, the students look at six short statements and using the list provided decided which logical fallacy(ies) are being used. Go over as a class. While going over the statements, mark each one as Ethos, Pathos, Logos, or more than one.

    To me, that will take up the whole ten minutes. It also give some direct instruction, student lead discussion, and working in groups. I like it and think it will work well. But, I'd like some feedback.
     
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  3. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    May 22, 2017

    I suspect it will exceed the 10 minute limit. I would be more inclined to use a Do Now that leads into the lesson of your choice. It will be concise, while laying the groundwork/vocab for the bigger picture lesson. Ten minutes will fly by in what feels like a heartbeat.
     
  4. Nab

    Nab Companion

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    May 22, 2017

    I was thinking it might be a bit long. Perhaps I can cut something out to make it more of a Do Now/Bell Ringer activity. I'm just a bit worried, because I don't really have a lot of experience, so this lesson needs to be perfect. I'm wondering what to cut.
     
  5. ktmiller222

    ktmiller222 Cohort

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    May 24, 2017

    Take out them writing the definitions. Have the definitions presented on poster board. That should eliminate a few minutes.
     
  6. Nab

    Nab Companion

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    May 24, 2017

    I've changed the lesson plan. There is a 3 slide PowerPoint that explains the concept. I allow time for a couple of student examples. We go over some of the more common logical fallacies. They work in pairs to complete a handout - four statements and they figure out which logical fallacies are being used. If extra time is needed, they individually make their own statement using a logical fallacy.
     
  7. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    May 24, 2017

    Maybe pick one? Define and have students analyze a short piece for examples?
     
  8. Nab

    Nab Companion

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    May 24, 2017

    I had thought about having them read. However, I decided against it. I want to show interactions and reading may take too long. It's only ten minutes and I'm nervous about the time. I know the principal likes teacher-student interactions and group work, so I'm going to lean toward that.
     

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