Favorite Phonics/Word Work Activities???

Discussion in 'Elementary Education Archives' started by Youngteacher226, Mar 25, 2007.

  1. Youngteacher226

    Youngteacher226 Enthusiast

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    Mar 25, 2007

    I am in the process of boosting up my word work/phonics instruction in my classroom. I am grouping my kids in 3 different groups based on their spelling needs and after evaluating their writing. Anyway, I am collecting phonics activities or word games for my instruction and I would love to hear some of your favorite activities you do in your class. Are there any activities such as sorting, playing with words etc. activities that have proven to be useful to your students? Any websites that stand out to anyone???
    Thanks for your help with this.:)
     
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  3. mswife

    mswife Rookie

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    Mar 25, 2007

    Free Phonics Games To Download

    I have a couple of links for you, but I'm too new to be allowed to post links. Google Adrian Bruce reading games--- they're free to print and use. Also google the site fcrr dot org student center activities There are things to download free in all reading areas. Hope they help.

    adrianbruce.com/reading/games.htm
    fcrr.org/Curriculum/studentCenterActivities23.htm
     
  4. jitterbug2

    jitterbug2 Rookie

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    Mar 27, 2007

    making big words -Tim Rasinski style

    Making big words is a great way to boost vocab but I especially like the way that Tim Rasinski does it. He guides the students through it using clues such as "give me a three letter word that is the opposite of on." Then, they will write that word in a box (they have a worksheet full of boxes for their words). After you write the word, you break it down for phonics using pneumonic devices. For instance, with the "ow" sound we draw bandaids under those letters. For the "aw" sound we write xoxoxo for hugs and kisses. For the "er" sound, we write tiger stripes under it because tigers say "errrr". We put dots under all silent letters. We write hearts next to the ones that don't fit the phonics rules such as the word "one." The list goes on. These are just some examples. Then we bring this into our spelling, our vocabulary, and simply into our reading when they stumble across a big word.

    here is a link about it all:

    http://www.readingonline.org/articles/words/rasinski.html
     

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