Failing Students

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Ms.Holyoke, Dec 22, 2018.

  1. Teacher234

    Teacher234 Cohort

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    Dec 24, 2018

    I understand that my grading policy and school district's policy towards grading in a special class is an opposing view. I can not necessarily control the "Excellent effort=65%" policy. It is a little more complicated than what can be said on an online forum.
    For others to fully understand this, they would have to attend my district's meeting, experience the special education meetings, and explore our grading system. This policy most likely does not make sense to a lot of you, however, this is what I am working with.
    We may alter student grades, but progress is always based on assessments and actual understanding. I teach a special education class.
     
  2. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    Dec 24, 2018

    No. You are wrong. I didn't assume anything about you.
     
  3. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    Dec 24, 2018

    At your school, students get a 65% so long as they try?! Good grief.

    Obviously, you have no control over this (but you should as it is YOUR classroom), but what your school is doing is tantamount to passing out participation awards.

    I imagine a situation going on like this, “Nice try, Jimmy. You’re not even close to the real answer — something like 10,000% error — but you made an honest effort and so you get a 65%! ;)

    I think this is one reason of many for why people in the public arena do not respect the field of education these days. Employers and colleges disagree with this practice and yet we’re (not your fault) doing it why?
     
    Last edited: Dec 24, 2018
  4. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Connoisseur

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    Dec 24, 2018

    Do you teach special education?

    I do not teach sped which makes my situation a little bit different. We were told that if any students on IEPs are failing, there needs to be another progress meeting.
     
    Last edited: Dec 25, 2018
  5. Teacher234

    Teacher234 Cohort

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    Dec 25, 2018

    Well, this interesting grading policy is only for the special education classes. However, middle school and high school teachers occasionally implement this policy for students who are putting forth extraordinary effort, yet still can not pass.
    Plus, numerical grades are not used as progress evidence in a special class. The district wants a report card in all classrooms as a formality. I still have to follow grading requirements and the promotion to next grade policy still is required for the special classes.
     
  6. Teacher234

    Teacher234 Cohort

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    Dec 25, 2018

    Yes, I teach a special class/self-contained setting. Student's academic and behavior progress are indicated by other assessments (NOT numerical grades). I am required to give a 65% for students who are failing, but have put forth extraordinary effort and did what they absolutely could.
     
  7. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

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    We try to stay on kids for missing work to get it all in. Somebody on our team stays after school four days a week for kids who need extra help. We call, email, and send home notes. While we do have kids who fail for progress reports sometimes, we rarely have kids who fail for the grading period, and it is very, very rare for kids to fail for the year.

    In my grade book, I separate work completed with help (classwork) from work completed independently (assessments graded to standard) so parents and kids can see how the kids compare to the standard vs. with a lot of support.
     
  8. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    Oh, this is a special education class. That is very different. I thought you were talking about a general education classroom.
     
  9. Teacher234

    Teacher234 Cohort

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    Dec 25, 2018

    Oh...sorry about that. I apologize for not indicating this sooner. I thought it was known that I was a self-contained teacher. While I do not use numerical grades as evidence of progress, I have other methods that are more personalized for each of my students.
     
    futuremathsprof likes this.
  10. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    Dec 25, 2018

    I probably overlooked that or didn’t read your post thoroughly enough. :)

    This is posted in the General Education section and so I didn’t want to assume that you did.
     
  11. stephenpe

    stephenpe Connoisseur

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    Dec 26, 2018

    My first year teaching (math in 1978) was with the lowest 6-8th graders. I had a kid that missed LOTS of school. When he showed up I gave him the quizzes and tests. I had lots of evidence he knew the material. It was a mastery based program created by two of the math teachers there, I gave him an A because that was his average. The principal called me in and asked me how he did it when all his other grades were F's. He said I had to change it to an F because of how many days he missed. I thought "well hell, this might encourage him to show up more" in my youthful and enthusiastic early twenties.
     

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