Extremely defiant student

Discussion in 'General Education' started by ll1301, Oct 9, 2013.

  1. ll1301

    ll1301 Rookie

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    Oct 9, 2013

    I am a first year teacher and I teach first grade. I have an extremely defiant student in my class. I have issues with this student every single day. She does not complete her work, she wanders around the classroom and bothers other students while they are working. She will not complete her work, and she takes supplies from my cabinet without asking. She cuts pages out of her journal and throws them on the floor. Today, my class was lining up for PE, and she would not join the class in line. She sat on the ground and would not get up. After asking her several times to join the group, she still would not. Another teacher took my class to PE, and I stayed with her trying to talk her into going to PE. I called administration to come get her, and when they arrived, she began kicking, and screaming. It took both the Principal and AP to physically pick her up, and they had to carry her to the front office. She also started running around the classroom, knocking things over and shoving and throwing chairs and desks around. She sat in the office for 2 hours, and then returned to my class after lunch. She still did not do any of her work. I don't know what to do with this child. She is failing every subject because she does not complete her work. I have talked to her mother, and her mother told me, "if you let her be your special helper and help you with tasks in the classroom, maybe she will be more proactive in class." However, I don't believe rewarding her for her poor behavior is the right thing to do. She is on 3 different medications. I am looking for any advice or help in dealing with this student.
     
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  3. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    Oct 9, 2013

    Does this child have a crisis intervention plan? Has anyone done a Functional Behavioral Analysis yet? I know they are a HUGE pain to do, but they really do help you (or her future teachers) in the long run - has she been referred to SPED for behavioral reasons? I have dealt with several kiddos like this (yes, even when I taught 1st), including kids that would throw desks. It definitely is NOT fun. The best advice I can give you is for YOU to stay calm. Keep the other kids out of harms way. Take the scissors away from her and put the other supplies up out of reach, if possible (I always did community supplies in 1st). Use logical consequences (mis-use the scissors, lose the scissors, etc.). Document, document, document (my downfall).
     
  4. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    Oct 9, 2013

    I would pick one behavior and address it. Obviously it is all too much for her.
    I'd probably start with staying at/near her seat. Use tape to mark lines on the floor if necessary. If she needs to get up for any reason, she much raise her hand and wait for permission. Ignore all other behaviors- do not even correct them. Just focus on the one behavior for now. Set up a reward system. For every 15 minutes she stays in her seat, she receives a sticker. Get 15 stickers in one day, get a reward. Something along those lines.
     
  5. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    Oct 9, 2013

    Oh, and document everything!!!
     
  6. donziejo

    donziejo Devotee

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    Oct 9, 2013

    You are getting excellent advice from giraffe. Document, remember if it's not on paper it never happened. Talk to admin and find out the paperwork you need to complete to help get the child services. Hopefully ignoring the behavior except the one you focus on will help. It's hard :(
     
  7. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Oct 9, 2013

    Tape?:confused:
     
  8. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    Sorry. On the floor!! Wow. :blush:
     
  9. donziejo

    donziejo Devotee

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    Oct 9, 2013

    Ha, I knew what you meant!!!!
     
  10. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    Oct 9, 2013

    Sounds like she runs all over mom (& maybe dad too) at home & we all know how hard poor parental skills are for the teacher when the kid's at school. Mom needs to give her some good butt spankings! If she can't be handled in 1st grade, I shudder to think how she'll be each year she gets older! Back in my long-term subbing days, I had a girl similar to this, but not quite as bad. The aide in the class said she's spoiled at home. Her mother should have spanked her butt too. :mad:
     
  11. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Oct 9, 2013

    Oh my. :(There are MUCH better ways to manage children's behavior than 'butt spanking'.


    Thanks for clarifying...I have seen news stories of kids taped in their chairs...:eek: I thought you were kidding!:haha:
     
  12. a2z

    a2z Virtuoso

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    Oct 10, 2013

    Did anyone miss the fact that this kid is on 3 meds? This isn't the typical student.

    OP, you might not want to reward bad behavior, but having the child help may very well be a way to prevent bad behavior. Sure you want this child to act like the average kid, but any child on 3 meds (I assume you are applying for behavioral issues, not for allergies and reflux), you aren't dealing with the typical kid that will respond to most traditional methods of consequences.

    Does this child already have an IEP? If not, document. Let her fail because her behavior is impacting her education. Get the process started for special education identification.
     
    Last edited: Oct 10, 2013
  13. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    Oct 10, 2013

    OP, did you add that sentence in later about her being on 3 meds? I didn't notice that at first. An occasional spanking done by the parent at home proably still wouldn't hurt.
     
  14. Pisces_Fish

    Pisces_Fish Fanatic

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    Oct 10, 2013

    Can you get one of those inflatable wiggle disks? I don't know what they're called, maybe someone knows. It helps my behavior student sit in his seat longer than without it. It's a start...
     
  15. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Spanking does hurt...more than just physically.
     
  16. EMonkey

    EMonkey Connoisseur

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    Oct 11, 2013

    Document behavior. If the child has medical issues (three meds implies that) start the paperwork for the process to Special Ed. In my state we start with documentation and modification, then a Student Success Team meeting. Then follow through with the plans and see how the modifications worked. Then the next step is another SST which can put into place testing for an IEP.

    I agree with giraffe to focus on one behavior the one that is the either the most feasible to change or the most pressing to try and change. Ignore all other behaviors as far as how you interact with her-definitely document them.

    I also think that one of the biggest things is you figuring out what you like about the child and trying to make a connection with the child. It builds trust and social capital between you and her which is very important in managing difficult kids.

    Also, if mom gave you a suggestion, put it to use. She is basing it on years of working with her hard to work with child. Even if you have the little one by your side helping you turn pages in the big book or whatever the whole class ends up being the winners if she is not crashing constantly. Have it as a distraction before she crashes if possible. Load her down with a pile of books and send her as a messenger to another class (if she is not a runner). Have her help by picking up messes. Have her be the chair tucker, paper straightener, broom sweeper, box carrier, pencil finder, pen returner... just make sure the other children also participate. If you don't make use of mom's suggestion when you have an SST, mom might say "how did my suggestion work?" if you reply "I don't use it." You will be back at square one with the directive from the principal, psychologist, and Resource Specialist to make use of the idea and see if it works.
     
  17. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    Oct 11, 2013

    It definitely sounds like documentation followed by a sped referral is needed. She reminds me of one of my highest-needs sped students.

    The hardest thing you'll have to do is accept that the rewards/consequences that she receives will have to be different than what the other kids get. She is not like them, and using those same rewards/consequences will not work for her. I find this is the hardest part for my student's classroom teacher to accept.

    Document everything that occurs. It will be time-consuming, but it's the only way to get the girl the help she needs. Ask your sped teachers what you can do to help this girl and/or get her referred.
     
  18. ecteach

    ecteach Groupie

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    Oct 12, 2013

    Positive, positive, positive. This child does not react to punishment. It pleases her. She wants attention, and will take it any way it comes. Make a book for her called the "Positive Behavior Book." Put a nice picture of her on the front of it. Then every SINGLE time she does something good (and there are times) write it in her book. Put the date and the time that she did exhibited the teacher pleasing behavior. Then, at the end of every day let her take it home and have her mother sign it.


    THEN------You use the book to reason with her. When she starts acting out show her the book. Find specific examples of times when she DID NOT act like that. For example, "Look Sally, on October 4 you went to P.E. with no trouble. I was so proud of you for that. But now I'm concerned, because I know that it's not that you CAN'T go to P.E., I know that it's that you don't WANT to go to P.E. If you work with me and go ahead to P.E., I will talk with you for 2 minutes when you get back about why you didn't want to go." -OR- "Look, Sally, on October 4, you sat in your seat for 10 whole minutes. When you did that I was able to teach my class, and I was so proud of you. Now you're running around the room making duck sounds, and you haven't even been in your seat for 30 seconds. So, I know that you CAN sit in your seat if you WANT to. If you sit down for the rest of this lesson, I will let you water the plants so you can get some exercise."

    I know your frustration. I have 10 self-contained special ed students, and as you can imagine I've had some real behavior issues to deal with. This book will work wonders. It takes some extra work, but the benefit will be worth the work.

    *Note* You NEVER put anything negative in the positive behavior book. NEVER!
     
  19. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    Oct 12, 2013

    I REALLY like this idea! I think I might use it for one of my students. Thanks for sharing!!
     
  20. ecteach

    ecteach Groupie

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    The special ed referral might be a good idea, but remember that this process takes time, and SOMEONE still has to deal with this child if she does qualify for special ed services. SOMEONE will eventually have to put some behavioral interventions into place to help change this behavior. So, why not you? :) YOU CAN DO IT!!! :)
     
  21. ecteach

    ecteach Groupie

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    Oct 12, 2013

    You are very welcome.
     

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