extra credit...to give, or not to give

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by sundrop, Oct 4, 2007.

  1. sundrop

    sundrop Cohort

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    Oct 4, 2007

    My daughter is a freshman in high school this year. I recently went to back to school night and was surprised to hear all of the teachers were very quick to list all of the ways that students can earn extra credit. Almost as if they felt they needed to appease the parents. Worse yet, the extra credit was things like bringing in a box of tissues, cans of food for ECHO ( or $$ if you don't want to lug cans around), etc... I teach elementary school and don't really offer extra credit. I work with students on a one-on-one basis when they do poorly on an assignment. I go over the concept with them again and might assign more work similar to the original assignment. If they do this I will adjust their score accordingly.

    I am wondering if you give extra credit. What are your thoughts on this?
     
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  3. INteacher

    INteacher Aficionado

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    Oct 4, 2007

    I do assign extra credit, but it is work that pertains to the subject matter that we are studying. Usually it requires a more indepth look/report at something we are studying. I do not allow any students that have missing assignments to do extra credit. My reason for allowing extra credit in high school is that so many of my students are juggling jobs, sports, clubs ect... that every now and then they mess up on a test, assignment project. Most of my extra credit work goes to students on academic tracks try to bring up an A- to an A, or B+ to an A-.
     
  4. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Oct 4, 2007

    I give 4 points extra credit on every test. (Today's questions for my Algebra I kids: When and why is our next day off? Answer: Monday, Oct 8-- Columbus Day. I might add that these are my slower kids-- tomorrow's honors test will have a much more difficult question. Last test, I had them add the integers from 1 to 100.)

    It makes no real difference in their grades. (The girl who went from a 13 to a 17 is still failing by a mile.) But it makes them feel better and keeps them busy thinking as their friends finish up the test.
     
  5. sue35

    sue35 Habitué

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    Oct 4, 2007

    I provide extra credit both related to the subject (Science) and not related. I have questions on each test related to the school, and also brain teaser sheets that they can fill out for extra credit. I also have an extra credit lab a quarter. The way I see it, is that some people can not understand Science no matter how hard they try and therefore I want to give them the chance to raise their grade even if they aren't Science geniuses
     
  6. mstemple05

    mstemple05 Cohort

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    Oct 5, 2007

    I know sometimes for things like back to school night and other things parents would come to would be offered as extra credit. Kind of a way to get kids to get their parents there. My old job did it, haven't seen it.

    I like your idea Alice. Having extra credit be fun things. I do sometimes think extra credit should pertain to the content area-just harder-but then sometimes if it's a harder, bigger test the e.c. could be just like what alice said. I think i will definitely steal that idea, asking questions and such. Cool beans.

    I don't give e.c. because i found that the kids only concern themselves with the e.c. "did you put extra credit on there?" "is there a re-take?" They get so much more concerned with the bonus that sometimes they don't even try. And then i don't want to say hey you don't have to try but i'll give you a couple of points for telling me something else.. I don't know. This is definitely a "to each his own" situation. If it works for you and your kids take advantage responsibly, then go for it..
     
  7. Mrs. R.

    Mrs. R. Connoisseur

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    Oct 5, 2007

    I put questions similar to Alice's on many of my tests, mostly as something fun at the end. I also use extra credit slips as rewards in my class. Kids earn those instead of candy when they do something unexpected or we have a drawing of some sort (vocab detective - the kids find their vocab words in a real world usage) or play review games. They LOVE getting these, and really, they don't boost the grade all that much.
     
  8. childcare teach

    childcare teach Comrade

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    Oct 5, 2007

    My son is in sixth grade and his ss teacher gives extra creidt by asking the class a triva question about the topic they are doing and if they get it right it goes on the homework grade . This helps the children like mine who do bad on test but do better other ways.
     
  9. silverspoon65

    silverspoon65 Enthusiast

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    Oct 5, 2007

    I think anything put in the gradebook should pertain to the course's curriculum. Period.

    I do give extra credit, but it is typically a challenge and/or something that I would have liked to do as a class, but it just wasn't possible, like today, for example, when I offered extra credit for students to go see a play and do an assignment related to what we are currently reading in class.

    I also do not give extra credit to student who are missing assignments - only to students who have tried hard to turn everything in and need a little boost. Which, like I said, they have to earn.

    I have a problem with people giving unrelated extra credit because the student just isn't good at that subject. If a kid just isn't good at English then the kid just doesn't get a good grade. It doesn't mean the kid is a bad person, it just means he or she got a D in English. I also think to distinguish a D or F for a kid who failed but tried and a kid who failed and didn't do anything, we should start giving I's for students who didn't do the work.

    Sorry, a little off topic, but it related to reasons why some people give extra credit.
     

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