Explain Sub Tubs

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by DrivingPigeon, Aug 1, 2013.

  1. DrivingPigeon

    DrivingPigeon Phenom

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2008
    Messages:
    4,212
    Likes Received:
    8

    Aug 1, 2013

    I don't really understand the concept of a "Sub Tub." From my understanding, they are actual tubs that contain activities for a substitute teacher to do. I don't really understand the concept...Don't people have daily lesson plans? When I have a sub, s/he continues to do the work that I am doing in the classroom, so it would be a lot of work to keep designing a tub of activities that align with our current units of study. Or is the tub just a fun place to leave all of the materials for the sub to find?

    I don't have separate "emergency plans," because my regular plans are always on my desk, and the materials are always on the counter in a designated bin. My kids know our routines, so if I ever had an emergency, the sub would just come in and teach my regular plans.

    I could be way off here, but it just seems like another cute trendy teacher thing...? Maybe helpful for some, but I'm confused.
     
  2.  
  3. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2007
    Messages:
    14,606
    Likes Received:
    2,714

    Aug 1, 2013

    I have a sub tub. It contains my emergency plans, my emergency folder (with rosters, etc.), a binder with school and classroom info, a copy of all my textbooks, and maybe a few other things. It's just a way of keeping all that stuff together in once place for a sub so that they don't have to go running around looking for all of it. You'd be surprised at how many people don't think to look at the bookshelf behind the teacher desk for copies of the textbook when there isn't a copy on the desk....
     
  4. bison

    bison Habitué

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2012
    Messages:
    874
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 1, 2013

    As a para, I see subs come and go regularly. The days where the teacher is out and there are good plans and other crucial info laid out for the sub go SO MUCH more smoothly for everyone involved. A lot of regular plans make no sense to anyone but the teacher. It works for them, but not for someone who has never been in their room before. I've stood there with subs more than a few times trying to figure out what vague one or two sentence plans mean and where materials are. Not everyone is organized with copies and materials, and some teachers also take their plans home. Even sub plans for planned absences can be frustratingly vague.

    I usually hear of a binder rather than tub but it will contain a class list, bell schedule, important medical needs like severe allergies, emergency info, class procedures for important things like lunch or attendance, emergency plans in case the teacher is out unexpectedly (usually review), lists of pull-out schedules for certain kids, and anything else that might be important. It's usually not cutesie, just functional. I once witnessed a day where a shy little one wet themselves because the sub didn't know they were making the bathroom signal. I was out of the room working with a small group and only returned when it was too late. No one's fault, really, but they could have been prepared.

    If you search on Pinterest, there are tons of examples and templates and stuff on various blogs.
     
  5. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2005
    Messages:
    4,376
    Likes Received:
    809

    Aug 1, 2013

    Sub tubs are for emergencies -- you don't make it to school with your lesson plans, so in the tub you will find schedules, roster, copies of activities, etc.

    We are required to have 3 days worth of emergency plans that could be used in case we aren't able to get to work with lesson plans (like being hospitalized over the weekend, or a car accident, or something like that.)
     
  6. KinderCowgirl

    KinderCowgirl Phenom

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2006
    Messages:
    4,858
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 1, 2013

    Like Bison said, I think sometimes even if you have lesson plans-the subs won't necessarily be able to find the materials needed to complete them. I got a very direct note from a sub last year that she didn't know the songs I had on there (the kids did but she said she didn't trust them), she didn't want to use the Smartboard (our math calendar routine is done on there), couldn't find the paper, didn't know which journals they were supposed to write in. In my sub tub I have a generic read-aloud, with generic activities all put together so any sub should be able to fill the day.
     
  7. HistoryVA

    HistoryVA Devotee

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2013
    Messages:
    1,016
    Likes Received:
    38

    Aug 1, 2013

    I think the idea is that even if you have your lessons planned in advance for scheduled absences, you never know when you're going to have an emergency and be out for multiple days. A Sub Tub (although I'm HS, so I use a binder) would have multiple emergency ideas that a sub could use for a few days until a LTS sub or you can get in.

    I don't allow subs to teach my content (although obv I'd have to if I were out for multiple days), so my binder has review activities that can be used at any time with whatever the kids have done last. It's been really helpful to have.
     
  8. Ted

    Ted Habitué

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2006
    Messages:
    836
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 1, 2013

    I have a Sub Tub that is kept under my desk. I let my students know it's there in the event that I couldn't get in to create sub plans. With the Internet, it's a bit easier since my lessons are on my class web page and I can simply type something up from home and email it to the secretaries who are kind enough to print it out for the substitute teacher.

    That being said, it's still nice to have in the event I can't do the aforementioned. I don't think it's just a cutesy trend... I think, at least for me, it's useful.
     
  9. Curiouscat

    Curiouscat Comrade

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2011
    Messages:
    467
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 1, 2013

    I have a sub tub with generic activities. The reason is because many of my lessons involve using the computer, smart board, etc. Our subs are not allowed/able to use the school computers in any way, shape, or form. If I have an unforeseen absence, the sub would have a difficult time doing my job. I live 30 minutes away, so I am not running in to rewrite plans for a sub.
    Yes, know I could email a coworker with different plans, but I don't think well in that type of circumstance.
     
  10. geoteacher

    geoteacher Devotee

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2011
    Messages:
    1,033
    Likes Received:
    237

    Aug 1, 2013

    It absolutely is not a cute trend. My administration requires that I have three days of emergency plan available at all times. I also have readily accessible daily lesson plans - both online and on my desk, but, as others have said, emergencies do happen. Isn't it better to have a little extra - just in case a sub needs it?
     
  11. MissScrimmage

    MissScrimmage Aficionado

    Joined:
    May 29, 2007
    Messages:
    3,061
    Likes Received:
    538

    Aug 1, 2013

    Agreed. My admin 'strongly encouraged' us all to have emergency plans in the event that we can't get plans to school for a sub. I have a tub labelled "Emergency Sub Plans" and I've shown my regular subs where it is. Inside is a folder for every subject with a variety of activities that the sub can choose from. I also have a "General Info" folder that contains a class list and a general outline for the day.
     
  12. BumbleB

    BumbleB Habitué

    Joined:
    May 10, 2011
    Messages:
    917
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 1, 2013

    I keep my sub plans in a binder. I include a detailed bell schedule, the daily plans, a list of helpful students, pertinent medical information (student allergies/conditions), blank rosters, emergency procedures, a copy of my syllabus and "time fillers" in case the lessons I provide aren't sufficient.

    I've always had really good feedback from subs about my binder. Many of them tell me that they love to sub for me because I provide them with such detailed information.
     
  13. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2001
    Messages:
    24,959
    Likes Received:
    2,116

    Aug 1, 2013

    I usually am only out for PD reasons or planned personal days in which case I leave plans (tend to overplay or subs) and my sub folder which has some 'in case you run out of things to do' sponge kinds of activities. M team is GREAT about checking in On subs and filling in with stuff if needed.
     
  14. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2010
    Messages:
    4,964
    Likes Received:
    1,157

    Aug 1, 2013

    I also think sub tubs are for emergency, and I thin they're more suitable for elementary with all the manipulatives, small books and other items used in those grades. I have only seen this once when I subbed for a lower grade, and there were many, many things in there, just in case. The teacher left a lesson plan, and some of the things I had to use were in the tub, but there were other activities in there just in case.

    For middle or high school I think binders are better, but if someone wants to use a tub based on preference, that's their choice of course.
     
  15. bek3

    bek3 Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2011
    Messages:
    62
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 1, 2013

    I feel the same way! I do not have emergency sub plans or a sub tub. I don't know of anyone in my building who does. I know emergencies can happen at any time. Teachers in my building either come in way early in the morning to prep for a sub or email sub plans and have a coworker print it out and gather materials. (This is only in the event of an emergency which happens maybe once a year, if that.) Last year my grade level partner went into labor a couple of weeks early. That morning (actually that whole week) I got everything together for the sub. It really was no big deal. No sub plans were left, but I made everything 'sub friendly' based off of the regular plans. I, personally, would feel like I lost a whole day (or two or three) if they just worked on review type activities. I'd rather have my class continue right where we left off.
     
  16. DrivingPigeon

    DrivingPigeon Phenom

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2008
    Messages:
    4,212
    Likes Received:
    8

    Aug 1, 2013

    Oh, I definitely don't think that having emergency sub plans is a cutsie thing!

    We are required to have a sub folder, which contains basic information, and a few activities for emergencies. Most of the time my subs just do what I was going to do anyway. I'd like to think that my class pretty much runs itself, so I don't really plan anything different for subs. My plans are on my desk every day, and I have daily baskets that contain teaching materials for each day of the week. I guess I've just never had a problem, so I don't see a need.

    I guess it just depends on which grade level you teach, what your school requires, and what you're comfortable with.
     
  17. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2007
    Messages:
    14,606
    Likes Received:
    2,714

    Aug 1, 2013

    I guess you don't need emergency plans if you never have an emergency where you are in some way incapacitated and can't come to school or email, or if your coworkers know your material well enough to plan for you.

    I'm the only one who teaches my content. My whole department is "singletons", so we can't plan for each other except in a very general way.

    I certainly don't prefer to "lose a day" when I'm out, but I also don't want to put my coworkers out by asking them to do my job for me when it's just so easy to prepare 5 or 10 generic, anytime lessons.
     
  18. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2007
    Messages:
    14,606
    Likes Received:
    2,714

    Aug 1, 2013

    I think it's really just a matter of packaging. You have all the stuff there on your desk at all times. I am not that together and my desk is small, so I keep all that stuff in a milk crate. Same stuff, different package.
     
  19. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2007
    Messages:
    5,276
    Likes Received:
    1

    Aug 1, 2013

    I don't know about the district, but my P requires some form of emergency Sub plans - be it in a binder or a tub. I have a clear lidded plastic box with a large label that says "SUB TUB." In it are blank grade sheets (for conduct and attendance only), rosters, seating charts, parent contact info, emergency medical info, rules and procedures. I also have about 20 pages of generic activities that can be done around picture books that I also place in the tub.

    When I know in advance that I will be absent, I leave extremely detailed plans that hopefully address anything the sub could possibly need to know. I also leave student work, stacked and labeled by subject. I leave detailed info on how to operate the SmartBoard, but I don't let the kids have computer rotations during my absence.

    That being said, sometimes we get bad or uneducated subs who (1) don't read well or (2) just can't operate the equipment or follow directions. Others simply don't care. If I am incapacitated enough that I cannot make it to school with "real" sub plans, then hopefully anyone with a heartbeat can follow my "sub tub" plans.
     
  20. bek3

    bek3 Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2011
    Messages:
    62
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 1, 2013

    I guess that's one of the benefits of elementary. Grade level teams teach the same content at about the same time with the same materials (for the most part). To each his own... :)
     
  21. geoteacher

    geoteacher Devotee

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2011
    Messages:
    1,033
    Likes Received:
    237

    Aug 1, 2013

    I couldn't have said it better. This is exactly my situation also.
     
  22. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2005
    Messages:
    6,067
    Likes Received:
    1,535

    Aug 1, 2013

    This is almost mine, exactly.

    I teach from a curriculum map, a list of learning targets, and random notes. Nobody could pick up and go from that. Plus, many parts are my own stories. I need to write out detailed plans.

    I have emergency plans for up to a month. They are related to content, but generic enough for kids to do independently. I can work them into the unit when I get back.

    People say they don't need to plan for emergencies because a colleague can do it or they have never had emergencies. Well . . . not a great idea. I will cover for colleagues in emergencies, but it's a gamble. What if that person is unavailable? Twice I ended up in the ER for emergency surgery. No way to prepare plans. One was before Internet was available in my town. Another was post Internet, but before WiFi. No way to email from a hospital. More recently my dad was hospitalized in the middle of the night. Once last year a colleague emailed her plans to her partner, but the email was down statewide.

    I'd rather be overly prepared.
     
  23. iteachbx

    iteachbx Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2011
    Messages:
    2,096
    Likes Received:
    2

    Aug 2, 2013

    There's not a single substitute in my building that I would trust teaching my daily lesson plans. If my co-teacher and I are both going to be out (extremely rare, usually happens once a year for a conference) we put together review work for the subs to do with the class. I've definitely learned to let go of certain things but there's no way I'd trust a substitute to teach a lesson the same way I would and get the same results. I'm not trying to say anything bad about substitutes because I was one once too, but to come into the classroom for one day, not knowing the students, maybe not experience with the grade level/curriculum I can't expect them to really teach something the same way I would- even with plans.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

Total: 174 (members: 0, guests: 158, robots: 16)
test