Exit Tickets

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by KinderCowgirl, Jun 8, 2010.

  1. KinderCowgirl

    KinderCowgirl Phenom

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    Jun 8, 2010

    Does anyone do anything interesting for an exit ticket?

    I really want my kids to be better at articulating something they learned each day. Last year I had a column in their daily folder-I would write their responses in the beginning of the year and they would write their own in the second half. They are all capable of writing a sentence-but not very good at coming up with a specific concept. Like they will just say "math". Any fun formats to use that would help require them to have better answers?
     
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  3. teacherpippi

    teacherpippi Habitué

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    Jun 8, 2010

    A few thoughts-
    Have you modeled the answers you want vs. answers that are not what you're looking for?

    What about partnering them up and making sure their partner "checks them off" for an answer Mrs. KinderCowgirl would want.

    Have you stopped them after each lesson and talked about the things they've learned? Even my first and second graders have a hard time really telling what they have learned by the end of the day- to their brains they've already learned it and they struggle with being able to tell what was "new" today.
     
  4. jday129

    jday129 Comrade

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    Do you post objectives before each lesson? Research suggests that telling students (oral and in print) what they are trying to learn before you begin a lesson helps struggling learners. I have a pocket chart where I post the objectives, it might say something like "Good writers plan their stories on their fingers" or "Good readers.... " etc.
    If you do this then you could refer them back to the objectives as they write what they learned. Their sentence could be "Today I used my fingers to plan out my story."
     
  5. Irma

    Irma Companion

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    Jun 8, 2010

    An great informal exit ticket is asking a question when students are exiting the classroom- say it's a math fact or spelling a DOLCH word or something (I noticed you're kdg). It could even be a quick question/answer session at the beg/end of your lesson with clappers or response cards.
     
  6. KinderCowgirl

    KinderCowgirl Phenom

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    Thank you so much for your responses!

    I do review with a closure to most activities asking them to kind of restate what they've learned in some way. The objectives are also posted (I even use pictures) and refer to them often. It just seems like pinpointing something specific is harder for their little brains than just a general thing they know we do every day-we read our chapter book, we learned how to read.

    I had a lot of staff children in my class this past year and I usually heard the conversation after school - what did you learn today? and the response from the child as "nothing". Where if I gave them some prompts-what did you learn in reading? Didn't we make a project-what did you learn from that? They could answer no problem.

    And I know it's hard because they are little but it's something I really want to work on with them this year-being able to reflect on what and how they are learning, building on what they already know.
     
  7. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    Jun 8, 2010

    I've never heard of an exit ticket. I'm guessing from these responses that it may be a question you ask at the end of the lesson to gauge mastery? Or am I completely off base?
     
  8. KinderCowgirl

    KinderCowgirl Phenom

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    Swansong-more at the end of the day-their "ticket" to leave for the day is being able to show something they learned. I'm just learning about them myself but something I want to start to integrate next year. I think if I do it in a concrete format-on paper, that I'll get a much better range of answers.
     
  9. Missy99

    Missy99 Connoisseur

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    Jun 8, 2010

    I was interested in learning more about exit tickets, too, as I had never heard anything by that name before. I have asked the students to answer questions before they could leave the room at lunch or when they were leaving for the day, as a sort of "spiraling" exercise.

    I did find this thread on exit tickets here at A to Z:
    http://forums.atozteacherstuff.com/showthread.php?t=54963

    Hope this helps -- I know I am going to try it!
     
  10. CFClassroom

    CFClassroom Connoisseur

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    Jun 8, 2010

    It's not an exit ticket, but I provide my families with what I call, "Table Talk Topics." The idea is that it gives them something to discuss at dinner. I try to make the questions something that requires thought and conversation and not a one word answer. Some examples include:

    Tell me what you learned about the Mayflower today.
    Describe the 3D solid you built in math.
    Explain how you played the Survivor game.
     
  11. KinderCowgirl

    KinderCowgirl Phenom

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    Jun 8, 2010

    Thanks Missy and Recess! I read about them in that "Teach Like a Champion" book-but those examples were more geared to the older kids. I also remember hearing the term in management pd's our district used to subscribe to.

    I didn't think to look it up in the forum already-I'll read through those ideas. And I love the idea of Table Talk Topics-I think my parents would like that too!
     
  12. Teacher Chele

    Teacher Chele Habitué

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    I love your idea iheartrecess. Did you run it off each day or did the kiddos copy it down?

    I have also seen Two Stars and A Wish where the kids write down two thigns they learned and something else they would like to know about what they learned.
     
  13. Auter12

    Auter12 Comrade

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    Jun 8, 2010

    This can be done at any time of the day - ie. before freetime, lunch, recess, etc. It is usually most time efficient at the end of the day, though.
     

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