Excessive talkers!

Discussion in 'General Education Archives' started by leslye, Jul 28, 2005.

  1. leslye

    leslye Rookie

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    Jul 28, 2005

    How do you handle kids that talk at inappropriate times? You know, the ones that do it day in and day out? I had one student last year that I tried everything with, but nothing worked! He did other things, but his talking was the one thing I couldn't deter. Trips to the principal's office, contacting his parents numerous times, (even met with his mom twice, once in the principal's office and once with the counselor). I tried talking to him several times on a one-on-one basis to get to the root of the actual problem, but he just wouldn't open up to me like my other kids would. Any and all advice is greatly appreciated since I'm getting ready to start my second year and want to be clear on all my expectations from the get-go!

    Thanks!
     
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  3. Nisey

    Nisey Companion

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    Jul 28, 2005

    Is he just calling out or is he talking when you or other students are talking? I know one teacher that would spell the child's name each time be called out. For example if the child's name was Craig, the first time he called out she would write "c" then the next he spoke out of turn she would write "r" and so on. Once his whole name was on the board he owed her time at recess or lunch or whatever.
    For the kids that I had that would call out I would give a reminder to raise their hand. If the student was just visiting I would go over and say right now is listening time, visiting time happens at recess or during free time, but definately not right now.
    I don't know if these were the answers you were looking for.
     
  4. Ms.Jasztal

    Ms.Jasztal Maven

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    Jul 28, 2005

    I have a Scholar Dollar system as well as a tally system. The tally system gives a $5 bonus in Scholar Dollars for every wonderful act while it deletes $5 for everyone who does something to act out of turn. It is a quick warning for before the student's name actually makes it on the board... and normally my students stopped when they realized dollars were being deleted from their "bank account". The main thing is that I list more positive acts than negative ones (I believe I had 8 categories where they could be given bonus Scholar Dollars while I had 4 where they could lose the money). It helped for the most part.

    I also had an excessive talker last year, but in a different way. He loved making animal sounds. He was especially good at making some dead parakeet sound. On our St. Augustine field trip, he sang "Ba-da-da-da-da... I'm loving it" about 56 times. Tears of joy run down my face thinking about my experiences with this child... because I know he was like that and I couldn't change him. I didn't condemn him for being humorous... because in all right, he had a shining sense of humor. I let him know that I accepted him because some people in the past, I heard, condemned him into a black hole. I think that by the end of the year, his confidence improved, and he really enjoyed being in my classroom. Now he's on my journalism staff, and will probably be that gregarious photojournalist that does an incredible job because he has so much to offer everyone. If I handled him differently, though, if I told him all the time to be quiet, then he may not have enjoyed fourth grade as much... and his memories may have been completely different in the long run. I make it an effort to enjoy these types of children because sometimes that makes the entire experience better.
     
  5. leslye

    leslye Rookie

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    Jul 28, 2005

    I know that this particular child was doing it for attention with what the counselor found out talking to him. (His mom works a lot and she's never home when he's there. His two teenage brothers are his keepers.) He would call out without raising his hand, disrupt others during instruction, and constantly be at my desk when I was there. I tried feverishly to give him positive attention in hopes he would do better, but nothing seemed to work. I know he liked hugs, but towards the end of the year he wanted nothing to do with them because he thought it would make him look "baby-ish" in front of the others. He also became rude and physical with others and I was able to get a handle on that, but not the talking. I taught 3rd grade last year and am moving to 4th this year. I don't know what I'll do if I get him again! I love the little guy, but can't get anything done with his disruptive behavior. I worried about him constantly because I know deep down he's a good kid.

    I have a ticket system I use, but I don't take any away unless it's for an unscheduled bathroom break. Should I start "charging" for disruptive behavior?
     
  6. Nisey

    Nisey Companion

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    Jul 28, 2005

    Ms. J:
    How did you deal with all the noises that he made? I will be getting a student like that and the last time I taught him those noises drove myslef and all the other students absolutely nuts! Everyone got frustrated with him, sometimes we could ignore the noises but I've learned that the noises have not gotten any better. Strategies?
     
  7. mmis

    mmis Companion

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    Aug 2, 2005

    excessive talkers

    Sometimes students at this age will start to be more of a problem if they feel isolated by the class. If he feels as though he's always in trouble, he'll probably act worse and get in more trouble. It then may lead to other behavior issues besides talking out.
    I try and make sure that I have plenty of activities that encourage talking throughout the day-lots of small group and buddy work. I never expect my students to sit still and be quiet for more than 20 minutes at a time- hey, when we have faculty mtgs, teachers can't be quiet for that long!!
    I've also found that giving particular students a special project keeps them involved in classwork. I've assigned a topic (one that he was interested in -like snakes) to a child and told him to research it and then teach a lesson to the class when finished (I gave him guidelines to follow). This made him feel important, kept him involved in learning, and gave him a chance to get and talk in a positive way. You could always try these projects with a buddy and then he can talk to the buddy while working on the project and not come interrupt your time with other students. If other students become interested in teaching their own projects, just assign one to them too!
    I was always a talker in school. I can remember and appreciate those teachers who tried to help me use my talking in a positive way!
     
  8. MelissainGA

    MelissainGA Groupie

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    Aug 2, 2005

    Wish I knew the answer because I have one that in just 3 days I have nicknamed "the mouth of the south", I swear I don't think he even stops to take a breath. Today I got his attention when I moved his behavior card the 3rd step and he lost 1/2 his recess time. I hate being the "mean teacher" though, it goes against my nature. Suggestions ?
     
  9. leslye

    leslye Rookie

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    Aug 6, 2005

    Thanks, MMIS!

    I like your suggestions and will use more partner/group projects this year. I will also start a community circle for discussing topics that make students feel more a part of the class and was thinking about have a question/suggestion box for things to discuss in the circle. No names mentioned so they feel comfortable in expressing their feelings anonymously. Anyone ever tried something like this?
     
  10. DotyMath

    DotyMath Rookie

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    Aug 7, 2005

    What about older kids?

    I teach middle school level students - 7th and 8th grade. I have an awful problem with one student. NOTHING has worked to get him not to yell out during class. He is a repeater and in constant need of attention at any cost (no attention at home - mom just got out of jail, dad doesnt want him, and grandma died not too long ago). I have tried ignoring him, but he just gets louder. I have tried giving him a piece of paper and having him write down his questions and hold them up, but he gets tired of this quickly and his handwriting isn't all that great. One teacher allowed him one question an hour per day - I tried it, but didn't go over well; he resented that I used someone else's ideas and then resorted to "huff and puff" and pout, and get louder and more annoying. I have tried giving him something else to do to keep him occupied, but then he complains LOUDLY about no one else having to do all the work. I have tried sending him on 'special errands', but he winds up getting into trouble on the way. He has seen the guidance counselor and the principal on many occasions, but of course this does nothing to alter his behavior. The other students in the same class with him are also fed up with his behavior and are constantly asking me to make Cody shut up. I am going to have him AGAIN this year, in addition to his younger sister in the same class. :eek: I want to be more prepared on how to deal with him and start from the beginning of the school year. Any ideas? Suggestions?
    Does any one else have this problem, or is this an isolated and unusual one?
    :thanks:
     
  11. Mrs. West

    Mrs. West Rookie

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    Aug 7, 2005

    Have you thought about having him sit right next to you during class? If you don't want to make it obvious that you are doing it, re-arrange the desks so one just happens to end up in a spot right next to you. Then make up a seating chart that requires the excessive talker to sit right there.

    After the first offense this year talk with him about how you expect him to show respect to the other students and their class time. If he needs to talk with you and ask you lots of questions, he can do it quietly when you are through talking to the class.

    I would also place his sister as far away from him as possible. :)
     
  12. DotyMath

    DotyMath Rookie

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    Aug 8, 2005

    I usually use the overhead projector most of the class period (since I teach science and math). Otherwise I am all over the room. Having him right next to me would work in theory, but there really isn't one place that is right next to me. Yes, his sister will be as far away as possible. :) She doesn't require as much individual attention from me, but she is a talker (aren't most 7th and 8th grade girls?:))
    Thanks for the idea!
     

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