Exam reviews

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by Camel13, Jan 2, 2018.

  1. Camel13

    Camel13 Companion

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    Jan 2, 2018

    First year teacher here. I spent my entire break creating semester exams and reviews for the five subjects I teach, and now I am trying to figure out some ways to spice up the review packets. In general we are looking at 6-7 pages of questions that students might need to look up in their texts and write out responses. My exams are mostly all multiple choice, same concepts. My students' luck with my tests and previous reviews have not been so great this year. There is a mix of lazyness ( not completing reviews, or studying) and just not seeming to know how to study. I have required students to turn in a completed packet in order to take a test. This has literally pushed back half the class getting the test done by a week ( the ones that have to finish do so in a lunch working hour we have).

    For the exam I am saying 10 points are added to the exam grade if they hand in a completed and correctly answered packet. Beyond this, are there some learning games that we could play to make this studying part more engaging? I have done Jeopardy before, but it certainly takes a lot of time on my part to create the Q/A. Any other fun ways to practice? I have Chemistry, Biology, physical science in 9 th grade, Earth science and 7 th grade Life science.
     
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  3. JimG

    JimG Comrade

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    Jan 2, 2018

    Play Jeopardy, but come up with questions on the spot or out of the book, based on category and point value.

    Heather Hart’s “Math Poker” (you could call it Science Poker). Students start with 100 “dollars” and bet before each question. You present a question. If right, they gain their wager; if wrong, they lose their wager. Set up in three columns on individual score sheets from left to right: wager, work/answer, balance.

    Teacher vs. Students (requires whiteboards). You present a question. The student’s must answer on their whiteboards, but may consult with each other. If the whole class gets it right, the class gets a point. If at least one student is wrong, the teacher gets a point. It can result in meaningful student conversations, and they enjoy getting to say they beat the teacher.

    When studying multiple categories of things (e.g. different types of elements on the periodic table) break the students into groups and give each group a set of different colored quarter sheets of paper representing the categories. They distribute the colors as evenly as possible within their group. Present an item, and the first group to have the correct, and only the correct, card shoot up first gets a point. Periodically have the groups intrarotate the colored cards so each person gets practice identifying multiple categories. Can get heated. No name I have for it.
     
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2018
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  4. Camel13

    Camel13 Companion

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    Jan 2, 2018

    I love those ideas!
     
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  5. rpan

    rpan Cohort

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    Jan 2, 2018

    Kahoots is great! I also play science Bingo. Kids love it
     
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  6. XWordHobbyist

    XWordHobbyist Rookie

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    Jan 3, 2018

    If you're looking for group activities, I was surprised to discover how effective crossword puzzles can be for teamwork and review. One of the studies here talks about it.
     
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  7. shoreline02

    shoreline02 Cohort

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    Jan 4, 2018

    We use Kahoot all the time and if you don't have access to ipads or chromebooks, students can use phones or just use white boards/paper. I would do the review in class so all students have access to the material and complete it. An extra review sent home can be optional. Plus that saves you paper.
     

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