ESE & English 6-12 FTCE/SAE

Discussion in 'Single Subject Tests' started by Teeko, Dec 5, 2015.

  1. Strandm2

    Strandm2 Rookie

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    Apr 19, 2016

    I thought my last score was a 177.
     
  2. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Apr 20, 2016

    FTCE is now administered by Pearson, so the scoring scale should run from 100 to 300; passing on the multiple-choice portion of English 6-12 is 200, and passing on the written-response portion is 8 out of 12 points. Competency 1's full name is "Knowledge of the effective use of the English language at the postsecondary level", and it's a wide-ranging combination of sociolinguistics, grammar, usage, mechanics, etymology, semantics, morphology, figurative language, and teaching approaches that accounts for 23% of possible multiple-choice points. Competency 5, "Critical responses to media", is less random but accounts for just 12% of multiple choice points. Materials for AP English Language and Composition might be helpful, but I'd recommend starting with the LAFS - the state content standards - and the additional tools at http://www.fldoe.org/academics/standards/florida-standards/educator-resources.stml; make full use of Wikipedia.
     
  3. Strandm2

    Strandm2 Rookie

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    Thank you. I'll keep at it.
     
  4. NikCov

    NikCov Rookie

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    Apr 21, 2016

    Does anyone know how to send a private message? Very new to this process...in every sense of the word!!! (Career changer...)

    I will be taking the test soon May 9th...and now having the sinking feeling I have been studying very old information from the 2 different types of study guides I have.

    Just reading the previous post from the last month have been a GREAT help...and has given me a few new avenues to explore before my upcoming test date. But, I'll admit I'm slightly nervous!!!!!!!
     
  5. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Apr 21, 2016

  6. Le Bibliothécaire

    Le Bibliothécaire New Member

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    Apr 22, 2016

    Hello everyone,
    I just took the FTCE exam for the third time yesterday and failed again... I mirror all of your thoughts that it is depressing and defeating to see that "Not Pass" after you studied for weeks/months.
    I have made my own study guides, read two outdated - but still semi-informational - texts.
    My first score was a 189, after creating my own study guide based off of competencies & google I scored a 193 (climbing, slowly).
    I don't know what my third score will be can't be higher than my second.
    My question is, what sources did everyone else use to create their study guides? Paying close attention to the "appropriate choice for teaching ________." Whatever the example may be.

    I'm in the process of beefing up my already large study guide to hope for the best. Anyone that's passed... HELP, please!
    I am also MORE than willing to let you all see my study guides, notes, etc.

    Au Revoir!
     
  7. Le Bibliothécaire

    Le Bibliothécaire New Member

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    Apr 22, 2016

    Hi LitGirl!
    I am new (about ten minutes) to the site, and I was wondering where you found these elusive Elmer's Notes. I cannot seem to find them? Thank you.
     
  8. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Apr 22, 2016

    13scribes likes this.
  9. NikCov

    NikCov Rookie

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    Apr 23, 2016

    Thank you for the information! I will definitely try to use it as an additional study aide
     
  10. NikCov

    NikCov Rookie

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    Apr 23, 2016

    Teacher Groupie...for some reason I was unable to open the link you provided. I also tried to open the link you provided for the other member (which was exactly the same...)
    With no luck...any suggestions?
    Once I get to the FLDOE site, and go to the educator-resource site, what is next? or where do I find the information?
     
  11. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Apr 23, 2016

    I'm more than slightly surprised that you can't open the page. Click on this link, NikCov, and you should see a list of the threads in the Single Subject Tests subforum. At the beginning of the list are several threads that are "pinned" for everyone's easy access; "Elmer's English resources, revived" is one of them, and it's the thread with Elmer's lists.

    It's possible that something in the forum software isn't yet allowing you to open the files attached to the first post in the thread, but that's a separate issue.
     
  12. JennyP

    JennyP New Member

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    I just took this exam today and passed the multiple choice part; obviously I won't get my results back for the essay for awhile but I'm pretty confident about it. My main study guides were Jim Burke's The English Teacher's Companion 4th edition and the FTCE: Complete Review and Study Guide by Jane Thielemann-Downs. IMHO you need a pretty solid background in both American and English literature, although that comprised a very small portion of my exam. Most of the questions were theoretical and based on assessment practices for all 4 aspects of ELA. You need to be able to think about and apply teaching strategies to pass this test, and simply memorizing information is not likely to help much. They are also asking about multimedia applications in the classroom as well as digital formats... I read, retread and took copious notes on both my guides and reviewed like crazy. Mind blowing and I'm glad it's over--I've had a headache for the last week!
     
  13. Joshua Winn

    Joshua Winn Rookie

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    Apr 26, 2016

    Hello everyone! My name is Joshua. I just started studying for the FTCE English 6-12 exam! I contacted my school district and they couldn't recommend any study material. I am using FTCE: English 6-12 A Complete Content Review for the Florida Teacher Certification Exam by Dr. Jane Thielemann-Downs and FTCE English 6-12 Flashcard Study System: FTCE Subject Test Practice Questions and Examinations for the Florida Teacher Certification Examinations by Mometrix Media.

    Are these materials good for preparing for the exam? Also, how long did you study for before taking the exam? Finally, how many hours per day did you study? Thanks for your help!
     
  14. JennyP

    JennyP New Member

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    Apr 26, 2016

    I used the book you have by Jane Thielemann-Downs and Jim Burke's The English Teacher's Companion 4th ed. I studied about 2-3 hours per day average (shorter times during week, since I work full time, and longer on the weekends) for about a month before taking the test. Burke's book is helpful for reading about practical classroom situations and also lists the Common Core standards inside the front and back covers. Downs' book is great too because it goes through each competency. Her book is redundant in places but I found that taking my own notes and reviewing those was instrumental in learning the material needed to pass. Hope that helps you--good luck!
     
  15. Joshua Winn

    Joshua Winn Rookie

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    Apr 26, 2016

    Thank you for this information! I find Dr. Thielemann-Downs' book to be redundant, too. I will start taking notes and look into Jim Burke's The English Teacher's Companion 4th ed!
     
  16. Lit Girl

    Lit Girl Rookie

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    I like the second half of Jane Thielmans book as the information seemed to be more concise than the first half. It's almost like there were two different writers! I also liked the practice quizzes in the back section. I don't think they necessarily resembled the actual test question structure on the exam, but I like to be able to test any knowledge.
     
  17. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    May 2, 2016

    Practice questions are best used not as absolute examples of what a test will ask and how it will ask it but rather as opportunities to rehearse the concepts and basic principles on which the questions depend. Scenario questions are notorious for bringing concepts and principles into play without explicitly naming them; it's up to the test taker to be able to recognize those concepts and principles on the fly.
     
  18. nguyenml

    nguyenml New Member

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    May 2, 2016

    I got my multiple choice results already and I passed! yay! Now Im just waiting for the essay- which I felt pretty good about at the time. Hopefully I will know soon! Thanks for asking!
     
  19. Lit Girl

    Lit Girl Rookie

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    May 2, 2016

    Sorry, I was out of the country for a while and just catching up on these. A few things I am using (I passed the essay, but not the multiple choice):

    Elmers notes for literary terms

    Study Stack website---free! you can use the search tool to plug in "Teaching Strategies" "Literary works" "Famous authors" "Grammar," etc and it will pull up a bunch of options to choose from. Really, really like this site and it's like free practice tests and a break from the usual paper/notecard study time. I put in so many different things to study, I can't speak highly enough about the ability to test my knowledge.

    I have the Jane Thielman book which is ok...the second half is much better than the first, in my opinion, especially after taking the test. I do like the quizzes just to see how much I'm retaining, and this book does have several.


     
  20. Lit Girl

    Lit Girl Rookie

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    Study Guides I put together:

    Integrated Curriculum: It is about making connections. Helping students gain comprehensive understandings within and across various disciplines. A group investigation project. one that connects different areas of study by cutting across subject matter lines and emphasizing unifying concepts. Integration focuses on making connections for students, allowing them to engage in relevant, meaningful activities that can be connected to real life.

    Interdisciplinary teaching: a method or set of methods, used to teach a unit across different curricular disciplines.

    Integrated curriculum: Logical Fallacies utilized when analyzing argument: Equivocation, ad hominem, false analogy. They prove nothing/a fake or deceptive argument that proves nothing. An error in logic.

    English languages derived from Germanic

    APA Citation Style (American Psychological Association): Most commonly used to cite sources within the social sciences.

    MLA Citation Style (Modern Language Association): Most commonly used to write papers and cite sources within the liberal arts and humanities.

    Chicago/Turabian Citation Style: Called the “Editors Bible.” Used in literature, history & the arts. Provides writers the outlet for commenting on cited sources. Most commonly used in the discipline of history.

    Imagery: Visually or descriptive language, especially in literary work. Tennyson.

    Diction: the choice and use of words in speech or writing

    Etymonline: Best source to look of history of a word

    Form: the way in which parts of a piece of writing or music or of a work of art are arranged

    Root words: a basic word to which affixes prefixes and suffixes is a root word bc it forms the basis of a new word

    Bromide: Phrase or platitude, insincerity or lack of originality

    Pejorative: Expressing contempt of disapproval

    Trope: Figure or metaphorical use of a word or expression. Figure of speech for artistic effect

    Etymology: the study of words and the way in which their meanings have changed throughout history; The historical development of its meaning.

    Decoding: the ability to read words by translating written symbols into the sounds of spoken language. Also called “word identification.”

    Ellipses: Used to omit information.

    Context clues: hints that an author gives to help define a difficult or unusual word. The clue may appear within the same sentence as the word to which it refers, or it may follow in a preceding sentence.

    When targeting words to be used in vocabulary instruction, the teacher should select words that support the big ideas in the text.

    Enumeration: A complete, ordered listing of all the items in a collection.

    Double Entry Journal: strategy that enables students to record their responses to text as they read. Students write down phrases or sentences from their assigned reading and write their own reaction to that passage.

    Semantic mapping & webbing: Used to help develop students’ cognitive abilities because these methods encourage the integration, interaction and understanding of ideas from various content areas.


    Marginal listening: We pay attention to what is being said at first, then are easily distracted

    Evaluative listening: when someone is already excited to hear what you have to say. Sometimes they may miss the message bc they are already looking to respond

    Active listening: Most effective way of listening. Focusing all attention on one person and one conversation.

    Onomatopoeia: the formation of a word from a sound associated with what is named. It mimics the natural sounds of a thing. IE: Cuckoo, sizzle.

    Hyperbole: Exaggerated statements or claims not meant to be taken literally. Extreme exaggeration.

    Thematic Unit: the organization of a curriculum around “macro themes.” Integrates basic disciplines like reading, math & science with the exploration of a broad subject, such as communities, rain forests, river basins, the use of energy, and so on. Helps students see the big picture so they can make sense of English instruction. Teachers can connect curriculum based on students live, making it more interesting.

    Literature circles: Small groups of students gather together to discuss a piece of literature in depth. Guided by students response to what they have read.

    Literature focus unit: A multi genre approach to teaching language arts, focusing on a theme, skill or pedagogy as a focus. Best in elementary education.

    Informal reading inventory: an informal diagnostic reading test, usually that the student will be reading in class to determine what level instruction should begin. To test comprehension and understand vocab. Teacher uses symbols

    Symbolism: Poetic expression. Beyond five senses.

    Rhythem: distinct beat produced by a pattern of accented and unaccented syllable

    Apologue: A moral fable with personified animals or inanimate objects. (Aseops Fables). George Orwell (Animal Farm), Rudyard Kipling (The Jungle Book)

    Blank verse: Unrhymed iambic pentameter (Shakespeare plays 16th-17th century)

    Traditional grammar: Quizzes, grammar, diagrams, terminology and rules, worksheets

    Allegory: a story, poem or picture that can be interpreted to reveal a hidden meaning, typically a moral or political one. Figures of speech where abstract ideas and principles are described in terms of characters, figures and events. Employed in prose and poetry to tell a story with a purpose of teaching an idea or principle. (The Fairie Queen, Pilgrims Progress, Paradise Lost)

    Allusion: an expression designed to call something to mind without mentioning it explicitly. An indirect or passing or passing reference. (The Wasteland by TS Eliot)

    Denotation: a translation of a sign to its meaning, precisely to its literal meaning, more or less like dictionaries try to define it.

    Connotation: a feeling that a word invokes in addition to its literal or primary meaning.

    Metaphor: a figure of speech in which a word or phrase is applied to an object or action to which it is not literally applicable. Implied or hidden comparison to two unrelated things.

    Foreshadowing: a warning or indication of a future event

    Assonance: In poetry, the repetition of the sound of a vowel or diphthong in nonrhyming stressed syllables near enough to each other for the echo to be discernable. One of the building blocks of verse. Does not have to rhyme. EX: Penitence, reticence. Repetition of vowel sounds within words.

    Heroic: Very brave or behavior that is very bold or dramatic

    Fables: Short animal tales to teach a lesson

    Romanticism: 18th & 19th centuries, began in Germany & England. Emphasized imagination, fancy, freedom, emotion, wildness, beauty of the natural world, rights of individual and nobility of common man (Wordsworth, Lord Byron, Victor Hugo)

    Realism: 19th century reaction to romanticism. True to life approach. (Tolstoy, George Eliot)

    Modernism: knowledge is not absolute. (Einstain, quantum, freud theories)

    Rhyme: Repetition of accented syllables with the same vowel and consonant sounds

    Couplet: Two lines of verse, usually in same meter and joined by rhyme, that form a unit. EX: “She was a little tense. The notice made no sense.”

    Running record: An observational tool that contributes to a students language skills

    IRI Running Record: A series of graded passages, increasing in difficulty, used to determine a childs reading level for word identification and comprehension. Enables you to see strengths and weaknesses.

    Structural Grammar: Views language as 3 levels: Individual sounds, groups of sounds and groups of words

    Surrealism: 1920’s writing with element of surprise, juxtapositions and non sequitur.

    Reciprocal reading: Predicting, generating questions, clarifying & summarizing

    Iambic Pentameter: A line of verse with 5 metrical feet each consisting of 1 short syllable followed by 1 long syllable. EX: Two households, both alike in dignity.” Shakespeare used IP. Used in English poetry and verse drama.

    Limerick: a humorous, bawdy, verse of three long and two short lines rhyming aabba, popularized by Edward Lear. 5 lines. The first, second, and fifth lines must have seven to ten syllables while rhyming and having the same verbal rhythm. The third and fourth lines only have to have to have five to seven syllables, and have to rhyme with each other and have the same rhythm.

    Sonnet: a poem of 14 lines using any number of formal rhyme schemes, in English typically having ten syllables per line.

    Aside: A short speech delivered by an actor in a play, expressing the characters thoughts; Spoken in an undertone to the audience; other characters are deaf to it.

    Stanza: Formal division of lines in a poem

    Cliché: Overused phrase.

    Explication: Act of interpreting or discovering the meaning of a text, usually involves close reading and special attention to figurative language

    Theme: The insight about human life that is revealed in a literary work

    Chiasmus: In poetry, a type of rhetorical balance in which the second part is syntactically balanced against the first, but with the parts reversed

    Metonymy: Figure of speech that replaces the name of one thing with the name of another closely related thing (The crown = monarchy)

    Didactic: Form of fiction or non fiction what teaches a specific lesson or moral and provides a model of correct behavior or thinking

    Persona: Latin for “Mask.” Narrator.

    Paratactic Sentence: Juxtaposes clauses or sentences. “I am tired.”

    Third person limited: Sees events through eyes of a single character

    Foil: Character whose actions are in stark contrast to those of another character

    Diagnosis: Searching for patterns of errors can help a teacher diagnose weaknesses and strengths

    Running record: Documents a students reading as he/she reads out loud. Helps evaluate the reading level.

    Anecdotal record: assessment requires teacher to observe student and record as soon as possible after an observation, an account of exactly what took place

    Informal reading inventory: The student reads aloud and the teachers uses symbols to note the types of miscues the student makes. Comprehension is graded by questions asked, remember details and to understand vocab

    Choral reading: Poetry is a good example. It can be read in unison, one line per child, or in groups.

    Metacognition: The ability to understand and control ones own thought processes. To realize what they do and do not know, set purposes, select appropriate reading and learning strategies, check their understanding and evaluate their performance

    Onomatopoeia: The use of words that imitate sounds

    Parallel Construction: A clue, but only a clue

    Irony of Situation: Discrepancy exists when something is about to happen to a character or characters who expect the opposite outcome

    Balance: Constructing a sentence so both halves are about the same length and important sentences can be unbalanced to serve a special effect as well.

    Conceit: an elaborate metaphor that compares two things that are startlingly different (extended metaphor)

    Imagery: Descriptive or figurative language used in literature to create word pictures for the reader

    Soliloquy: A long speech expressing the thoughts of a character along on stage

    Speaker: The imaginary voice assumed by the writer of a poem

    Prose: the ordinary form of written language

    Synecdoche: a figure of speech in which a part is made to represent the whole, or vice versa, as in “Cleveland won by six runs (meaning “Cleveland’s baseball team).”

    Tanka: a Japanese poem consisting of 5 lines, the first and third of which have five syllables and the other seven, making 31 syllables in all and giving a complete picture of an event or mood. Similar to a haiku, but it has two additional lines. Means “short song.”

    Haiku: a Japanese poem of 3 lines, 17 syllables, in three lines of five, seven and five, traditionally evoking images of the natural world. Rarely rhymes.

    Beowolf: Written in Anglo Saxon period of British literature

    Huckleberry Finn: “The day they arrested the book.”

    Small groups: promotes collaboration and gets students involved at a personal level.

    Mini lesson: short lesson with narrow focus that provides instruction or skill or concept that students will then relate to a large lesson that will follow

    Pre-established criteria: helps with performance based assessment
     
  21. Lit Girl

    Lit Girl Rookie

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    Teaching approaches/strategies:

    · Lecture: An important way to communicate info. Disadvantage is that it minimizes feedback from students. Advantage when it’s used with other strategies.

    · Case method: Instructional strategy that engages students in active discussion about issues and problems in practical application.

    · Discussion: Can be used in large and small groups.

    · Active learning: Learning environments that allow students to talk and listen, read, write and reflect as they approach coursework through problem solving exercises, informal small groups, stimulations, case studies, role playing and other activities. Learning is enhanced when students become actively involved in the learning process. Stimulates critical thinking.

    · Active student response: Measure of engagement of learner in tasks and activities

    · Cooperative learning: Systematic pedagogical strategy that encourages small groups of students to work together for the achievement of a common goal. Stimulates student/teacher discussions and encourages electronic exchanges. Helps address social needs of the students.

    · Graphic organizer: Visual and spatial organization of info to help students understand presented concepts

    · Integrating technology: Using email as a method of communication. Online notes and basic understanding.

    · Distance learning: Through tv or correspondence courses. Any form of teaching and learning where the student and teacher are not in the same place.

    · Teacher centered: teacher is perceived to be the only source of info.

    · Learner centered: learner is also an important resource and capable of sharing.

    · Subject matter centered: the subject matter gains primacy over learner.

    · Teacher dominated: Only teachers voice is heard.

    · Teaming: Best for constructing and enacting cross curricular units into all aspects of the curriculum.

    · Interdisciplinary approach: A method used to teach a unit across different curricular disciplines. For example, the seventh grade language arts, science and social studies teachers might work together to form an interdisciplinary unit on rivers. Example: Incorporating technology into a unit that includes science and language arts would be creating an interactive website about ecosystems found in Florida everglades.

    · Interactive approach: More student talk and less teacher talk. Students can interact with other students and the teacher.

    · Constructivist approach: Students are expected to construct knowledge and meaning out for what they are taught by connecting them to prior experience

    · Banking approach: teacher deposits knowledge into the “empty” minds of student for students to commit to memory

    · Integrated approach: Teacher connects the lesson of same subject (intradisciplinary) or other lessons with other subject to make the approach interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary. Invite guest speakers for collaboration, partner with faculty from other departments, make use of pedogogies that lend themselves to interdisciplinary teaching. MAKING CONNECTIONS.

    · Disciplinal approach: Limits teacher to discussing lessons within the boundary of his/her subject.

    · Collaborative approach: Welcomes group work, teamwork, partnerships and group discussion

    · Individualistic: Wants individual students to work by themselves

    · Direct teaching: teacher directly tells or shows or demonstrates what is to be taught. Explicit instruction.

    · Indirect/guided: teacher guides the learner to discover things for himself/herself. Teacher facilitates the learning process by allowing the learner to be engaged in learning process with his/her guidance. Best used when learning process is inquiry based and the learning context is a problem. Can be used for problem solving.

    · Research based: teaching and learning are anchored on research findings

    · Whole child: learning process takes into account the academic, emotional, creative, psychological, spiritual and developmental needs of the learners

    · Metacognitive: Brings the learner to the process of thinking about thinking.

    · Problem based: Teaching-learning process focused on problems. Time spent on analyzing and solving problems.

    · Peer tutoring: Teacher guided, non disabled student helps in areas of study

    · Differentiated instruction: addressing varying abilities, strengths, etc by imposing choice of learning activity, task suit learning style, student groupings, authentic lesson & problem based activities

    · Transfer of Stimulus control: An approach that identifies the skills to be taught and uses direct daily measure of students performance to acquire the skills

    · Task analysis: Strategy goals broke into smaller steps and sequenced while keeping pace in focus.

    · Cloze procedure: Use of semantic and syntactic clues to aid in completing sentences

    · Implicit instruction: Focus on student as an active and involved learner who constructs knowledge by using previously learned info

    · Scaffolding: Applying stages to learning content—direct instruction, tutoring, modeling, independence

    · Mediated scaffolding: personal guidance, assistance, support. Limit the number of concepts introduces and separate those that are likely to be confused. Refrain from introducing two new and unfamiliar labels and provide sufficient guided practice for the group before progressing to individual turns. A procedure provides cues and prompts, gradually removing them so students can perform and respond independently

    · Authentic learning: instruction using real world projects and activities to allow students to discover and explore in a more relevant manner

    · Chunking: presenting information in small manageable units. Helps students learn large amount of information.

    · Direct Measurement: Assessing actual samples of student work. Best for measuring levels of achievement of student learning on specific outcomes. Checking on student achievement.

    · Learning strategy: Approach that teaches students how to learn and remember a particular event

    · Content enhancements: Techniques to aid in organization and to present content in an understandable manner. Uses powerful teaching devices.

    · Modification: Changing content, material, or delivery of instruction

    · Guided practice: interactive instruction between students and teacher. After teacher introduces new learning, he/she begins the student practice process by engaging students in a similar task to what they will complete later in the lesson independently.

    · Transfer of stimulus control: a process in which prompts are removed once target behavior is occuring in the presence of stimulus. A behavioral treatment technique. Provide instruction prompts to aid in correct responses.

    · Mnemonic: to aid in memory.

    · Brainstorming: A group activity technique by which efforts are made to find a conclusion for a specific problem a gathering a list of ideas spontaneously contributed by its members.

    · Fluency probe: Teacher calculates number of words read correctly per minute to determine students reading ability.

    · Literacy development: Prior knowledge acts as a lens through which students view and comprehend new information

    · Active student response: Teacher supplies students with notes for a lesson or independent reading. Keeps students engaged in lessons. Measure of engagement.

    · Cues and prompts: to provide cues for instruction. Used to help teach, remind.

    · Student interest surveys: Teachers best source of info about a students’ personal experiences for the purpose of promoting their literacy development

    · Strategic instruction: planned, sequential instruction to show similarities between acquired and new knowledge

    · Fluency building: Measure that encourages practice of skills to improve accuracy and rate of use

    · Chaining: Teaching tool that works for home and school. Reinforces individual responses occurring in a sequence to form a complex behavior. Technique where performance is reinforced so he will continue to perform more complex tasks in the sequence

    · Chained response: Breakdown of a task into parts so student finished the task by starting with first step in the sequence and performing each component until the task is completed

    · Diagnostic prescriptive: outlines the students strengths and weaknesses.

    · Facilitated group: Students engage in active learning lessons design and overseen by teacher but managed by students

    · Guided practice: Give opportunities to gain knowledge by offering cues, prompts, added sequential info

    · Implicit Instruction: Focus on the student as an active and involved learner who constructs knowledge by using previously learned info. Teacher clearly outlines.

    · Explicit instruction: Teacher provides info and content to support the learning process

    · Contingent teaching:

    · Skill Drill: Repetition of skills

    · Differentiated instruction: Different avenues to learning in terms of acquiring content, processing, constructing or making sense of ideas to help students learn effectively.

    · Cooperative learning: A class divided into groups to work together on a task or activity

    · Generalization: Ability to use skills learned across various settings

    · Naturalistic teaching:

    · Systematic feedback: Positive reinforcement and confirmation to improve learning

    · Prompting techniques: Visual, auditory, or tactile cue is presented to facilitate of a task or to perform a behavior

    · Learning Center: Specific area or activities enhance the curricular content and let independent or small group discussion

    · Ability grouping: placement in education activities according to performance or academic achievement

    · Precision teaching: Approach that identifies the skills to be taught and uses direct daily measure of students performance to acquire the skills

    · Concept generalization:

    · Multiple intelligence strategies 9: linguistic, logic-mathematical, spatial, musical, bodily-kinesthetic, interpersonal, intrapersonal, naturalistic, existential

    · Modification: changing content, material or delivery of instruction

    · Modeling: Method that helps make connections between material to be learned and process to learn it by acting out sequences while students observe and imitate the task
     
  22. Lit Girl

    Lit Girl Rookie

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    May 2, 2016

    · Teaching assessments:

    · Summative assessment: Steps of the direct or lecture method which evaluates student learning by comparing it against a standard (final exam, project or paper). High point value.

    · Formative assessment: Monitors student learning to provide ongoing feedback that can be used by instructors to improve their teaching and students to improve their learning. Helps identify weaknesses and strengths. Low or no point value (submit a research proposal, submit one or two sentences identifying the main point of the lecture).

    · Anecdotal assessment: Short, narrative descriptions of observations in the classroom. Teachers can jot down notes as he/she goes about their day.

    · Authentic assessment: Drives the curriculum. Teachers determine tasks students will perform to demonstrate their mastery and a curriculum is developed that will enable students to perform those tasks well. Complements Traditional Assessment.

    · Traditional assessment: Multiple choice tests, fill in the blanks, true/false, matching etc. Curriculum drives assessment.

    · Running record: It is ongoing and curriculum based (formative assessment). Provides a graphic representation of students oral reading, identifying patterns of effective and ineffective strategy use. Helps teachers document progress over time, decide what students need to learn. Helps teachers measure progress, plan for future instruction and communicate progress to parents.

    · Alternative Assessment: Designed by teachers to gauge students understanding of material. Could be open ended questions, written compositions, oral presentations, projects, experiments & portfolios of student work.


    Positive feedback with specific area to improve is the best way a teacher can respond to students work/presentations.

    Graphic organizers:

    · Holistic: Based on the whole project, not just each part

    · Vinn Diagram: Shows all possible logical relations. Circles. Best for compare/contrast.

    · KWL: Instructional reading strategy that guides students through a text.

    o KNOW: Students brainstorm everything they KNOW about a topic

    o WANT TO KNOW: Students generate a list of questions about what they WANT TO KNOW about a topic

    o LEARNED: Info they have LEARNED is recorded in the chart.



    Writing Process:

    · Prewriting:

    o Find your idea

    o Build on your idea--- brainstorming and free writing

    o Plan and structure

    · Writing: Prepare a rough draft

    · Revision: Your story can change, adopt ARRR approach

    o Add enough words, details and information to make sense

    o Rearrange to ensure the flow, pacing and sequence of events are in order

    o Remove passages that don’t fit

    o Replace details with better information or text

    · Editing: check for grammar, spelling, punctuation and clarity.

    · Publishing: Publish paper


    Audience awareness: Do some research and prewriting before worrying about accommodating an audience. Then ask questions to analyze your audience. Not necessarily done in pre-writing phase.

    Persuasive Speaking: EX: play the Martin Luther King “I have a dream” speech, or the video of Angelina Jolie discussing global action for kids. Once kids see it visually, they will be more prepared for the written assignment. Allow students to choose their own topic so they feel ownership.

    · Preparing and Writing the first draft:

    o Claim: the main point of your argument

    o Big Names: the experts referred to during a speech

    o Logos: The logic or rationale of your argument

    o Pathos: The emotional aspect to your argument

    o Ethos: The trustworthiness of your claims

    o Kairos: The urgency of your argument

    o Research: The graphs, tables & illustrations that support your argument

    · Peer editing: Important to use after a first draft. Students can then revise.

    · Speaking and presenting: Students should present their persuasive speeches.

    Deciphering media messages: to enable students to engage in the critical study of media messages and culture. Examine media texts and explore political, economic and social contexts in which media is produced, distributed and consumed.

    Rhetoric/Rehtoricians: The study of effective thinking, writing & speaking strategies

    A project: This type of assignment best assesses a students innovative and creative abilities

    Thomas Bulfinch: Wrote “The Age of Fable & Stories of Gods and Heroes”

    Prosaically: uses straightforward, ordinary words

    Bromide: A figure of speech referring to a boring person who often overuses irrelevant clichés in a conversation

    Phonological clues based on speech sounds in words

    Great vowel shift: based on 15th century Shakespeare

    Euphemism: to make harsh words sound softer/nicer

    Star crossed: meant disaster in old time Shakespeare

    Et tal in a citation: for more than 4 authors

    Tone is the way a writer overall expresses attitude

    Voice is who the reader hears speaking

    Ode: lyric poem in the form of an address to a particular subject.

    Villanelle: a 19 line poem with 2 rhymes throughout. 5 tercets and a quatrain, first and third lines of the opening tercet recurring alternately at the ned of the other.
     
  23. Lit Girl

    Lit Girl Rookie

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    The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Mark Twain, 1884

    The first ban of Mark Twain’s American classic in Concord, MA in 1885 called it “trash and suitable only for the slums.” Objections to the book have evolved, but only marginally. Twain’s book is one of the most-challenged of all time and is frequently challenged even today because of its frequent use of the word “nigger.” Otherwise it is alleged the book is “racially insensitive,” “oppressive,” and “perpetuates racism.”


    The Autobiography of Malcolm X, Malcolm X and Alex Haley, 1965 (Grove Press)

    Objectors have called this seminal work a “how-to-manual” for crime and decried because of “anti-white statements” present in the book. The book presents the life story of Malcolm Little, also known as Malcolm X, who was a human rights activist and who has been called one of the most influential Americans in recent history.


    Beloved,Toni Morrison, 1987

    Again and again, this Pulitzer-prize winning novel by perhaps the most influential African-American writer of all time is assigned to high school English students. And again and again, parental complaints are lodged against the book because of its violence, sexual content and discussion of bestiality.


    Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, Dee Brown, 1970

    Subtitled “An Indian History of the American West,” this book tells the history of United States growth and expansion into the West from the point of view of Native Americans. This book was banned by a school district official in Wisconsin in 1974 because the book might be polemical and they wanted to avoid controversy at all costs. “If there’s a possibility that something might be controversial, then why not eliminate it,” the official stated.


    The Call of the Wild, Jack London, 1903

    Generally hailed as Jack London’s best work,The Call of the Wildis commonly challenged for its dark tone and bloody violence. Because it is seen as a man-and-his-dog story, it is sometimes read by adolescents and subsequently challenged for age-inappropriateness. Not only have objections been raised here, the book was banned in Italy, Yugoslavia and burned in bonfires in Nazi Germany in the late 1920s and early 30s because it was considered “too radical.”


    Catch-22, Joseph Heller, 1961

    A school board in Strongsville, OH refused to allow the book to be taught in high school English classrooms in 1972. It also refused to considerCat’s Cradleas a substitute text and removed both books from the school library. The issue eventually led to a 1976 District Court ruling overturning the ban inMinarcini v. Strongsville.




    The Catcher in the Rye, J.D. Salinger, 1951

    Young Holden, favorite child of the censor. Frequently removed from classrooms and school libraries because it is “unacceptable,” “obscene,” “blasphemous,” “negative,” “foul,” “filthy,” and “undermines morality.” And to think Holden always thought “people never notice anything.”


    Fahrenheit 451, Ray Bradbury, 1953

    Rather than ban the book about book-banning outright, Venado Middle school in Irvine, CA utilized an expurgated version of the text in which all the “hells” and “damns” were blacked out. Other complaints have said the book went against objectors religious beliefs. The book’s author, Ray Bradbury, died this year.


    For Whom the Bell Tolls,Ernest Hemingway, 1940

    Shortly after its publication the U.S. Post Office, which purpose was in part to monitor and censor distribution of media and texts, declared the book nonmailable. In the 1970s, eight Turkish booksellers were tried for “spreading propaganda unfavorable to the state” because they had published and distributed the text. This wasn’t Hemingway’s only banned book –A Farewell to ArmsandAcross the River and Into the Treeswere also censored domestically and abroad in Ireland, South Africa, Germany and Italy.


    Gone With the Wind, Margaret Mitchell, 1936

    The Pulitzer-prize winning novel (which three years after its publication became an Academy-Award Winning film) follows the life of the spoiled daughter of a southern plantation owner just before and then after the fall of the Confederacy and decline of the South in the aftermath of the Civil War. Critically praised for its thought-provoking and realistic depiction of ante- and postbellum life in the South, it has also been banned for more or less the same reasons. Its realism has come under fire, specifically its realistic portrayal – though at times perhaps tending toward optimistic -- of slavery and use of the words “nigger” and “darkies.”


    The Grapes of Wrath,John Steinbeck, 1939

    Kern County, California has the great honor both of being the setting of Steinbeck’s novel and being the first place where it was banned (1939). Objections to profanity—especially goddamn and the like—and sexual references continued from then into the 1990s. It is a work with international banning appeal: the book was barred in Ireland in the 50s and a group of booksellers in Turkey were taken to court for “spreading propaganda” in 1973.


    The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald, 1925

    Perhaps the firstgreat American novel that comes to the mind of the average person, this book chronicles the booze-infused and decadent lives of East Hampton socialites. It was challenged at the Baptist College in South Carolina because of the book’s language and mere references to sex.


    Howl,Allen Ginsberg, 1956

    Following in the footsteps of other “Shaping America” bookLeaves of Grassby Walt Whitman, Allen Ginsberg’s boundary-pushing poetic works were challenged because of descriptions of homosexual acts.



    In Cold Blood, Truman Capote, 1966

    The subject of controversy in an AP English class in Savannah, GA after a parent complained about sex, violence and profanity. Banned but brought back.


    Invisible Man,Ralph Ellison, 1952

    Ellison’s book won the 1953 National Book Award for Fiction because it expertly dealt with issues of black nationalism, Marxism and identity in the twentieth century. Considered to be too expert in its ruminations for some high schools, the book was banned from high school reading lists and schools in Pennsylvania, Wisconsin and Washington state.


    The Jungle,Upton Sinclair, 1906

    For decades, American students have studied muckraking and yellow journalism in social studies lessons about the industrial revolution, withThe Jungleheadlining the unit. And yet, the dangerous and purportedly socialist views expressed in the book and Sinclair’sOilled to its being banned in Yugoslavia, East Germany, South Korea and Boston.


    Leaves of Grass,Walt Whitman, 1855

    If they don’t understand you, sometimes they ban you. This was the case when the great American poemLeaves of Grasswas first published and the New York Society for the Suppression of Vice found the sensuality of the text disturbing. Caving to pressure, booksellers in New York, Massachusetts and Pennsylvania conceded to advising their patrons not to buy the “filthy” book.


    Moby-Dick; or The Whale, Herman Melville,1851

    In a real head-scratcher of a case, a Texas school district banned the book from its Advanced English class lists because it “conflicted with their community values” in 1996. Community values are frequently cited in discussions over challenged books by those who wish to censor them.


    Native Son, Richard Wright, 1940

    Richard Wright’s landmark work of literary naturalism follows the life of young Bigger Thomas, a poor Black man living on the South Side of Chicago. Bigger is faced with numerous awkward and frustrating situations when he begins working for a rich white family as their chauffer. After he unintentionally kills a member of the family, he flees but is eventually caught, tried and sentenced to death. The book has been challenged or removed in at least eight different states because of objections to “violent and sexually graphic” content.


    Our Bodies, Ourselves,Boston Women’s Health Book Collective, 1971

    Challenges of this book about the female anatomy and sexuality ran from the book’s publication into the mid-1980s. One Public Library lodged it “promotes homosexuality and perversion.” Not surprising in a country where some legislators want to keep others from saying the word “vagina.”




    The Red Badge of Courage,Stephen Crane, 1895

    Restricting access and refusing to allow teachers to teach books is still a form of censorship in many cases. Crane’s book was among many on a list compiled by the Bay District School board in 1986 after parents began lodging informal complaints about books in an English classroom library.


    The Scarlet Letter, Nathaniel Hawthorne, 1850

    According to many critics, Hawthorne should have been less friendly toward his main character, Hester Prynne (in fairness, so should have minister Arthur Dimmesdale). One isn’t surprised by the moralist outrage the book caused in 1852. But when, one hundred and forty years later, the book is still being banned because it is sinful and conflicts with community values, you have to raise your eyebrows. Parents in one school district called the book “pornographic and obscene” in 1977. Clearly this was before the days of the World Wide Web.


    Sexual Behavior in the Human Male,Alfred C. Kinsey, 1948

    How dare Alfred Kinsey ask men and women questions about their sex lives! The groundbreaking study, truly the first of its scope and kind, was banned from publication abroad and highly criticized at home.


    Stranger in a Strange Land,Robert A. Heinlein, 1961

    The book was actually retained after a 2003 challenge in Mercedes, TX to the book’s adult themes. However, parents were subsequently given more control over what their child was assigned to read in class, a common school board response to a challenge.


    A Streetcar Named Desire,Tennessee Williams, 1947

    The sexual content of this play, which later became a popular and critically acclaimed film, raised eyebrows and led to self-censorship when the film was being made. The director left a number of scenes on the cutting room floor to get an adequate rating and protect against complaints of the play’s immorality.


    Their Eyes Were Watching God,Zora Neale Hurston, 1937

    Parents of students in Advanced English classes in a Virginia high school objected to language and sexual content in this book, which madeTIMEmagazine’s list of top 100 Best English-Language Novels from 1923 to 2005.


    To Kill a Mockingbird,Harper Lee, 1960

    Harper Lee’s great American tome stands as proof positive that the censorious impulse is alive and well in our country, even today. For some educators, the Pulitzer-prize winning book is one of the greatest texts teens can study in an American literature class. Others have called it a degrading, profane and racist work that “promotes white supremacy.” Set in the Great Depression. Theme of good and evil.


    Uncle Tom's Cabin,Harriet Beecher Stowe, 1852

    LikeHuck Finn, Of Mice and MenandGone With the Wind, the contextual, historically and culturally accurate depiction of the treatment of Black slaves in the United States has rankled would-be censors.



    Where the Wild Things Are, Maurice Sendak, 1963

    Sendak’s work is beloved by children in the generations since its publication and has captured the collective imagination. Many parents and librarians, however, did much hand-wringing over the dark and disturbing nature of the story. They also wrung their hands over the baby’s penis drawn inIn the Night Kitchen.


    The Words of Cesar Chavez, Cesar Chavez, 2002

    The works of Chavez were among the many books banned in the dissolution of the Mexican-American Studies Program in Tucson, Arizona. The Tucson Unified School District disbanded the program so as to accord with a piece of legislation which outlawed Ethnic Studies classes in the state. To read more about this egregious case of censorship,click here.


    Crime and Punishment, Fyodor Dostoyevsky, 1866

    Crime and Punishment is about a man who formulates and executes a plan to murder a pawnbroker for his money. Multiple times throughout the novel he argues that by stealing the money, he could do good deeds to make up for the crime. He also is going to commit the murder to prove that some people are naturally capable of such actions and that due to this they have the right to perform them. He compares himself to Napoleon Bonaparte and believes that murder is ok as long as it serves a higher purpose.


    Dials and Digital, Isaac Asimov, 1985

    This essay was written to the acknowledge the possibility that with the creation of the digital clock, the analog one may not be around for much longer (which of course has not proven to be the case). He argued that without the hands to tell time the terms counter clockwise and clockwise would no longer bear meaning. Due to this, pointing an object out at say, 2 o clock, would no longer be relevant and people who use these terms, like army personnel would lose a good way of communication. Asimov uses the Cause and Effect structure to explain his beliefs.

    Asimov also wrote iRobot 1950- A futuristic novel about a cop who believes that the robots being created will turn against humans, which they do. The novel focuses on the bond he makes with a robot who has been taught to have emotions and their fight against robots who are trying to take over. Wrote a futuristic book.


    We, Yevgeny Zamyatin, 1921 This may not be a good option due to content. pay specific attention to whether or not they say a grade level?


    A dystopian futuristic novel about a man, D-503 who loves the world of sameness that he lives in. He eventually meets a woman I-330 who does the unthinkable by flirting with him instead of filling out a formal request for a (for lack of better terms) booty call. He thinks about turning her in to the government, but doesn’t which is a good thing because she ends up telling him that she is part of the resistance. Then his assigned lover wants to break the law and have a baby, and he complies, when she tells him that they will do the right thing and let it be raised by the government. Once pregnant she changes her mind and I-330 helps to smuggle her over the wall (the wall separates the sameness and the resistance). Some time after, D-503 gets a lobotomy of some sort, which causes him to like the sameness again and want to get rid of the resistance so he betrays I-330. The resistance ends up winning anyway.

    Day of the Oprichnik, Sorokin 2006

    A fantastical work depicting a futuristic dystopian Russia.

    Fathers and Sons, Ivan Turgenev, 1862

    Turgenev was a realism writer and was concerned with social reform.

    Written as a response to the growing cultural schism between liberals of the 1830s/1840s & the growing nihilist movement, Fathers & Sons parallels both the nihilists (the "sons") & the 1830s liberals who sought Western-based social change in Russia. Additionally, these two modes of thought were contrasted with the conservative Slavophiles, who believed that Russia's path lay in its traditional spirituality.


    War and Peace and Anna Karenina, Leo Tolstoy—Realist Fiction

    Anna Karenina

    In their world frivolous liaisons are commonplace, but Anna and Vronsky’s consuming passion makes them a target for scorn and leads to Anna’s increasing isolation. The heartbreaking trajectory of their relationship contrasts sharply with the colorful swirl of friends and family members who surround them, especially the newlyweds Kitty and Levin, who forge a touching bond as they struggle to make a life together. Anna Karenina is a masterpiece not only because of the unforgettable woman at its core and the stark drama of her fate, but also because it explores and illuminates the deepest questions about how to live a fulfilled life.


    War and Peace

    Tolstoy's epic masterpiece intertwines the lives of private and public individuals during the time of the Napoleonic wars and the French invasion of Russia. The fortunes of the Rostovs and the Bolkonskys, of Pierre, Natasha, and Andrei, are intimately connected with the national history that is played out in parallel with their lives. Balls and soirees alternate with councils of war and the machinations of statesmen and generals, scenes of violent battles with everyday human passions in a work whose extraordinary imaginative power has never been surpassed.


    Macbeth, William Shakespeare, 1605-6? English renaissance

    Main theme- destruction wrought when ambition goes unchecked by moral constraints. Highly violent. Exhibits that once one decides to use violence to further one’s quest for power, it is difficult to stop. Visions and hallucinations recur throughout the play and serve as reminders about culpability and guilt. Play about a man who has heard a prophecy by three witches that he will be king. Unfortunately, they also prophesized that another man, Banquo would be father to a long line of future kings of England. In order to hurry things along, Macbeth begins killing off anyone who stand in the way of his being King, beginning with the present King and working his way down to Banquo and his family. People eventually get suspicious of Macbeth and cut off his head. His wife urges him on but develops a conscience. <<Very short summary. May want to research a better one. Main theme, fate and free will. Fate may be predetermined, but peoples free will determine how people reach their destinies.

    A Midsummer Night’s Dream

    A humorous play about the three different groups of people, royals, fairies, and craftsmen rehearsing a play. During this play, the fairies put love spells on various people who were in love with other people. IT works out and everyone is married. The main themes are loves difficulty, magic and dreams. A major motif is the contrast between characters and the opposites that they represent.

    Romeo and Juliet

    Play about two lovers who cannot be together because their families hate each other. In the end, Romeo dies just as Juliet awakes from a potion and in turn she kills herself as well to be with him.

    Major themes include, love, hate mortality, and youth.

    Uncle Toms Cabin, Harriott Beacher Stowe 1850

    what language did she use? Colloquial. Purpose of her book was to end slavery. 1850. Written after Fugitive Slave Act which made it illegal to offer aid to fugitive slaves. Themes of slavery, Christian values and the power of women. Writing style informal and conversational.


    The Great Gatsby, F Scott Fitzgerald 1925

    Prohibition, the Jazz Age, after WWI. Love for a woman who symbolized everything he wanted, even as she led him toward everything he despised. Corruption of money and dishonesty, the American dream of happiness and individualism has disintegrated into the mere pursuit of wealth. New and old wealth.


    The Color Purple, Alice Walker, 1982 contemporary era

    The power of narrative and voice. Uses epistolary (letter writing) form to emphasize the power of communication as Celie writes letters to God & Nettie writes letters to Celie. The story shows that the ability to express one’s thoughts and feelings is crucial to developing a sense of self. A story of the power of strong female relationships. A story of violence, love, family, sexuality, race and religion-<<themes; The Color Purple is the story of two sisters who were abused by their father and Celie who is raped and bears children from him. Nettie, her sister is married off to a man who only wants her to take care of his kids. In lieu of all of this, both women become good friends with other women in their new family’s lives and both are unhappy. Celie goes away to Africa, but when she comes back it’s like their life has started over, as they are both free.

    Better- Although this book centers mainly on Celie and her life, it also focuses on the journeys of the other women who are in her life including Shug, Nettie, Sophia, and Squeak, Harpo’s second wife. Together, these women help one another discover the beauty in themselves and in life and by leaning on each other, they gain the strength to overcome their oppressive men and live their lives their way.

    Fellow in the Grass, Emily Dickinson, 1096 American Renaissance writer

    A poem about a snake, which he is afraid of. He states that he is not afraid of other nature and is “cordial” to them, but snakes makes his breathing tighter, zero at the bone. The poem is an extended metaphor. ALSO- The speaker in the male is a male, NOT a female!

    There is a Solitude of Space

    She expresses the contrast between the solitude found in life and that found within one’s soul. She believed that the privacy within the soul would end with death.

    Such an excursion into nature could put human beings in contact with the higher laws of the universe. Coming into contact with nature. Contrasts the perceptions of nature from a distance with the reality of nature experienced at first hand. Personified nature.

    Hamlet, Shakespeare 1600

    Themes of uncertainty, complexity of action, mystery of death, the nation as a deceased body. A tragedy about the Prince of Denmark. Incest, Revenge. Hamlet kills his uncle to avenge his fathers death. Dead royal family.


    Canterbury Tales, Chaucer 1400

    First poem written in the English language, said to have invented modern English, recording words and phrases that had never been put on paper before. Chaucer considered the model and inspiration for English poetry. Written in iambic pentameter, using rhyming couplets (similar sounding words that rhyme at the end). Theme of Christianity, deception, spring, reputation.

    Chaucer used sonnets.

    Pardoners Tale

    King Lear, Shakespeare
     
  24. Lit Girl

    Lit Girl Rookie

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    May 2, 2016

    Banned Books-

    Forever by Judy Bloom, which explores sexuality and love. About a 17 year old girl who explores birth control, sex, etc.

    The catcher in the Rye- J.D Salinger, banned for profanity, sexual references, alcohol and cigarette references. It explores the life of a 16 year old boy who is expelled from school and journeys to New York.



    A small group of parents and students brand Huckleberry Finn as a racist, sexist and immoral book, and persuade the principal of George Mason High School to have it removed from the library shelves. “The day they arrested the book”






    Cloze Passage and when to use one:

    Cloze Procedure Defined

    The cloze procedure is a reading comprehension activity in which words are omitted from a passage and students are required to fill in the blanks. This procedure is incredibly useful in reading instruction because it can be easily done by any teacher and provides valuable reading comprehension information.

    Creating a Cloze Passage

    There are several different methods used to create cloze passages. All of these methods entail finding a passage that is at the target student's reading level and deleting words in a pattern. The range for deleting words depends on reading ability and what kind of skills you wish to assess. You can delete every five words up to every 10-20 words or more. If you wish to assess a more specific skill, such as specific vocabulary words, you can select a passage and delete only those vocabulary words.

    Below is an example of a cloze passage, using the paragraph above, in which I deleted about every fifth word:

    There are several different (blank) used to create cloze (blank). All of these (blank) entail finding a passage (blank) is at the target (blank) reading level and deleting (blank) in a pattern. The (blank) for deleting words (blank) on reading ability and what (blank) of skills you wish to (blank). You can delete every (blank) words up to every (blank) words or more. If (blank) wish to assess a more (blank) skill, such as (blank) vocabulary words, you can (blank) a passage and delete (blank) those vocabulary words.


    Assessment Using Cloze

    The cloze procedure is commonly used in reading assessment because it requires students to use different reading comprehension skills to fill in the blank. For example, if a cloze procedure was used to assess vocabulary, students would need to use their knowledge of the vocabulary words as well as context clues in the passage to determine which word should be used to fill in the blank.

    Assessment using the cloze procedure is less concerned with fluent student reading and more with targeting specific reading comprehension skills. Reading a cloze passage requires students to look to either side of a blank to figure out which word needs to be used to fill in the blank. This flexibility means that the cloze procedure can be used to assess a variety of skills.


    Semantics- the meaning of a word, phrase, or sentence and whether it makes sense

    Syntactic- refers to grammatical structure and whether or not it makes sense

    Jigsaw Activity- An activity in which different members of a group are all told different parts of a text and then told to exchange the information they each have to complete a task.

    Pedagogy- the practice of teaching, how best to teach

    Reason for doing Read Alouds: Building vocabulary, developing understandings of story structures, supporting developing connections between print elements, encouraging high levels of understanding, teaching the reading process in a meaningful context, modeling fluency, motivating students to read

    Reason for using Think-Pair-Share-Think-Pair-Share helps students develop conceptual understanding of a topic, develop the ability to filter information and draw conclusions, and develop the ability to consider other points of view. The Think-Pair-Share strategy is designed to differentiate instruction by providing students time and structure for thinking on a given topic, enabling them to formulate individual ideas and share these ideas with a peer. This learning strategy promotes classroom participation by encouraging a high degree of pupil response, rather than using a basic recitation method in which a teacher poses a question and one student offers a response. Additionally, this strategy provides an opportunity for all students to share their thinking with at least one other student, which, in turn, increases their sense of involvement in classroom learning.

    Reason for using Guided Reading- The goal is to help students develop strategies to apply independently. Work focuses on processes integral to reading proficiently, such as cross-checking print and meaning information, rather than on learning a particular book’s word meanings. (For example, a student might see an illustration and say “dog” when the text says puppy, but after noticing the beginning /p/ in puppy, correct the mistake.) During guided reading, teachers monitor student reading processes and check that texts are within students’ grasps, allowing students to assemble their newly acquired skills into a smooth, integrated reading system
     
  25. Lit Girl

    Lit Girl Rookie

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    May 2, 2016

    I also like Spark Notes website for brushing up on literary works and their authors. A bit of a Cliffs Notes version, so really very helpful and also free :)

    I just posted a bunch of study guides I have put together, hopefully they help!
     
  26. May 3, 2016

    [please delete this post]
     
  27. britt11

    britt11 Rookie

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    May 7, 2016

    .
     
    Last edited: May 20, 2016
  28. Joshua Winn

    Joshua Winn Rookie

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    May 9, 2016

    Thank you for the study guide! I am so lost studying for this exam.. I don't know why I feel this way. I took the Law School Admissions Test in June 2014 and did fine but I felt like I had a more structured study guide/plan to work with!
     
  29. Lit Girl

    Lit Girl Rookie

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    May 10, 2016

    I've been studying this month pretty intensively as I failed the multiple choice section in March. As this is a career change for me, I also struggled with the scenarios. What I've been doing is looking up different methods (EX: assessing reading comp), reading several articles online (the book is a bit too generalized for some of these IMO), and then also reviewing some of the suggested links at the bottom of Google. My feeling is that I needed a solid UNDERSTANDING of how and why certain methods and scenarios work, and by starting backwards, in a sense, I can get a better grasp of the concept. It's helped me connect the dots (light bulb moments!) with other scenarios as well.

    Another thing I've put a lot of effort into is learning about Higher Order Thinking. Google it, read different related articles, until it makes sense, bc looking back, HOT would have helped a ton while struggling to choose an answer.

    I've read a lot of comments from people who passed who state that choosing group/collaborative/pairing answer is always a good choice.

    I ran a few things by with some long time teacher friends as well, and they gave invaluable advice and actually some "mini lessons" in order to help me fully grasp the WHY of something. The hope is, if I link all of these together, I'll surely pass next time around with flying colors!

    That said, I still have to retake the exam soon, ugh! The last few days I've just been reading articles, doing practice tests and jotting down helpful notes as I come across them---basically, changed up my study routine to separate the info I HAVE learned so that I can focus on what I WANT to learn. KWL anyone???

    I'm struggling with finding definitive answers on analyzing media (tv, radio, web, newspaper---which is best for analyzing media messages???), and the technology questions, so if anyone has a great resource on these, please feel free to share! :)
     
  30. Joshua Winn

    Joshua Winn Rookie

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    May 10, 2016

    Hello Lit Girl! I have a question for you.. What material did you get your study guide from? I ask so I can get the same materials and follow along to the study guide! Thanks for your help.
     
  31. Lit Girl

    Lit Girl Rookie

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    May 10, 2016

    What I posted is just stuff I put together myself.
     
  32. Joshua Winn

    Joshua Winn Rookie

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    May 10, 2016

    You've got this test! It sounds like you have put in quite the study time. I wish the best of luck to you and thank you so much for your help!
     
  33. britt11

    britt11 Rookie

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    .
     
    Last edited: May 20, 2016
  34. Joshua Winn

    Joshua Winn Rookie

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    May 14, 2016

    For those who used Jim Burke's The English Teacher's Companion 4th edition, what do you recommend studying from this book? Should I read the whole thing or are there specific parts that are important for the FTCE?
     
  35. britt11

    britt11 Rookie

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    If you find out which parts to read Joshua, please let me know. I am curious myself. Thanks!
     
  36. Joshua Winn

    Joshua Winn Rookie

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    May 19, 2016

    Hello everyone! I am registered to take the FTCE English 6-12 exam on June 9th! I finished reading FTCE: English 6-12 A Complete Content Review for the Florida Teacher Certification Exam by Dr. Jane Thielemann-Downs and I am working through the FTCE flashcards I bought. While I am feeling more prepared for the multiple choice exam, I do not feel prepared for the essay portion and I don't know where to start studying. What are some helpful tips/study guides to use in preparing for the essay portion?
     
  37. britt11

    britt11 Rookie

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    .
     
    Last edited: May 20, 2016
  38. Lit Girl

    Lit Girl Rookie

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    May 20, 2016

    They gave me the choice between poetry and an excerpt from a short story. I chose the short story and used the 5 paragraph format, with the intro, three main points and conclusion. Time does go quickly so I set up all five paragraphs first (so as not to run out of time and have an incomplete essay), then revised each paragraph to add more detail, and I also quoted directly from the passage. After editing, I had 4 seconds to spare! A lot of people do run out of time and don't finish, so get it set up quickly and develop from there. I passed the essay--- Good luck!
     
  39. britt11

    britt11 Rookie

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    .
     
  40. Joshua Winn

    Joshua Winn Rookie

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    May 23, 2016

    Thank you for this information! I will take this into consideration when I take the exam. How did you respond critically to the short story? How did you develop your main points? Thanks again for all of your help!
     

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