equivalent fractions ideas?

Discussion in 'Fourth Grade' started by newteacher52, Feb 24, 2011.

  1. newteacher52

    newteacher52 Rookie

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    Feb 24, 2011

    I am looking for fun and creative activities to teach equivalent fractions to my 4th graders. Does anyone have anything to share?
     
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  3. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

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    Feb 24, 2011

    I'm also interested in hearing some fun ideas. I get to this unit next week.
     
  4. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    Feb 24, 2011

    We made an equivalent fraction clothes line. Basically, we had some item (we used a shirt) that we divided into equal pieces and shaded different fractions. Then we hung the fractions in order and attached all the equivalent fractions together.
     
  5. newteacher52

    newteacher52 Rookie

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    Feb 26, 2011

    thank you, that sounds like a really fun way to introduce this! Does anyone have any other ideas?
     
  6. msmullenjr

    msmullenjr Devotee

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    Feb 26, 2011

    If you don't mind a) spending a little money b) giving them a little sugar...

    I buy a big box of Hershey's chocolate bars and we make equivalent fractions with those. They aren't allowed to eat theirs until they find 3 or so people with an equivalent amount. When they are lookin at chocolate they sure do know whats "equal".
     
  7. 773 Miles Away

    773 Miles Away Comrade

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    Feb 26, 2011

    It's not necessarily FUN but it was HELPFUL for my students in terms of the conceptual aspect. I always use chocolate bars as my example when we talk about fractions so each student got a piece of paper with about 10 rectangles (so we could do 5 examples). There were 2 columns of 5 rectangles. All 5 rectangles in the left column had a different fraction shaded in and was labelled. The rectangle to the right of each one had a matching shaded region. For example, the first rectangle in the top left was shaded in to represent 2/5. The rectangle on the top right was also shaded to represent 2/5. THere was an equal size between these two rectangles.

    We would simply take our pencil and draw in more lines for the rectangle on the right to make more pieces. So it would start with 5 pieces, but we would draw in 2 horizontal lines equally spaced, and now we have 15 pieces. So the PROCESS of seeing how it began and then simply making more pieces helped my students see that the amount shaded in was no different, but now it had a different label, now it was 6/15.

    Sorry for the lengthy response haha, it's late and apparently I'm having a tough time being "to the point" lol
     
  8. newteacher52

    newteacher52 Rookie

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    Feb 27, 2011

    Do you use the hershey's milk chocolate bar for fractions book?
     
  9. newteacher52

    newteacher52 Rookie

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    Feb 27, 2011

    I got the point, thanks for the reply.
     
  10. teacherCA

    teacherCA Rookie

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    Apr 1, 2011

    I made up a game similar to "Go Fish" called "Fraction Go Fish". I wrote each fraction on an index card-about 20 or so in one deck. The kids get the hang of it quick! I made 6 decks as I have the kids sitting in cooperative learning groups and needed one deck of cards per group.
     
  11. TeacherShelly

    TeacherShelly Aficionado

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    Apr 1, 2011

    Two things:

    - A retiring teacher just gave me a core from a masking tape roll (like a 5" diameter cardboard circle) with 20 10-foot yarn strands tied to it. She puts her class of 20 kids in a circle with the cardboard circle in the middle. Each kid gets a yarn end. Then they form pie charts. "Let's have 1/4 of the circle (5 kids sitting next to each other in the circle) put their yarn in the center." Then you can see the 3/4 pie chart. For equivalents, you have 10 kids hold two pieces each. Have 2 kids put their 2 yarns in the middle, and one kid put 1 yarn in the middle (2.5 is 1/4 of 10). It looks exactly like the 3/4.

    - Pattern blocks are a powerful tool for equivalent fractions. Have small groups meet with you. They put two yellow hexagons together to make "1" whole. Then you ask them to cover 1/4 with red trapezoids. this will take 1 trapezoid. then cover that 1/4 with green triangles. It will take 3 triangles. So, three triangles (3/12) is equivalent to 1 hexagon (1/4).
     
  12. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Apr 2, 2011

    I'm not elementary, but here's how I think I would introduce it:

    I would draw 1 circles, one cut into eighths and one into sixteenths.

    When my kids were little, every time I ordered a pizza I would have it divided into 16 slices instead of 8-- less waste that way. So maybe Julia would have 1/16 and Kira would have 1/16. Peter and Brian and I, of course, would have our normal serving-- so I would have 1/8-- or two small slices. Brian would have 2/8-- or 4 small slices. And so on.


    Our you could talk about money-- how a dime is 1/10 of a dollar, but it's the same as 2 nickels-- 2/20...
     

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