EnVision Math

Discussion in 'First Grade' started by taw24, Aug 23, 2008.

  1. taw24

    taw24 Rookie

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    Aug 23, 2008

    I am a student teacher, and I will begin with teaching first grade math using the EnVision Math curriculum. I have not had the chance to look it over as school starts next Monday. Can someone give me an overview of this program. Also I am confused... I thought that student teachers are expected to make their own lesson plans, but they said I can use these or make my own. How do all of you like these lesson plans, can you make them your own? What will a typical lesson look like and include. Advise please.
     
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  3. turtlegirl

    turtlegirl Companion

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    Aug 24, 2008

    That is a pretty "deep" question. Envision is a brand new program so you will not find alot of people who have experience in it, including you sponsor teacher. Check out the website to scott foresman, there is alot on there.

    As for lesson plans, when using a series you tend to follow the lesson plans that go with it, and adapt them to your need and the needs of your students.

    Good luck
     
  4. MissR

    MissR Comrade

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    Aug 26, 2008

    For each lesson you will need kid workbooks, the overhead from the pouch and the teacher manual for the script - at least until you get used to it. I just taught lesson #3 today, so I am still looking at the script to make sure I'm doing it right. There is a problem of the day also. Each lesson has an objective already, which will be nice for your lesson plans to turn in, then there will be an introduction, visual learning bridge (VLB), guided practice, and independent practice every time. The VLB is just a series of pictures that you use to ask the kids questions (which are on the overhead). Why give yourself more work? use their lesson! For the first couple lessons you will need kid counters (to count with) of some sort. Oh, there is also a little animation to show! but I don't have the technology to show it to my class.
     
  5. reckers

    reckers Rookie

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    Aug 26, 2008

    Hi Rookie,

    I'm a first year special ed teacher and am learning about Envision Math as well. My concern is the limited amount of space that students have to do their work. Today, students were working on addition where they had to draw so many, say apples in one column and a different amount in the other and add them all up. That's all fine and dandy, but it seems more geared towards regular ed. One of my students I work with has cerebral palsy and his hand shakes. So, I'm trying to figure out maybe an alternative way for him to work these problems with limited space, you know? Something to keep in mind for any special needs kids in your class, if there are any. Well, good luck to you.
     
  6. jenejoy

    jenejoy Companion

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    Aug 27, 2008

    I don't think that I could concisely tell you about it. I had 40 hours of training on it last week and I'm still reeling from all the info. It looks like an Awesome program though and I cannot wait to get into it. I am concerned with the pacing. 1 lesson/day in our district just as the program suggests to be done in 150 day prior to testing. My suggestion is to get a hold on that first topic and go over several times. Check out the differentiated instruction areas. The various test formats. I plan to have 1 1/2 to 2 hrs for math everyday in order to do the program at the suggested pace (that include math center activities). Have an overhead at the ready if you do not have a lCD projector or ELMO. You will need it to model the interactive learning and the visual bridge (transparencies should be included for these activities). Check out the materials needed carefull we have found several times where there were materials that were needed but not listed. I plan to do the problem of the day at calendar. The rest will go through the lesson: Daily Spiral Review, developing learning interactive, visual bridge (do not skip this- this is the direct instruction piece that ties the manipulative to the practice), then guided practice and independent practice (I will use this as my quick assessment coding it for centers for later __(blank) = intervention necessary, * = on level practice at centers, **= advanced practice at centers). I will also do the problem solving whole group so that I can stress the test strategies and tips foundin each lesson to prepare them for next years Standards tests. After problem solving I will not be doing most of the quick checks as of now...I will be heading off to differentiated instruction- pulling my intervention kids. Well it wasn't very concise but that's about as much of an overview as I can think of to give. Really though you need to pour over 1 topic at least and figure out what components there are in every lesson so that you can feel prepared.
     
  7. Curric

    Curric New Member

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    Nov 30, 2008

    Spanish?

    Has anyone tried the Spanish version of enVision?
     
  8. succeed

    succeed Rookie

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    Dec 13, 2008

    I can not stand the Envision math we are using. The other teachers in first grade are in agreement. Some of the word problems are insane. This program hasn't taught number lines. Then all of the sudden their is a number line on the test. I heard last year they learned all about number lines. Then there are insane questions for first graders. Johnny has five footballs. David has 3 soccer balls. Michael has 8 basketballs. Jordan has 4 baseballs. Edward found a football outside. How many footballs altogether? What? Are you kidding. These kids couldn't read this problem at the time. Also, this program hasn't taught to eliminate unimportant information. Again, I heard last year this was taught with the other program. So they are just beginning to learn addition in first grade. So 5+4=9 is the stuff my children have been working on. Then on the test it has the question What does this picture show? Does it show 4=5-1 or 6=2+4? So the next day my kids got really confused and started writing 3=2+5. Here was another question...What does this picture show? So the pictures show a bunch of bananas, but one banana actually looks like it could represent two bananas. The banana had a slash in the middle of it. So that was confusing. I had to draw a banana and show the kids that it looked like two bananas, but it was only one banana. Then there was the crayon question. The crayon question puzzled the teachers for a moment. We were working on how many are inside and how many are outside. So the worksheet had a bizarre question. There are thirteen crayons inside the box and five crayons outside the box. I forget exactly how the question was worded. Find the number sentence for this picture. So basically, you had to realize that although there were thirteen crayons in the box some of them were upside down. Then you had to realize that some of the ones outside the box were upside down. So you had to count the ones upside down and add it to the rest. Are you kidding me! I am sorry, but I think the program is a joke. I assume this is supposed to prepare the children for future testing, but I think the program is just confusing them. I am in a low income school, but even my gifted students get confused.
     
  9. lemonhead

    lemonhead Aficionado

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    Dec 14, 2008

    There is so much to look over it is ridiculous. It's too much if you ask me. We use it as filler.
     
  10. lemonhead

    lemonhead Aficionado

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    Dec 14, 2008


    The place value and the pages for the lessons on using unifix cubes for addition were ridiculous too. I find some way areas too easy and then others like what you discribed above with the crayons or the Sum=addend + addend sentences. Yes they need to learn that but now? Not when you are also teaching turnaround facts and fact families.
     
  11. lemonhead

    lemonhead Aficionado

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    Dec 14, 2008

    We had a quick hour and a half overview. See, our state says we have to have a math program, which in our case is enVision. It doesn't say we have to use it though.

    We have mandated lessons from the district and then we use the parts of the enVision as filler. When we had our orientation, we all thought it was awesome. Then, they announced these new mandated math lessons. The two together are just way too much.

    It would be great if you could have a couple weeks to just really dig into it and go over it with your team members, like during the summer or something. What makes it so frustrating for us is we have to skip all over the place because our mandated lessons don't follow the order.

    You get boxes upon boxes of flashy materials, it's putting it all together that is the tough part.
     
  12. 4alicat

    4alicat Companion

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    Dec 14, 2008

    Thanks for the info! I can see how having the 2 different math lessons make things difficult!

    Traditionally when we adopt a new textbook, our district gives us the teacher's guides before school gets out in June so we can look through it through the summer. But the rest of the materials we don't get until the week or so before school starts. And then we get our first training the day before the kids start.

    If our district does happen to adopt enVision then I think I'm going to try and push to see if we can get full access to the online stuff. Even if we don't have the physical materials, at least being able to see the things online would help.

    The last couple adoptions we've had were social studies & then science. So it wasn't as big a deal that we weren't totally trained & prepped. But with a subject like math or language arts, it's much more important that we be better prepared.
     
  13. silver rain

    silver rain Comrade

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    Jan 3, 2009

    My district adopted envision this year. We received an hour overview of program and that was it.
    We were finally told only to use workbook pages as homework or additional practice. We only use the Investigations books and supplement with other district approved lessons form the Dana Center in Texas. This program doesn't align with district guidelines so we jump around alot to make it fit our needs. Our district is big into "Mental Math." They want us to stick to using manipulitives to provide a sound foundation.
     
  14. 4alicat

    4alicat Companion

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    Jan 22, 2009

    Just wondering if anyone has any new information about the enVision math program since many of the posts were from earlier in the school year. How's it going? Any comments on it?
     
  15. noreenk

    noreenk Cohort

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    Jan 22, 2009

    We've been so unimpressed that we use it solely for homework and occasional games. It's definitely not sufficient preparation for TAKS on its own.
     
  16. 4alicat

    4alicat Companion

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    Jan 23, 2009

    Is there something in particular that you don't like? My district is leaning towards this one and I have an inservice on it next week. Any input will help me when I get to see the materials. Thanks!

     
  17. keltikmom

    keltikmom New Member

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    Sep 7, 2009

    Run away!! Envision is far too complicated and developmentally inappropriate for primary grades. Unless you have up to the minute technology you will be pulling your hair out by day 2. Also, to fully teach the program you will need 90 minutes to 2 hours PER DAY to each it.
     
  18. pinkpotato

    pinkpotato Rookie

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    Sep 8, 2009

    Quite the contrary. EnVision has been an incredible step up for our district. The students are doing a lot more problem solving than ever before, and IF you use all the parts of the program correctly (as in, if you don't just use parts of it for homework or filler, or however the previous posters put it), it all fits together and is pretty cohesive. Yes, it takes time. But you use your professional judgement, skip a problem or two here and there if the time is short, and you can generally get it all done in about 80-90 minutes tops. The one huge weakness is the fact that for the primary grades, the workmats are not available as overheads, and if you can project them from the CD/DVD, Website, or on a document projector, then it's easier. But the no-tech teachers seem to like it too.
     
  19. NC1stGradeTeach

    NC1stGradeTeach Rookie

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    Sep 8, 2009

    This is a new program for my district this school year. I wish we could have more professional development on how to use the program. I feel a little lost because I haven't taught math in four years
     
  20. 4alicat

    4alicat Companion

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    Sep 8, 2009

    They have great online professional development resources at: http://www.mypearsontraining.com/index.asp

    We had no $ for training & so we used this when we piloted the program & it gave us so much information!
     
  21. NC1stGradeTeach

    NC1stGradeTeach Rookie

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    Sep 8, 2009

    Thanks!!!!!;):):thanks:
     
  22. ColoradoTeacher

    ColoradoTeacher New Member

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    Apr 2, 2010

    Our district just decided (against the adoption committees vote) to go with EnVision. Our particular school is very upset, we have been doing Everyday Math for over 13 years and have the highest growth in our district, second highest in our city (over 500k people). EnVision looks horrific to us. We are mourning not being able to continue to use Everyday Math. Anyone looking to EnVision, DON'T! There is no data to support growth.
     
  23. terptoteacher

    terptoteacher Connoisseur

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    Apr 18, 2010

    All these posts are very interesting...we are piloting two curriculums for next year. enVision is one. I was asked to teach enVision for one week, then the other one for a week.
    I brought Unit 13 home this weekend to plan. It looks good so far, but I haven't actually taught it, so I don't know what the pacing will look like.

    We've been using Everyday Math and I have mixed feelings about it. I believe the pacing for EM is too fast and my struggling learners have a very difficult time.
     

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