Entering Teaching Profession With Masters Degree (Good or Bad Idea)

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by duffman3242, Feb 25, 2009.

  1. duffman3242

    duffman3242 New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2009
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 25, 2009

    I was wondering whether its a good idea to complete my masters degree before actually starting to teach in a classroom. I will be teaching Physics on a High School level. Thanks
     
  2.  
  3. puff5655

    puff5655 Cohort

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2006
    Messages:
    726
    Likes Received:
    8

    Feb 25, 2009

    I think it depends where. What I've been told (as an Elementary teacher) is that in highly competitive states (ie NY), you basically need your Masters to get hired. But in less competitive states (ie NC, FL), having your Masters can work against you, because they would prefer to hire cheaper candidates.
     
  4. amahogany954

    amahogany954 Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2009
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 25, 2009

    Great quesition duffman.... I am kinda of in the same boat I wanted to start my masters because I am a career changer and think no one will hire me without experience or a degree in education. At the same time I hear that a lot of states are looking to hire someone at the cheaper rate so maybe I should wait.


    Puff good response thanks I am in FL and hear that all the time to wait before I get my masters....
     
  5. MuggleBug

    MuggleBug Companion

    Joined:
    May 7, 2008
    Messages:
    169
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 25, 2009

    I don't think it will hurt you, especially as a Physics teacher.
     
  6. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2007
    Messages:
    14,468
    Likes Received:
    2,485

    Feb 25, 2009

    I'd have to say that it depends on where you're looking for a job and what subject you'll be teaching.

    As far as I'm aware, there aren't oodles and oodles of Physics teachers out there. I would imagine that the demand for Physics teachers is a little higher than, say, Social Studies teachers. Because of that, it might not matter whether you have a Masters degree.

    To be on the safe side, you might want to ask around. See what nearby districts have to say about it.

    Good luck!
     
  7. mollydoll

    mollydoll Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2009
    Messages:
    1,640
    Likes Received:
    57

    Feb 25, 2009

    With a physics degree, I don't think you need to worry. If your state has provisional/emergency credentials, you would be a shoe-in. I am in a similar situation--my degree is in a high need science area, so I am looking for jobs just based on my B.S. and am getting lots of 2nd interviews lined up.

    The job market is rough, but those of us with science degrees are in a much more favorable position just through supply and demand.
     
  8. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2007
    Messages:
    17,362
    Likes Received:
    46

    Feb 25, 2009

    I would say as a Physics teacher you don't have to worry about it since there is such a demand in that area (one of few).
     
  9. amahogany954

    amahogany954 Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2009
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 25, 2009

    Hi everyone,

    Can you guys tell me what areas are really in demand?
     
  10. MuggleBug

    MuggleBug Companion

    Joined:
    May 7, 2008
    Messages:
    169
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 25, 2009

    For the most part...secondary science and math, and special education (all levels).
     
  11. Kangaroo22

    Kangaroo22 Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2008
    Messages:
    6,216
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 25, 2009

    It really depends on where you are. Where I live districts have no problems filling any positions. But there is a lot less competition in math, chemistry, physics and foreign language (for example instead of hundreds and hundreds of applicants there are closer to 20 per opening in those areas). Special education here is pretty saturated also, because of dual-certifications.

    You'll really have to look at the area that you want to teach in and check, but in a good portion of the country elementary, social studies and English are completely saturated markets.
     
  12. FutureFLTeacher

    FutureFLTeacher Companion

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2006
    Messages:
    164
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 26, 2009

    I have to agree...my certification is in biology. I was debating on going back for my Master's but as so many others have stated, the science, math and ESL areas (at least here) are in need of teachers so the competition isn't nearly as massive as it is in the other subject areas.

    A few friends of mine who already who work in these high needs areas are like me, transitional teachers who have bachelor's degrees in a completely different area than they are teaching in, but are certified in their area.

    I'm all about people bettering themselves with a higher education, I think it's one of the best things you can do for yourself. For me, financially long term it wasn't feasible, but if you can afford to do it and know it will assist in obtaining the position you truly want, then go for it! :)
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. futuremathsprof,
  2. Ms.Holyoke,
  3. Backroads
Total: 428 (members: 5, guests: 405, robots: 18)
test