English Nightmare...Homophones vs Homonyms

Discussion in 'General Education Archives' started by Ms.S60074, Jul 8, 2006.

  1. Ms.S60074

    Ms.S60074 Rookie

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2006
    Messages:
    73
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 8, 2006

    So I thought I would do a mini lesson on homophones for my high school LD kids this summer just to brush them up on their seriously lacking vocab skills. I pulled out a book with some reproducibles in it, to be horribly shocked that in my opinion they had defined homonyms incorrectly. The book said a homonym is a word that sounds the same as another but has a different meaning. Then they give their examples...i.e. Air vs. Heir and Blue vs. Blew. I thought to myself..."Absolutely not, those are homophones not homonyms". Homonyms were once again in my opinion, words that are spelled the same but have different meanings....i.e. fine (a fee that you pay) vs fine (a state of positive feeling). UGH! So I did some research on this topic to find out that even the major dictioaries cannot agree on a definition. See the websitehttp://rogersreference.com/rrhomonyms.htm
    I guess as a teacher you just have to point out that these things exist in the English language but no one can agree on the terminology??? :confused: :confused: :confused:
     
  2.  
  3. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2002
    Messages:
    18,935
    Likes Received:
    676

    Jul 8, 2006

    Annoying that there is no consistency, but if the kids could just remember the spellings and the meanings, I'd be happy!
     
  4. Proud2BATeacher

    Proud2BATeacher Phenom

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2005
    Messages:
    4,896
    Likes Received:
    5

    Jul 8, 2006

    So what are the definitions for each?
     
  5. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2001
    Messages:
    24,948
    Likes Received:
    2,096

    Jul 8, 2006

    A homonym is a word that has the same pronunciation and spelling as another word, but a different meaning. (bat-baseball equipment, bat-nocturnal animal)
    A homograph is a word that has the same spelling as another word, but a different meaning.(dove- a bird, dove- past tense of dive)
    A homophone is a word that has the same pronunciation as another word, but a different meaning.(there, their):D
     
  6. yclark

    yclark Comrade

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2006
    Messages:
    282
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 8, 2006

    a site

    I researched this several months ago when my first graders started playing with words. I found this statement and other stuff at: www.firstschoolyears.com/literacy/word/other/homonyms/homonyms.htm

    Homonyms, Homophones and Homographs

    Homonyms are words which have the same spelling and pronunciation as each other but different meanings and origins.

    Homophones are words which have the same pronunciation as each other but different spellings and meanings.

    Homographs are words which are spelt the same as each other but which have a different pronunciation and meaning.

    This page contains free worksheets, online activities and other educational resources to help with homonyms, homophones and homographs.
     
  7. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2002
    Messages:
    18,935
    Likes Received:
    676

    Jul 8, 2006

    Thank you for that link!
     
  8. ChristyF

    ChristyF Moderator

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2003
    Messages:
    6,699
    Likes Received:
    65

    Jul 8, 2006

    Wow. I was taught that homonyms were the group name for homophones and homographs. A homophone, I was told, had one sound, but different spellings. A homograph had one spelling, but different meanings. Even in our reading series, when the lesson is on homonyms, it has homographs and homophones on the page. (Like a page on verbs might have action and being verbs. Does that make any sense?)
     
  9. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2001
    Messages:
    24,948
    Likes Received:
    2,096

    Jul 8, 2006

    Yes- I've also heard that homonyms is a catchall phrase for homophones and homographs. But the definitions cited above make more sense to me.
     
  10. Music Doc

    Music Doc Habitué

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2006
    Messages:
    811
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 8, 2006

    I thought homonyms went into making grits!
     
  11. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

    Joined:
    May 13, 2005
    Messages:
    29,633
    Likes Received:
    1,097

    Jul 8, 2006

    This might help:

    graph is Greek for 'writing' or 'written': so homographs are written (spelled) the same.

    phone is Greek for 'sound': so homophones sound the same.

    onom-, onym is Greek for 'name', which makes some sense of the confusion between homonym 'same spelling and sound' and homonym 'catchall category for homophones and homographs'.
     
  12. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

    Joined:
    May 13, 2005
    Messages:
    29,633
    Likes Received:
    1,097

    Jul 8, 2006

    Doc, I think in your case that would be three-part hominy.
     
  13. Proud2BATeacher

    Proud2BATeacher Phenom

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2005
    Messages:
    4,896
    Likes Received:
    5

    Jul 8, 2006

    Thanks! I just wanted to make sure that I taught my students the right definition for a homophone this year and I did :angel: .
     
  14. Mamacita

    Mamacita Aficionado

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2004
    Messages:
    3,318
    Likes Received:
    10

    Jul 8, 2006

    Our language is an awesome and diverse wonderment of cool. I love all the little oddities and idiosyncracies. I love to delve deeply into a word's etymology. I love how our spelling reflects a word's origin.

    Am I in the right profession or what?
     
  15. Music Doc

    Music Doc Habitué

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2006
    Messages:
    811
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 8, 2006

    TG, posting that DID take some grit!
     
  16. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

    Joined:
    May 13, 2005
    Messages:
    29,633
    Likes Received:
    1,097

    Jul 8, 2006

    WORD GEEKS, UNITE!
     
  17. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

    Joined:
    May 13, 2005
    Messages:
    29,633
    Likes Received:
    1,097

    Jul 8, 2006

    You bet, Doc: it took polenta of grit! But it's all mush of a mushness.
     
  18. Music Doc

    Music Doc Habitué

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2006
    Messages:
    811
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 8, 2006

    Dyslexics of the world, UNTIE!
     
  19. kinderkids

    kinderkids Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2005
    Messages:
    7,630
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 8, 2006

    Oh boy!!!!! You two are at it again I see!:rolleyes:
     
  20. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

    Joined:
    May 13, 2005
    Messages:
    29,633
    Likes Received:
    1,097

    Jul 8, 2006

    Uh-oh, Doc: they're on to us.
     
  21. kinderkids

    kinderkids Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2005
    Messages:
    7,630
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 8, 2006

    TG.................I've been on to you for A LONG TIME!
     
  22. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

    Joined:
    May 13, 2005
    Messages:
    29,633
    Likes Received:
    1,097

    Jul 8, 2006

    But as his post #17 shows, Doc's been knottier than I.
     
  23. kinderkids

    kinderkids Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2005
    Messages:
    7,630
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 8, 2006

    TG...................you've got me there! Doc.............you definitely are knottier
     
  24. Music Doc

    Music Doc Habitué

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2006
    Messages:
    811
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 8, 2006

    Hey, I'm just learning the ropes! Let's KNOT get me trouble with the hijack police now....
     
  25. ChristyF

    ChristyF Moderator

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2003
    Messages:
    6,699
    Likes Received:
    65

    Jul 8, 2006

    To help my kids keep them straight we do the signs. Homograph (I remind them of graphics on a computer. So that would be one look (we hold up 1 finger and then do the eye glasses with our hands.) Homophone (you listen to a phone) so one hear (again hold up one finger then do the "phone" with your fingers at your ear. Cheesy, I know, but they get it! Of course these are the same kids who make me do my Latitude and Longitude cheer for them (With big cheesy cheerleader moves Longitude runs North to South; doesn't that fill your mouth? Latitude runs East to West; 'cuz it is the very best!!:D Whatever it takes!
     
  26. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

    Joined:
    May 13, 2005
    Messages:
    29,633
    Likes Received:
    1,097

    Jul 8, 2006

    Learning the ropes, or tying one on?

    In any case, it's knot a situation that calls for hijack police: puns depend CRUCIALLY on homonymy, homophony, and homography.
     
  27. Texas Gal

    Texas Gal Companion

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2006
    Messages:
    188
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 9, 2006

    Christy - I LOVE your cheer! Too cute!!
     
  28. Music Doc

    Music Doc Habitué

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2006
    Messages:
    811
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 9, 2006


    So, then, you're saying the sum of some knots might not be too bad if two bees were in a whir over the sound from Long Island sound?
     
  29. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2001
    Messages:
    24,948
    Likes Received:
    2,096

    Jul 9, 2006

    But are they puns or homophones or just a series of misspellings in which case those who are so inclined will get their panties in a twist over such matters.....
     
  30. Music Doc

    Music Doc Habitué

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2006
    Messages:
    811
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 9, 2006

    Currently polling the members of the "Society for Correct Language Use Among Teachers".....and finding that the members actually ARE intelligent enough to recognize humor.
     
  31. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2001
    Messages:
    24,948
    Likes Received:
    2,096

    Jul 9, 2006

    Phew!:p So I'll untwist then-:cool:
     
  32. Music Doc

    Music Doc Habitué

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2006
    Messages:
    811
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 9, 2006

    Good.....no sense being twisted on the weekend.
     
  33. Mamacita

    Mamacita Aficionado

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2004
    Messages:
    3,318
    Likes Received:
    10

    Jul 10, 2006

    Speaking of twisted. . . . my principal once called me to his office and said that a parent was extremely upset with me because her son had told her that I was teaching my students all about gay people. I was flabbergasted, but this mother persisted in her furious rant. We finally figured out that her son had told his parents he was being taught all about homophones and homonyms, and yes, his mother was THAT STUPID. Can anybody beat that one?
     
  34. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

    Joined:
    May 13, 2005
    Messages:
    29,633
    Likes Received:
    1,097

    Jul 10, 2006

    Two bees or not two bees, Doc, THAT is the question: it's clear that, given this knot, never the twine shall meet.
     
  35. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2002
    Messages:
    18,935
    Likes Received:
    676

    Jul 10, 2006

    Oh, Mamacita, that is priceless. No, I can't beat that one. Not with a dead bee.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. RainStorm,
  2. Backroads,
  3. teacherguy111
Total: 569 (members: 3, guests: 539, robots: 27)
test