Employablility: Mild Handicapped vs Mod/Severe vs All Handicapps

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by tek_war505, Oct 1, 2010.

  1. tek_war505

    tek_war505 Rookie

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2010
    Messages:
    32
    Likes Received:
    0

    Oct 1, 2010

    Right now I am just working on getting my Special Education license in mild handicapps however I can also get for free from another local univerisity licensure in moderate/severe handicapps. I am thinking being licensed in both areas would make me more hireable, but I have had teachers tell me not to do that ! They told me they made the mistake of doing that and now to maintain their licensure they need to take a lot more classes and pay twice as much money to the state to keep their license renewed.

    Any thoughts or opinion?
     
  2.  
  3. AspieTeacher

    AspieTeacher Comrade

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2005
    Messages:
    406
    Likes Received:
    0

    Oct 2, 2010

    tek_war,

    Believe it or not, there are more openings working with students with autism and learning handicaps than moderate/severe disabilities right now. When I say "LD". I mean students who ARE NOT IN RESOURCE classes. These are students who may be able to get a vocational degree after finishing high school, MAY be able to attend college. I live in California and most of the openings were in mild/moderate disabilities. I work with moderate/severe only right now. I don't know if I could handle working with students with mild disabilities though.
    Troy in Los Angeles, Ca
     
  4. lajoers3

    lajoers3 Comrade

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2006
    Messages:
    314
    Likes Received:
    0

    Oct 2, 2010

    Sorry, can't help you because here in Australia there is no seperate licensure for mild, moderate and severe disabilities. I have a general qualification in special education although you can specialise further if desired with sensory disabilities.
    I would think that having both would make you more hireable but from what you are saying perhaps not. Maybe you should ask various different principals or AP's and see what their point of view is.
     
  5. Special-t

    Special-t Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2008
    Messages:
    2,019
    Likes Received:
    19

    Oct 2, 2010

    You should really choose what you're suited for. Frankly, some people are not cut out for mod/severe teaching. If you're not - then don't bother getting the credential because it will be a waste of time. It's completely different than mild/moderate.

    I discovered my preference by observing and subbing classes in both categories. I truly believe that students in mod/severe classes deserve a teacher fully dedicated to learning how to teach that population.

    It's unlikely that a school will hire you to teach both categories because mod/severe students need a dedicated teacher almost all day.

    On the other hand, if you have an interest in both categories, then go for it.

    If you're trying to make yourself more marketable, get lots of experience with the population you want to teach.
     
  6. mom2mikey

    mom2mikey Cohort

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2009
    Messages:
    550
    Likes Received:
    0

    Oct 3, 2010

    :thumb: I completely agree with this. Go after that you know you are going to love to do and do it with all your heart.
     
  7. Zelda~*

    Zelda~* Devotee

    Joined:
    May 18, 2008
    Messages:
    1,042
    Likes Received:
    81

    Oct 3, 2010

    I teach mild-moderate, I couldn't do moderate-severe. My hat is off to those individuals.

    I had absolutely no trouble landing interviews and job offers in the summer of '08. I had two job offers, turned one down, and when I took the other offer I was offered a second interview on yet another job. It was nice to feel so wanted. ;)

    I agree with what others have said. Go observe, volunteer, etc. where you can. Check out the Behavior/ED rooms too! :D
     
  8. teacher12345

    teacher12345 Cohort

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2010
    Messages:
    536
    Likes Received:
    0

    Oct 3, 2010

    What disabillities are considered mild to moderate? what disabilities are considered moderate to intense?
     
  9. Special-t

    Special-t Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2008
    Messages:
    2,019
    Likes Received:
    19

    Oct 3, 2010

    The labels may be slightly different depending upon where you teach.

    Students in mild/moderate have the ability to access the general education curriculum that is either exactly the same as their peers - or sometimes modified to fit their individual goals. These students might have learning disabilities, high functioning autism, emotional disturbance, mild/mod cognitive impairment.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. vickilyn,
  2. Charlie Trahan,
  3. bella84,
  4. miss-m,
  5. Preschool0929
Total: 450 (members: 8, guests: 425, robots: 17)
test